Section II - Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome

STRATEGIC OUTCOME 1: DEFENCE OPERATIONS AND SERVICES IMPROVE STABILITY AND SECURITY, AND PROMOTE CANADIAN INTERESTS and VALUES

There are two Programs associated with this Strategic Outcome:

  • Program 1.0: Defence Combat and Support Operations
  • Program 2.0: Defence Services and Contributions to Government

These Programs were designed to encompass the full spectrum of operations and services delivered by Defence, some of which by their nature are very unpredictable. For those Programs, there will be no or little programmed spending until trend data is available. In addition, Programs focused on rare and exceptional occurrences will also have no forecast spending.

Program 1.0: Defence Combat and Support Operations

The Defence Combat and Support Operations Program delivers military power in combat, security, stability and surveillance operations in response to armed threats, or potential armed aggression, for the purpose of protecting Canadian sovereignty, upholding the values of Canadians, and defending the interests of the Government of Canada. Results are achieved through this Program by the application of Defence capabilities in domestic, continental and international domains, either independently or in combination with allies, where the primary focus is to inflict military effects against threats. The term Defence capability is a collective term that refers to the ability of a military force to achieve a desired effect against a threat during the execution of a Defence operation (or the delivery of a Defence service) by executing tasks according to understood concepts, doctrine and standards. The military forces delivered by Defence are composed of force elements which are organizational entities that are in-turn composed of members of the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF), and in some cases personnel from the Department of National Defence (DND). Force elements integrate people, with specialized information, materiel (e.g., equipment, platforms, weapon systems) and in some cases real property, so that capabilities can be applied against threats. Force elements have different sizes and compositions according to the capabilities they must apply during an operation. This Program is underpinned by the National Defence Act, defence policy, international treaties and agreements, membership in international organizations, and direction received by the Government of Canada. Sub-programs beneath this Program target a range of threats across a variety of operational contexts via different delivery mechanisms in different geographic regions.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Main Estimates Planned SpendingTotal Authorities Available for Use Actual Spending (authorities used)

Difference
(actual minus planned)

1,363,942,346 1,363,942,347 1,584,467,565 1,229,363,372 (134,578,975)
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 6,328 5,978 (350)
Civilian 931 661 (270)
TOTAL 7,259 6,639 (620)
Note: Due to rounding, figures may not add up to total shown.

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
The application of Canadian Defence and Security capabilities continuously protects the sovereignty of Canada, the values of Canadians and the interests of the Government of Canada against risks imposed by armed threats % of Defence Combat and Support Operations that have successfully achieved their operational objectives 90 - 100% 99.5%

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In a complex and unpredictable global security environment, Defence continues to protect Canadian interests and values at home and abroad. From Afghanistan to the Republic of Iraq, Canada’s military has consistently contributed to multinational operations to deter terrorism, to defend human rights, and to act as a force for good in this world.

In 2014-15, the CAF stood with international partners to combat the threat posed by the so-called Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) with an advise and assist mission, an air task force, special forces, liaison officers and support elements such as command and control, medical personnel, and logistics. Outside the Middle-East, ISIS also threatens the security and stability of Western countries which strengthens Canada’s resolve to continue the fight against ISIS and global terrorism.

In addition, Canada acted with its NATO allies to promote security and stability in Central and Eastern Europe. The deployment of personnel and equipment in support to NATO assurance measures is one of several meaningful and important ways that Canada is demonstrating a long-standing commitment to NATO.

Through the Military Training and Cooperation Program, the Defence Team built capacity and fostered interoperability, while strengthening the capacity of partner countries to contribute to international peace and security.

At home, the CAF continued to demonstrate operational excellence in domestic operations, including exercising Canada’s Arctic sovereignty. Also, by working closely with the United States in the defence of North America through the bi-national North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD), the CAF significantly contributed to providing aerospace surveillance and control, as well as maritime warning.

In the period leading up to the attacks in October 2014, the CAF maintained Force Protection Measures (FPM) commensurate with known threats at the time. Following the two attacks on CAF members on home soil, the CAF raised its Force Protection Levels as an appropriate response to these actions, while continuing to defend Canadians and Canadian interests at home and abroad. On the order of the CDS, Commander Canadian Joint Operations Command issued direction for bases across Canada to increase local FPM and for CAF High Readiness Units to heighten their alert status. When such national threat and events happen, the Canadian Armed Forces are in constant communication with our federal partners and allies on issues regarding the safety and security of Canada and Canadians.

The Defence Team as a whole remained committed to the defence of Canada and Canadian interests.

For details regarding CAF operations, see the sub- and sub-sub-programs below and the Operations 18 page on the Defence website.

Sub-Program 1.1: Domestic and Continental Defence Operations

Domestic and Continental Defence Operations aim to deliver military power within Canada and across North America in response to armed threats, or the potential for armed aggression, in order to protect Canadian sovereignty, uphold the values of Canadians, and defend the interests of the Government of Canada. Results are achieved through the employment of force elements, either independently or in concert with continental partners, that apply requisite military capabilities in the conduct of routine and contingency operations. Routine operations typically occur on an ongoing basis, whereas contingency operations may be planned for but occur only in response to a particular event or upon specific request from the Government of Canada. Therefore not all of the sub-sub-programs under this Program may contain significant operations every fiscal year. However, regardless of when and if they occur, the operations within this Program typically aim to maintain and/or restore domestic and continental security through the detection and monitoring of threats and, when necessary, deliver military intervention. This Program is bound by several federal laws, regulations, policies, international conventions and bi-national agreements such as the North American Aerospace Defence agreement that facilitates co-ordination and shared responsibilities for the defence of the North American continent.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

335,590,254 199,444,971 (136,145,283)
Note: The difference is due in part to variances explained under sub-sub-programs 1.1.2: Ongoing Defence, Security and Sovereignty of Canada Operations and 1.1.4: Ongoing Continental Defence Operations in Cooperation with the United States.
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 2,532 2,249 (283)
Civilian 22 3 (19)
TOTAL 2,554 2,252 (302)
Note: Due to rounding, figures may not add up to total shown.
Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
Risks imposed by armed threats against the sovereignty of Canada, the values of Canadians, and the interests of the Canadian Government are reduced % of Domestic and Continental Defence operations that have successfully achieved their operational objectives 90 - 100% 100%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Program performance was assessed against the goal of 90 percent of domestic and continental Defence operations successfully achieving their operational objectives. The CAF deployed personnel and capabilities to successfully conduct defence security, sovereignty and continental operations, including through existing Canada-United States agreements, to deliver military power within Canada and across North America and to protect and defend Canada.

For details regarding CAF operations, see the sub-sub-programs below. For information on the Incremental Costs for Major Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) Continental Operations 19, see the Defence website.

Sub-Sub-Program 1.1.1: Operations to Defend Canada Against Armed Threats

Operations to Defend Canada Against Armed Threats aim to defend Canada against armed threats and provide military power when necessary anywhere in Canada for the purpose of averting major crises where armed aggressors threaten Canadians, Canadian sovereignty, or the interests of the Canadian Government. Results are achieved through the deployment of immediate response force elements and, when required, the mobilization, employment and sustainment of larger follow-on force elements in accordance with the mandated role of National Defence. This Program directly supports Canada and Canadians.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

-  -
Note: Since operations in this Program are rare and unexpected, no expenditures were forecasted. Since no domestic combat operations took place during the year, there were no expenditures in this Program.
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force  - -
Civilian  -
TOTAL
Note: Personnel are drawn from Ready Forces as required to provide Defence services under this sub-sub-program. Since no domestic combat operations took place during the year, there were no human resources attributed to this sub-sub-program.

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
The Canadian territory is secure and protected from crises and risks associated with direct affronts by armed threats % of Commander's Intent (Operational Objectives) that have been met 90 - 100% N/A
% of Stated Operational Effects achieved 90 - 100% N/A
% assigned critical tasks completed 90 - 100% N/A
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

While no domestic combat operations took place during FY 2014-15, high readiness capabilities were maintained to generate immediate response forces, at various states of readiness, to respond to crises anywhere in Canada.

For details on defence readiness, see Program 3.0: Defence Ready Force Element Production.

Sub-Sub-Program 1.1.2: Ongoing Defence, Security and Sovereignty of Canada Operations

Ongoing Defence, Security and Sovereignty of Canada Operations aim to ensure constant monitoring and conspicuous presence of military forces in Canadian territory, including the Arctic, through the application of military power. When necessary, this Program also delivers localized responses against detected aggressors that threaten the security of Canadians, the sovereignty of Canada, or the interests of the Canadian Government. Typical results are achieved through the employment of force elements with the requisite Defence capabilities to conduct surveillance operations; maritime, land, and air patrols; and operations to assert Canada’s sovereignty. Results are typically achieved through this Program by focused execution of: national intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance operations; presence operations; and intercept operations.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

 Difference
(actual minus planned)

178,693,580 77,259,347 (101,434,233)

Note: The difference is primarily due to the overestimation of planned spending in this Sub-Sub-Program. The difference is also due to a reduction in aerospace operational activities. This reduction is offset by an increase in aerospace readiness activities under Sub-Sub-Program 3.1.3: Aerospace Roles – Readiness Sustainment.

 

2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 1,486 1,224 (262)
Civilian 17 1 (16)
TOTAL 1,503 1,225 (278)

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  

Actual Results

Canada’s territory is secure and protected through presence, surveillance and localized responses % of Commander's Intent (Operational Objectives) that have been met 90 - 100% 100%
% of Stated Operational Effects achieved 90 - 100% 100%
% assigned critical tasks completed 90 - 100% 100%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Program performance was assessed against the goal of achieving 90 percent success against three key indicators. Ongoing defence security and sovereignty missions achieved 100 percent of operational objectives, operational effects and assigned critical tasks, ensuring that immediate response forces remained capable of deterrence, available to deliver localized response and able to enhance or reinforce monitoring and surveillance functions.

The Arctic remains a region free of conflict; yet it is not immune to the effects of international challenges. It is in the interest of all Arctic states to ensure that it remains a region of cooperation and stability. Through various Arctic sovereignty operations and exercises, Defence addressed the organizational priority Ensuring Sustainable Operational Excellence both at Home and Abroad for the Defence of Canada and the Protection of Canadians. In 2014-15, Defence demonstrated Canada’s ability to exercise sovereignty in the Arctic region, enhanced the CAF’s ability to operate in the Arctic, strengthened and developed whole-of-government partnerships, and maintained interoperability amongst northern partners.

Highlights for FY 2014-15 include:

  • Operation NUNALIVUT, the annual exercise consisting of high Arctic sovereignty patrols, took place between April 2 and May 3. Approximately 250 CAF members were deployed to three locations in the Resolute Bay area of Nunavut.  Operation NUNALIVUT combines air, sea, and land operations with Canadian Rangers from 1 Canadian Ranger Patrol Group. As experts of living and operating on the northern land, the Rangers provide mentorship and expertise to southern troops.
  • Operation NEVUS, an annual exercise, took place between June 1 and July 2. A CAF technical team was deployed to Ellesmere Island to perform essential and corrective maintenance on the High Arctic Data Communications System - a critical communication link between the Canadian Forces Station Alert and Ottawa.
  • Operation NUNAKPUT took place between June 15 and July 27. The exercise’s focus was on developing both a maritime and air presence on the Great Slave Lake, the Mackenzie River, and the Beaufort Sea region. It was conducted by Joint Task Force (North) in coordination with the Canadian Coast Guard, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Environment Canada, and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.
  • Operation NANOOK, the largest sovereignty exercise in Canada's North, was conducted from August 20 to 29 in York Sound and the Davis Strait, Nunavut. It involved more than 800 participants, including personnel from all branches of the CAF, a ship from the Royal Danish Navy, a surveillance aircraft from the United States Navy, as well as numerous federal, territorial and regional governments. Operation NANOOK 14 promoted interoperability with other government departments, international partners, and local authorities to increase northern safety and security.
  • Operation QIMMIQ took place throughout the year. During the summer, HMCS Shawinigan and Kingston sailed Canadian Arctic waters and conducted surveillance and presence operations. The two ships sustained a presence of 50 days north of the 60th parallel. HMCS Shawinigan transited further north than any other ship in Royal Canadian Navy history, reaching the 80th parallel in the Kennedy Channel. With HMCS Kingston transiting the Victoria Strait, this deployment also marks the farthest west that any maritime coastal defence vessel has gone to date. In addition to aerial and naval patrols, the 1st Canadian Ranger Patrol Group conducted land patrols across the Canadian Arctic throughout the year.

For a list of current operations 20, please see the Defence website.

Sub-Sub-Program 1.1.3: Ongoing Defence Operations through NORAD

Ongoing Defence Operations through NORAD seek to provide for the defence of North America in combination with the United States through the North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) in accordance with the North American Aerospace Defence agreement. This agreement provides co-ordinated bi-national delivery of both aerospace and maritime warning capabilities as well as related control capabilities to the Governments of Canada and the United States in order to protect against threats that may impact the North American continent. The aerospace warning and control capabilities applied through this Program typically detect, identify, monitor, track, deter, intercept, divert and neutralize manned or unmanned air-breathing vehicles that threaten air sovereignty. They also detect and monitor airborne and maritime vessels that are suspected of illegal drug trafficking and human trafficking/illegal immigrants, and relay information to civilian law enforcement agencies. The maritime warning capabilities applied through this Program provide shared awareness and a mutual understanding of activity within maritime approaches, marine areas, and inland waterways that are in the jurisdictions of Canada and the United States. This Program is conducted within the framework of the North Atlantic Treaty and therefore is also a key aspect of trans-Atlantic security and defence.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

 Difference
(actual minus planned)

81,686,154 91,037,585 9,351,431
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 650 641 (9)
Civilian 1 1 0
TOTAL 651 642 (9)

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
NORAD Defence capabilities reduce the risk of threats to Canada's security and sovereignty % of Canadian obligations/commitment that have been met in accordance with bi-national agreements and plans 90 - 100% 100%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Program performance was assessed against the goal of meeting 90 percent of Canadian obligations and/or commitments in accordance with bi-national agreements and plans. As a strong and reliable defence partner, Defence successfully met 100 percent of its obligations. The Canadian Armed Forces continued to successfully employ forces to support the NORAD mission of aerospace warning, aerospace control, and maritime warning in the defence of North America.

FY 2014-15 highlights include:

  • In the performance of aerospace missions, including Operation NOBLE EAGLE and Northern Sovereign Operations, Defence defended approaches to North America over Canadian airspace and safeguarded key national terrain by employing a combination of armed fighters, aerial refueling, Airborne Warning and Control System surveillance platforms, and ground-based Air Defense Sector surveillance detection capabilities. The Canadian NORAD Region was regularly exercised, with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, Public Safety Canada, Transport Canada and the Canadian Joint Operations Command through Exercises VIGILANT SHIELD, and ARDENT SENTRY and various small training events. For information on NORAD training see Sub-Sub-Program 3.2.6: International and Domestic Interoperability Training.
  • In the past year, the Canadian NORAD Region successfully scrambled for Real World aerospace control missions and had flown successful Operation NOBLE EAGLE intercepts. Detect, scramble, and intercept operations demonstrated our ability and intent to defend the northern approaches of Canada and the U.S. and contributed to our strategic deterrence of aerospace threats to North America.
  • NORAD conducts its maritime warning mission on a global scale through an extensive network of information sharing on potential maritime threats to the U.S. and Canada. NORAD's execution of this mission still continues to mature.
  • To address NORAD's ability to deter, detect and defeat current and emerging threats, the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and Canada's Chief of the Defence Staff directed in June 2013, that a NORAD Strategic Review be conducted. The review was completed in December 2014 and offered a candid assessment of the state of NORAD and identified specific areas requiring attention for NORAD to evolve to meet emerging threats. It was researched and written in collaboration with many stakeholders.
Sub-Sub-Program 1.1.4: Ongoing Continental Defence Operations in Cooperation with the United States

Ongoing Continental Defence Operations in Cooperation with the United States aim to protect Canada and North America in accordance with agreements with the United States, and Central and South American nations where applicable, that are outside the purview of North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD). Results are achieved through the employment of forces with the requisite military capabilities to conduct daily continental operations where threats along air, land and sea approaches to Canadian territory are detected, identified, monitored, tracked, deterred, intercepted, diverted and neutralized, as required. This Program includes participation in the US-led Joint Interagency Task Force (South) as well as the employment of military capabilities in support to the United States in accordance with requirements and emergency/contingency plans established though bi-lateral agreements. Results may sometimes also be achieved through application of military capabilities in co-ordination with South American and Caribbean nations.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

 Difference
(actual minus planned)

75,210,521 31,148,039 (44,062,482)
Note:  The difference is primarily due to the overestimation of planned spending in this Sub-Sub-Program.
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 397 384 (13)
Civilian 4 0 (4)
TOTAL 401 384 (17)

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
Defence capabilities applied in cooperation with continental partners reduce the risks to Canada and uphold the interests of the Canadian government % of Commander's Intent (Operational Objectives) that have been met 90 - 100% 100%
% of Stated Operational Effects achieved 90 - 100% 100%
% assigned critical tasks completed 90 - 100% 100%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Program performance was assessed against the goal of achieving 90 percent of operational objectives, effects and assigned critical tasks. The defence of North America is integral to the protection of Canada. By working with Canada’s closest ally, the United States, Defence successfully achieved 100 percent of operational objectives, effects, and assigned critical tasks contributing to the defence of the continent. Defence and security relations between the two countries are longstanding and well-entrenched, contributing to one of the closest bilateral defence relationships in the world.

Defence continued to employ forces to conduct continental operations, including through Canada‐United States agreements, to monitor, track and intercept along air, land and sea approaches to Canadian territory.

Highlights for FY 2014-15 include:

  • Operation CARIBBE 21 highlights Canada’s dedication to supporting Joint Interagency Task Force (South) in combating transnational criminal organizations and maintaining stability in the Americas. Since November 2006, the Canadian Armed Forces have remained committed to working with Western Hemisphere and European partners to interdict illegal maritime and air traffic in the Gulf of Mexico, the Caribbean Sea, and Eastern Pacific and Western Atlantic Oceans.
  • Ten Royal Canadian Navy ships and four Royal Canadian Air Force Canadian Patrol Aircraft (CP-140) deployed on Operation CARIBBE and assisted in the disruption and seizure of 9,997 kg of cocaine and 544 kg of marijuana. Notable achievements include:
    • HMCS Whitehorse, in company with USS GARY, each with embarked United States Coast Guard Law Enforcement Detachments, assisted in recovering 5,284 kg of cocaine from a small freighter sized vessel in the Eastern Pacific Ocean. This was the largest recovery in 2015. An additional interdiction of 600 kg of cocaine amounts to a total interception of 5,884 kg for this team.
    • Through a diplomatic note process, two CP-140 aircraft conducted overflights of Costa Rica from the Eastern Pacific Ocean to the Western Caribbean Sea and back, in order to track high priority event cases. During this time, one CP-140 was also able to track and report on a "go-fast" boat with 1,600 kg of cocaine onboard.

Sub-Program 1.2: International Combat Operations

International Combat Operations aim to achieve timely strategic effects in support of Canada’s national interests and in accordance with Canadian values, as directed by the Government of Canada through the delivery of military power outside of the domestic or continental setting, typically in response to armed aggression or the potential for armed aggression. Results are achieved through the application of Defence capabilities, in concert with national and international partners, within the context of military operations across the globe. Typically the military operations under this Program are conducted to enhance global peace and security, counter international terrorism, assist failing states, or defuse intra- and interstate conflicts that may threaten Canada’s national security interests. These operations are usually delivered in the context of: a United Nations (UN) resolution; Canada’s membership in the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO); or other international agreements. Some of the operations conducted under this Program are considered routine while other operations occur on a contingency basis. Routine operations occur on an ongoing basis whereas contingency operations may be planned for but occur only in response to a particular event or upon specific request from the Government of Canada. Therefore not all of the sub-programs under this Program may contain significant operations every fiscal year. This Program is bound by several federal laws, regulations, policies, and international conventions, agreements and laws, like the Law of Armed Conflicts, that pertain to the conduct military forces in armed conflict.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

286,537,020 173,172,331 (113,364,689)
Note: The difference is due in part to variances explained under sub-sub-programs 1.2.1: International Operations over Extended Periods and 1.2.3: Ongoing Defence Operations through Standing NATO Commitments.
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 1,179 1,173 (6)
Civilian 14 5 (9)
TOTAL 1,193 1,178 (15)
Note: Due to rounding, figures may not add up to total shown.

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
The application of Defence capabilities against armed threats outside of North America advance the interests of the Canadian Government % of International Combat Operations that successfully achieve their operational objectives against risks from armed threats 90 - 100% 99%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The International Combat Operations Program’s performance was assessed against the goal of 90 percent of operations successfully achieving operational objectives against risks from armed threats. 99 percent of international combat operations met their objectives. Defence continued to meet personnel requirements to support United Nations, NATO, and independent missions, apply defence capabilities against armed threats outside of North America, and advance the interests of the Government of Canada.

Details regarding international operations are reported under the sub-sub-programs below. International missions are further highlighted on the Operations 22 page of the Defence website.

For more information on the Incremental Costs for Major Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) International Operations 23, see the Defence website.

Sub-Sub-Program 1.2.1: International Operations over Extended Periods

International Operations over Extended Periods aim to meet expectations agreed upon by the Canadian Government and foreign partners, which include allied nations, alliance organizations and the United Nations. Results are achieved through the application of Defence capabilities by force elements outside of the domestic or continental setting. The force elements that achieve this Program’s results are organized into portfolios according to the environments in which they operate – the most fundamental of which are the maritime, land and aerospace environments. There are also force elements that operate across these domains which include joint, common and special force elements. The operations conducted under this Program occur over extended periods during which time certain force elements from across the portfolio are tailored, delivered and sustained within a forum that typically also includes force elements provided by international partners. Examples of past operations conducted as part of this Program are those conducted in Afghanistan and Bosnia.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

210,801,459 130,050,831 (80,750,628)
Note: The difference is primarily due to the overestimation of planned spending in this Sub-Sub-Program.
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 710 798 88
Civilian 10 0 (10)
TOTAL 720 798 78

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
The application of Defence capabilities against armed threats outside of North America over extended periods advance the interests of the Canadian Government % of Commander's Intent (Operational Objectives) that have been met 90 - 100% 98%
% of Stated Operational Effects achieved 90 - 100% 100%
% assigned critical tasks completed 90 - 100% 98%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Program performance was assessed against the goal of achieving 90 percent of operational objectives, effects, and assigned critical tasks. Defence successfully met expectations in the conduct of integrated global operations in concert with national and international partners to achieve timely and decisive effects in support of Canada’s national interests as directed by the Government of Canada. Defence met personnel requirements to support United Nations, NATO, and independent missions for all but two missions. Operation GLADIUS, Canada's mission to the United Nations Disengagement Observer Force, was zero manned due to Force Protection concerns. Operation SATURN, Canada’s mission to UNAMID, was zero manned due to constraints imposed by the Government of Sudan that prevented personnel deployment:

The FY 2014-15 highlights include:

  • Operation IMPACT 24 is the CAF support to the Middle East Stabilization Force – the multinational military coalition against ISIS in the Republic of Iraq and in Syria. Approximately 600 CAF personnel were deployed as part of Joint Task Force-Iraq, which included:  provision of planning and liaison personnel to work with the U.S. and other coalition partners; aircrew support elements; command and control; logistics; and an Air Task Force. In addition, 69 CAF special forces members were deployed to Iraq to advise and assist Iraqi security forces in their fight against ISIS. The Air Task Force included six CF-188s, one CC-150T Polaris, and two CP-140 Auroras. The effects achieved included vehicles, weapons and artillery pieces; ISIS fighting positions; ammunition caches; staging areas; equipment; and improvised explosives device factories. Moreover, between 28 August and 26 September, Royal Canadian Air Force aircraft conducted 25 flights, delivering more than 1,600,000 pounds of military supplies donated by allied countries to Iraq.
  • The Canadian Armed Forces sustained relevant forces to contribute to a number of global operations including Op ARTEMIS 25, Op CALUMET 26, Op KOBOLD 27, Op CROCODILE 28, Op SOPRANO 29, Op SNOWGOOSE 30, Op FOUNDATION 31, Op HAMLET 32, Op JADE 33, and Op PROTEUS 34 

Sub-Sub-Program 1.2.2: International Crisis and Surge Response Operations

International Crisis and Surge Response Operations aim to respond to immediate international crises with the potential for armed conflict through the delivery of Defence capabilities. As with the International Operations over Extended Periods Program, Defence capabilities are applied outside of the continent by this Program through the employment of force elements, as appropriate, from the maritime, land and aerospace environments and the joint, common and special force domains. However, the operations undertaken under this Program are expected to be of much shorter duration and often require what is called a surge response. These operations are typically undertaken at the request of the Canadian Government to meet particular expectations which are usually connected to the support of foreign partners which includes allied nations, alliance organizations and the United Nations. The recent operation in Libya is an example of an operation conducted as part of this Program.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

10,339,901 3,156,865 (7,183,036)
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 47 60 13
Civilian 0 0 0
TOTAL 47 60 13

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
The application of Defence capabilities against armed threats outside of North America in crisis and surge operations advance the interests of the Canadian Government % of Commander's Intent (Operational Objectives) that have been met 90 - 100% 100%
% of Stated Operational Effects achieved 90 - 100% 100%
% assigned critical tasks completed 90 - 100% 100%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Program performance was assessed against the goal of achieving 90 percent of operational objectives, effects, and assigned critical tasks. Defence was successful in meeting program performance.

FY 2014-15 highlights include:

  • In September 2014, deployment for Operation IMPACT began with an initial 30 day commitment. Canadian Special Forces members provided strategic and tactical advice to Iraqi forces before they commenced tactical operations against ISIS. The resources associated with these activities are reported under Sub-Sub-Program 1.2.1: International Operations over Extended Periods.
Sub-Sub-Program 1.2.3: Ongoing Defence Operations through Standing NATO Commitments

Ongoing Defence Operations through Standing NATO Commitments aim to provide for the ongoing defence of Canada and protect the interests of the Government of Canada through routine participation as an active member of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO). Results are achieved by representing Canadian interests in: defence policies and plans; military standards and doctrine, and best practices; fostering defence diplomacy and international defence relations; and providing Defence capabilities for ongoing operations. Specifically, Canadian interests in defence policy and planning matters are delivered through the Canadian Joint Delegation to NATO and through representation on the NATO Headquarters International Military Staff which facilitates the framing of NATO defence issues in ways commensurate with Canadian interests. Canada’s representation on various NATO organizations also provides an avenue for development of defence policy advice within Canada as well as the progression of defence relations and opportunities to leverage capability development initiatives. A key aspect of this Program is the delivery of Canadian force elements to ongoing NATO operations and to NATO’s response force (NRF) which provides rapid military response to emerging crisis as part of the NATO crisis response system. However, this Program does not include participation in extended or crisis response operations that are instead captured under the International Operations Over Extended Periods Program or the International Crisis and Surge Response Operations Program. This Program operates within the framework of the North Atlantic Treaty and the National Defence Act.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

65,395,660 39,964,635 (25,431,025)
Note: The difference is primarily due to where actual spending for military personnel engaged in Operation REASSURANCE is reported under sub-sub-programs 2.1.3: Non-Combatant Evacuation Operations and 3.2.6: International and Domestic – Interoperability Training.
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 421 315 (106)
Civilian 4 5 (1)
TOTAL 425 320 (105)
Note: The FTEs for Operation REASSURANCE are reported under sub-sub-programs 2.1.3: Non-Combatant Evacuation Operations and 3.2.6: International and Domestic – Interoperability Training.

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
International cooperation and active participation in the NATO community improve global peace and security % of ongoing services provided through NATO where Canadian contributions are on track to successfully achieve objectives 90 - 100% N/A
Note: The Program’s performance indicator does not support measurement as written, due in part to the lack of a single repository of data and no mechanism to assess performance. Defence has since taken appropriate action to correct the issue and developed new metrics that will take effect in FY 2016-17.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

As one of NATO’s founding members, Canada has been, and remains, a leader in the Alliance. The Canadian Armed Forces contributes to NATO providing modern, deployable capabilities to allied missions and highly trained personnel to its command structure. Canada’s priority is to ensure that the Alliance remains modern, flexible and agile to face the threats of today and tomorrow. This drives all our engagement at NATO, including our support of the Readiness Action Plan and our efforts on NATO’s reform and partnerships agendas.

FY 2014-15 highlights include:

  • In April 2014, NATO began to implement a series of military measures to reinforce NATO’s collective defence in response to Russian aggression towards Ukraine. As part of Operation REASSURANCE 35 Canadian Armed Forces assets were offered in support of NATO assurance measures.
    • Air Task Force (ATF) Romania was stood up in May 2014 in Câmpia Turzii, Romania, and included six CF-188 Hornet fighter aircraft and 200 personnel. The ATF conducted interoperability training with NATO allies, including the Romanian Air Force, in the areas of air defence, air superiority, aerospace testing and evaluation, and tactical support. In September 2014, the ATF relocated to augment the Block 36 of the NATO-led Baltic Air Policing mission in Šiauliai, Lithuania. ATF Lithuania retained approximately 135 personnel, four CF-188 Hornet fighter jets, and a mission support element to preserve the integrity of the airspace of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania, and to react to any intrusions.
    • At sea, HMCS Regina, Toronto and Fredericton took turns operating with NATO Standing Maritime Forces including such activities as surveillance and monitoring, regional defence and diplomatic engagement, and capacity building. HMCS Fredericton is the first modernized high-readiness frigate to deploy overseas in support of Government of Canada objectives.
    • 20 CAF operational planners reinforced the planning functions of the Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe and its ability to monitor events in the region.
    • Canadian Army soldiers deployed to Eastern and Central Europe to take part in a variety of training events between May and December 2014. For details, see Sub-Sub-Program 3.2.6: International and Domestic - Interoperability Training.
  • In May 2014, the Chief of the Defence Staff provided NATO international staff with a letter indicating CAF contributions to the NATO Response Force commitments out to 2017.

  • The Department provided ongoing support to advance Canada’s defence interests at NATO, including informed advice and support to the Chief of the Defence Staff and the Minister of National Defence for their participation at NATO meetings, in particular for the NATO Summit in September 2014. The Department further supported the participation of the Minister of National Defence and the Chief of the Defence Staff for their participation in meetings of NATO Defence Ministers and Chiefs of Defence. The Prime Minister of Canada, the Minister of National Defence and the Chief of the Defence Staff also participated in the NATO Summit in Wales from 4 to 5 September 2014. Departmental advice and support provided for these engagements enabled Canada to advance its interests in the taking of key Alliance decisions.

Sub-Program 1.3: Ongoing Centralized Operations and Operational Enablement

The Ongoing Centralized Operations and Operational Enablement Program ensures that programs delivering Defence Combat and Support Operations and delivering Defence Services and Contributions to Government have: clearly aligned operational objectives; a well-defined national command and communications structure; a balanced portfolio of resources and information; and access to the operational support capabilities, so that operations can be accomplished with an acceptable degree of risk. Results are achieved through the application of Defence capabilities that enable the delivery of strategic control, national command, diplomatic support, and provide operational support which includes the delivery of intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

741,815,072 856,746,069 114,930,998
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 2,617 2,556 (61)
Civilian 896 654 (242)
TOTAL 3,513 3,210 (303)
Note: Due to rounding, figures may not add up to total shown. The difference is due in part to the variance explained under Sub-Sub-Program 1.3.4: Military Diplomacy and Global Engagement.

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
Risks to the sustainment of force elements and optimal application of Defence capabilities are mitigated % score on the Centralized Operations and Operational Enablement Evaluation Index 85 - 100% 95%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Defence continued to work to enhance capabilities within the key joint enablers of Joint Command and Control, Joint Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance, and Operational Support.

FY 2014-15 highlights include:

  • Defence furthered the development of the capability to form a deployable Multinational Joint Integrated Task Force headquarters. Built on the framework of 1st Canadian Division headquarters, this initiative is linked to efforts underway to refine the Division's Support Plan to Contingency Plan JUPITER - the contingency plan for expeditionary operations that guides operational level force employment up to and including full spectrum operations.
  • Defence continued to develop and refine force generation/force employment models for a deployable Joint Task Force headquarters and a Joint Task Force Support Component. Force employment models are to be created by mid-November 2015.
Sub-Sub-Program 1.3.1: Overarching Command and Control of Domestic and International Operations

Overarching Command and Control of Domestic and International Operations seek to ensure there is congruency between operational objectives and higher-level strategic goals associated with the defence of Canada, the protection of Canadian sovereignty, and the interests of the Canadian Government by providing overarching control functions to military operations. Results are achieved by providing the rules and constraints that control each operation; coordinating the provision and allocation of resources; engaging with operational-level partners and other stakeholders to ensure unity of action; and ensuring that structures and processes are in place to manage risk. The products and services provided by this Program sustain Defence by enabling the Defence Combat and Support Operations Program and the Defence Services and Contributions to Government Program to deliver military efforts.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

286,738,563 245,001,454 (41,737,109)
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 858 779 (79)
Civilian 117 123 6
TOTAL 975 902 (73)

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
Command and control capability sufficient to achieve the strategic goals, outcomes and objectives is maintained and executed as required to conduct Defence Combat and Support Operations and deliver Defence services % score on the Command and Control of Domestic and International Operations Evaluation Index 90 - 100% 94%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Through various Arctic sovereignty initiatives, Defence addressed the organizational priority Ensuring Sustainable Operational Excellence both at Home and Abroad for the Defence of Canada and the Protection of Canadians.

FY 2014-15 highlights include:

  • With multiple sources of strategic and operational guidance related to the North, and as the supported command for all Northern operations other than aerospace defence, Defence’s Canadian Joint Operations Command (CJOC) initiated an iterative planning process to develop and maintain a five-year plan for the North in order to better synchronize the activities of the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) and the collaboration with other government departments and the international community. In February 2015, CJOC released its annual update of the Plan for the North. This plan serves as overarching guidance for CAF activities in the North and links those activities to the activities and initiatives of domestic and international strategic partners.
  • As part of the Plan for the North, a horizon 1 campaign plan was developed. This plan enhances Joint Task Force North’s ability to command and support joint operations in its Area of Responsibility, near term options surveillance, all domain awareness, situational awareness to anticipate potential incidents, the range of CAF capabilities, and the ways in which expertise in northern operations and support can be developed.
  • Defence worked collaboratively with other government departments and agencies on tasks identified in the Northern Employment and Support Plan. These activities included providing maritime support to:
    • Environment Canada in the first ever Wildlife Patrol in Northern Marine Protected Areas and to deploy ocean data acquisition buoys in Davis Strait located in the northern arm of the Labrador Sea;
    • Parks Canada’s vessels in the search for the Franklin expedition; and
    • Canadian Hydrographic Services in the vicinity of Pond Inlet as part of their efforts to map the Arctic.
  • In further support for the tasks identified in the Northern Employment and Support Plan, the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) continued the development of two air expeditionary wings and a number of expeditionary capability enabling initiatives.
  • In 2014, the Canadian Army (CA) stood up the Arctic Training Centre which provides the CAF with access to a state-of-the-art training facility capable of supporting individual and collective arctic and cold weather training with enough equipment and communication infrastructure to serve as a forward operating base if required. The facility also contributes to scientific research. The facility is able to accommodate up to 140 personnel. The first operating season began in January 2014 with the delivery of arctic-related courses for the CA and the RCAF. Exercise SABRE GLACE 36, Operation NUNALIVUT 37 and Operation NANOOK 38 were also staged from Canadian Armed Forces Arctic Training Centre.

To successfully achieve the Program’s expected results:

  • Defence continued to advance refinements of the consolidation of CJOC, including the internal reorganization of the headquarters and alignment of the division of tasks related to Operational Support from tactical through operational to strategic levels.
  • Defence continued to seek to refine expeditionary command and control models through the continued improvement of contingency plan Jupiter. CONPLAN JUPITER will continue to be improved through JOINTEX, biennial activities and a keystone CAF posture and readiness activity to evaluate and confirm operational mission readiness. As an opportunity exists to practice real command of joint and combined forces, JOINTEX 15 will integrate NATO’s Connected Force Initiative flagship exercise TRIDENT JUNCTURE 15.  During this reporting period, CJOC has conducted planning activities related to CAF participation in JOINTEX 15 and TRIDENT JUNCTURE 15, including participation in planning conferences and exercise writing boards.
  • Defence did not participate in the Interdepartmental Risk Assessment Working Group as originally planned as the group did not meet during the reporting period.

Sub-Sub-Program 1.3.2: Ongoing Defence Intelligence Operations

Ongoing Defence Intelligence Operations aim to increase security and situational awareness essential to Force protection. Results are achieved through surveys and analysis of the many dimensions of the current security environment.  It identifies critical patterns, synthesizes trends, and from this information establishes potential impacts, risks and opportunities to inform the execution of ongoing and contingency operations conducted under the Defence Combat and Support Operations Program and the Defence Services and Contributions to Government Program. It also informs the delivery, or potential delivery, of Defence capabilities in the future. Results are achieved through the collection, storage, protection, collation, analysis, and dissemination of intelligence information. These activities are enabled, in part, by collaboration and liaison with national and international partners. Besides supporting each military operation directly, the products and services provided by this Program sustain Defence by directly enabling the Overarching Control of Domestic and International Operations Program and the Operational Readiness Production Coordination and Control Program, and the Defence Capability Development and Research Program. This Program is primarily focused on National Defence but also supports Federal Departments/Agencies and international partners.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

 Difference
(actual minus planned)

178,674,901 202,465,779 23,790,878
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 1,207 1,235 28
Civilian 361 243 (118)
TOTAL 1,568 1,478 (90)

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsActual Results
Defence Intelligence clients, both civilian and military achieve information superiority Number of reports produced

> 5,000 reports

5,200
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Defence maintained the appropriate capabilities to ensure situational awareness of activities, operations, and events relevant to Government of Canada national security and CAF operational requirements.

During the reporting period, Defence produced over 5,000 reports consisting of products posted to a central Defence classified website, available for use by domestic and international audiences, which disseminates reports produced by Defence organizations with intelligence staff. Reports were published in a variety of formats, with a range of focuses and covered a variety of timeframes. Tailoring defence intelligence reports in this manner ensured that the Department’s defence intelligence community provided credible, timely, and integrated analysis of defence intelligence issues. Reports served not only Defence, but other government departments, and international allies, thereby enabling decision-makers to achieve information superiority concerning the security environment.

Canadian Forces Intelligence Command continued to lead departmental efforts to streamline defence intelligence activities by implementing processes designed to improve performance and realize efficiencies. These processes worked to establish a list of countries of interest to the defence intelligence community; capture the intelligence requirements for each country; and outline the resources being applied against each requirement. Together these processes work to ensure that decision-makers receive the intelligence support they require, while enabling the judicious employment of finite resources

Sub-Sub-Program 1.3.3: Operational Support Services

Operational Support Services aim to provide operational support services for the conduct of military operations. Results are achieved through the deployment and sustainment of forces to distant areas in response to domestic, continental and international operations. Operational support is provided to deployed force elements within a theatre of operations. This Program delivers Defence services such as Surveillance from Space and the provision of Cyber defence. Included in the Support Services is the establishment of Lines of Communications for facilitating coordination of procurement and delivery of a wide variety of materiel, personnel and information services that directly support the deployment and sustainment of military forces and the maintenance of Defence capabilities during military operations. Operational Support Services directly supports Defence.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

 Difference
(actual minus planned)

92,314,982 73,747,206 (18,567,776)

 

2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
 PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 298 274 (24)
Civilian 160 85 (75)
TOTAL 458 359 (99)

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
Defence operational support services are delivered to project and sustain military forces globally % of the time Operational Readiness was declared as planned by deployed Commanders 90 - 100% 100%
% time deployed camp facilities (bed-down of forces), logistics and administrative services, health services, personnel support services, communications services, contracts, multinational and host nation support arrangements, etc. are established in theatres of operation as initially planned 90 - 100% 85%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

From the earliest planning stages through to completion and mission closure, military operations of all kinds depend on a complex web of support activities for their success. Operational support provides task forces with the administrative, logistic, personnel support, and specialist services required to ensure effectiveness throughout their tour of duty.

The CAF participated in 35 missions throughout the year. All missions were declared operationally ready as planned. Operational support services were established in theatre as initially planned 85 percent of the time. Exercise MAPLE RESOLVE 39 was assessed below the performance target, resulting in minimal impact to readiness posture established through exercises, as a Table of Organization and Equipment (TO&E) was not fully sourced or filled. A TO&E is a document that prescribes the wartime mission, capabilities, organizational structure, and mission essential personnel and equipment requirements for military units.

Defence advanced the following initiatives to support Program Expected Results:

  • Work continues to operationally engage partners and allies to situate Operational Support Hubs that can offer flexibility and cost-efficient ways to launch and sustain international operations and respond to crises, such as natural disasters, in a timely manner. Operational Support Hubs 40 (OSH) are a series of pre-negotiated arrangements with other countries and service providers in those countries to facilitate the movement of people, materiel, equipment, and supplies in far-reaching locations.
  • To support Defence operations in the North, a directive was issued in August 2014 to guide development of Northern Operations Hub (NOH) Iqaluit. A Northern High Readiness Kit was purchased and prepared for rapid deployment. The Kit is a mobile warehouse designed to support personnel and equipment when units are deployed under conditions where normal support facilities are not available. Defence continued ongoing work to both identify potential capability gaps and to validate the NOH concept. Lessons learned from the establishment of NOH Iqaluit will inform the development of the NOH Network Master Implementation Plan.
  • Defence continues to develop a comprehensive program to ensure coherence with allies and enable CAF operations within the cyber environment, as well as staged growth (military and civilian) of the Cyber Force and a number of capital projects.
  • Canada continues to work closely with allies through a variety of forums to collect and share best practices and lessons learned and sustain international cyber engagements, particularly with 5-Eyes partners and NATO.
  • Australia, Canada, the United Kingdom, and the United States furthered their defence cooperation by establishing a partnership on combined space operations. This combined space operations partnership among our armed forces enables sharing of space-related information and resources to synchronize space operations and to provide enhanced awareness of the space environment. In particular, it will allow for more effective and coordinated use of their space capabilities through cooperation on activities such as identifying and understanding what objects are in space, ensuring uninterrupted satellite operations, and avoiding satellite collisions. Such activities will make a significant contribution towards a safer and more secure space environment while also enhancing mutual security. The partnership demonstrates the continued dedication and strong commitment of the partners to encouraging the responsible and peaceful use of space for all. 

For more information on support to operations 41, please see the Defence website.

Sub-Sub-Program 1.3.4: Military Diplomacy and Global Engagement

The Military Diplomacy and Global Engagement Program aims to achieve greater interoperability and enhanced delivery of Defence capabilities during on-going, contingency and potential operations in the future in order to support the defence of Canada and Canadian Interests.  Results are achieved through the establishment of new bi-national and multinational relations and the strengthening of existing key defence partnerships. This is accomplished through assistance to foreign partners in the form of military training, participation in international fora, the establishment of formal arrangements, the sharing of expertise and operational cooperation. The Military Diplomacy and Global Engagement Program also delivers support to Federal Departments and Agencies, foreign governments, international organizations and alliances.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

 Difference
(actual minus planned)

184,086,627 335,531,631 151,445,005
Note: The planned spending for FY 2014-15 was based on FY 2012-13 actual spending which did not include the global engagement training activities performed by the Royal Canadian Air Force. From FY 2013-14 and onwards, those activities were separated from Sub-Sub-Program 4.1.6: Military Personnel - Occupational Training and are now reported under Sub-Sub-Program 1.3.4: Military Diplomacy and Global Engagement.

2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 254 268 14
Civilian 258 202 (56)
TOTAL 512 470 (42)

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
Defence maintains itself as a reliable partner with allies and like-minded countries in enhancing international peace and security % of countries globally that report favourably towards Canada's Defence Engagement initiatives 90 - 100% N/A*
* Note: The Program’s performance indicator does not support measurement on the Global Engagement Strategy (GES), as there is no mechanism to assess partner country satisfaction. This issue was addressed during the 2014-2015 GES review, during which more appropriate performance measurements were considered. Defence has since taken appropriate action to correct the issue and developed new metrics that align with direction in the GES. These new metrics will take effect in FY 2016-17.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In support of operational excellence both at home and abroad, Defence works continuously to nurture and deepen existing partnerships, as well as to create new ones. These relations strengthen international and regional security while providing support to continental, NATO and UN led-missions, and enhancing Defence diplomacy activity.

FY 2014-15 highlights include:

  • The Canadian Joint Operations Command coordinated 117 global engagements with the majority of engagements in the Middle East, primarily in support of Operation IMPACT. More than 90 percent of these engagements included the established planning process, briefing of the principal and synchronization with the Strategic Joint Staff. All included discussions related to yielding benefits in terms of operational reach, agility and interoperability for CAF deployed missions.
  • Under Operation REASSURANCE, Defence continued to work with NATO Allies to enhance interoperability while showing resolve and solidarity against aggression. Canada is a strong supporter of NATO and is committed to doing its part as a member of the alliance.
  • Defence continued to collaborate with its partner states in the Arctic, particularly through bilateral engagements and various multilateral dialogues. For example, from 26 to 28 August 2014, the annual Arctic Security Forces Roundtable 42 (ASFR) was held in Sortland, Norway. Participants included the defence staffs from seven Arctic states and three observer nations. The ASFR is a collaborative forum designed to promote regional understanding, dialogue and cooperation among arctic states, enhancing the ability for participating nations to adapt to the changing environment and emerging missions. Canada has participated in the ASFR since 2011. While past iterations of the meeting focused on working groups with a variety of subjects in the safety and security realm, this year placed an emphasis on search and rescue capacities in the Arctic. The annual conference of the Northern Chiefs of Defence Staff, originally planned to be hosted by Iceland, was postponed outside of the reporting period.
  • The NATO Flying Training in Canada (NFTC) program continued to provide world-class pilot training that will prepare military pilots for air operations. Success of the program is measured by the on-time production of the contracted number of CAF and foreign pilots who achieve the required skill sets to progress to operational aircraft. For FY 2014-15, the NFTC program had a total of 198 student starts, of which 38 were foreign students.
  • Collaboration with NATO and the Allies continued on implementation of the Operations Logistics Chain Management concept, NATO's future operational logistics concept. Together with the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada, Defence participated in non-combatant evacuation operation coordination group venues in order to enhance international cooperation and exchange best practices with like-minded nations. Further, Defence conducted collaborative planning with allies to enhance interoperability, exchange best practices, and work toward defusing or reducing international tensions.
  • Global engagement work continued through the CANUS Integrated Force Initiative and NATO adaptation, training, and interoperability initiatives. The CAF worked with allies to enhance capabilities within the key joint enablers of Joint Command and Control, Joint Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance, and Operational Support, including ongoing development of the capability to form a Multinational Joint Integrated Task Force.
  • Defence undertook a review of the Global Engagement Strategy to guide its international defence diplomacy activities and promote prioritization and coherence in resource allocation. Over time, the dividends of defence diplomacy directly enable the execution of the defence mandate and support broader Government of Canada national security and foreign and trade policy priorities. In the same time period, Defence developed guidance on implementation of the renewed Global Engagement Strategy for inclusion in the Directive for CAF Force Posture and Readiness. The Global Engagement Strategy guidance was later signed by the Deputy Minister and the Chief of the Defence Staff. Oversight mechanisms are being developed as part of Defence’s Performance Management Framework.
  • Defence continued to work with like-minded partners in the context of the Proliferation Security Initiative to strengthen the international community’s resolve and capability to prevent the spread of weapons of mass destruction, including by hosting a capacity-building workshop for members of the Caribbean Community, with funding from the Global Partnership Program at the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development.
  • The Military Training and Cooperation Program conducted over 100 engagement activities involving more than 1,000 military personnel from partner countries. In so doing, it allowed the Defence Team to establish and maintain bilateral relations in support of departmental priorities and CAF operational requirements.
  • Following the endorsement of the second Canada-United Kingdom Joint Declaration of Intent by the Prime Ministers of Canada and of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, Canada and the UK engage in regular high-level dialogue under a framework for cooperation called the Partners in Defence Dialogue. This framework will continue to bring greater coherence to existing programs and initiatives, and will permit the consideration of new levels of cooperation and interoperability.
  • A Franco-Canadian Defence Cooperation Council was established, through the signature by Defence Ministers of a Technical Arrangement, to put in place a framework for strengthened bilateral security and defence cooperation and strategic defence dialogue. Through its creation with France of the Council, Defence has delivered on one of the key defence-related lines of activity identified in the Canada-France Enhanced Cooperation Agenda, announced by Prime Minister Harper and President Hollande in June 2013.

Program 2.0: Defence Services and Contributions to Government

The Defence Services and Contributions to Government Program aims to support the delivery of Canadian Government safety and security initiatives and encourage recognition and pride in Canada and the Canadian military. This is accomplished through the provision of unique Defence services in support of other elements of Government or the Canadian public. To encourage and share pride and awareness of Canada’s military heritage, contributions, and leadership, Defence provides unique services and opportunities for outreach, awareness, preservation and development. Defence unique services also include operations conducted to ensure or enhance the security, safety, stability and/or well-being of Canadians, or international populations in peril, in accordance with Canadian values and the interests of the Canadian Government, in situations where there may be a need to defend against armed threats but where this is not the primary focus. The operations are delivered through the employment of force elements to achieve a desired effect within specific contexts through execution of tasks according to understood concepts, doctrine and standards. The force elements delivered by Defence are organizational entities which are composed of members of the Canadian Armed Forces and in some cases personnel from the Department of National Defence. Force elements have different sizes and compositions according to the capabilities they must apply during an operation. Defence remains consistently ready to employ force elements under this Program however significant operations do not always occur every fiscal year.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Main Estimates Planned SpendingTotal Authorities Available for Use

Actual Spending
(authorities used)

 Difference
(actual minus planned)

407,959,810 407,959,811 438,816,642 497,418,597 89,458,786
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 1,243 1,356 113
Civilian 299 263 (36)
TOTAL 1,542 1,619 77
Note: Due to rounding, figures may not add up to total shown.

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
The application of Defence capabilities and services reduces the risk to the safety, security and prosperity of Canada, and to the stability of foreign populations % of Defence Service Operations and Defence Services that successfully met their objectives 90 - 100% 100%

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Activities within the Defence Services and Contributions to Government Program are detailed under each of the applicable sub-programs and sub-sub-programs.

Sub-Program 2.1: Disaster Relief and Humanitarian Operations

Disaster Relief and Humanitarian Operations aim to assist populations in distress in order to establish, re-establish or enhance the human safety and well-being through the use of military operations. Results are achieved through this Program by the employment of force elements with the requisite capabilities to minimize suffering, assist in recovery operations, facilitate synergies with other responding bodies, and conduct related support functions during natural disaster events, non-combat evacuation events, humanitarian emergencies, and other perilous situations as directed by the Government of Canada. Operations in this Program are bound by a number of federal and provincial laws, regulations, orders-in-council, federal policies, and international agreements.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

8,310,319 15,126,725 6,816,405
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 68 181 113
Civilian 1 1 0
TOTAL 69 182 113
Note: Due to rounding, figures may not add up to total shown.

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
The application of Defence capabilities mitigates the risks and conditions imposed by disasters and humanitarian incidents that impose suffering for Canadians and foreign populations % of Disaster Relief and Humanitarian Operations that successfully met their objectives 90 - 100% 100%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The Canadian Armed Forces responded to domestic emergencies in Manitoba and Ontario caused by flooding. Details regarding Operation LENTUS are reported under Sub-Sub-Program 2.1.1: Domestic and Continental Assistance and Response Operations.

The Canadian Armed Forces contributed to the Canadian whole-of-government contribution to fighting the Ebola outbreak in West Africa. Details regarding Operation SIRONA are reported under Sub-Sub-Program 2.1.2: International Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Response Operations.

Sub-Sub-Program 2.1.1: Domestic and Continental Assistance and Response Operations

Domestic and Continental Assistance and Response Operations aim to reduce suffering and to improve the well-being of members of the civil society living in North America. Results are achieved through the delivery of force elements with the capabilities to conduct domestic disaster relief operations. This Program delivers unique Defence capabilities through modular and scalable responses to mitigate a wide range of crises, associated with disasters. Operations in this Program will only occur if Defence is tasked by the Government of Canada. Response activities may include Defence services such as strategic air and sealift, aviation support, medical aid, logistic and engineering support, or provision of security assistance. Domestic and Continental Assistance and Response Operations are provided directly to Federal Departments and Agencies, other levels of government and continental partners.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

6,278,742 7,004,868 726,126
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 63 64 1
Civilian 0 0 0
TOTAL 63 64 1
Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
Defence has supported organizations that are leading interventions to save lives, prevent or alleviate human suffering following a natural or man-made disaster in Canada or North America % of Commander's Intent (Operational Objectives) that have been met 90 - 100% 100%
% of Stated Operational Effects achieved 90 - 100% 100%
% assigned critical tasks completed 90 - 100% 100%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

As part of the Canada First Defence Strategy, the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) provide critical assistance in support of civilian authorities during crises in Canada, whenever and wherever required. At all times Defence is in continuous liaison with Public Safety, the lead for federal emergency response, as well as with provincial and territorial authorities and other federal partners. When a major natural disaster overwhelms provincial and territorial response capacity, Operation LENTUS 43 is the CAF contingency plan that outlines the joint response to provide support. Under Operation LENTUS, the CAF intent is to have strategic effects in the affected location within 24 hours of receiving a request for assistance.

During FY 2014-15, Operation LENTUS fully achieved its stated operational objectives, operational effects, and assigned critical tasks.

  • In July, the CAF provided assistance to the Province of Manitoba 44 following their declaration of a state of emergency due to flooding. This support equated to 500 CAF members working alongside provincial authorities and volunteers in tasks as simple but important as sandbag production, which was key to protecting property in affected areas. Four CH-146 helicopters out of Edmonton were also employed in this operation as well as a CP-140 aircraft for information, surveillance, and reconnaissance of the situation.
  • On three other occasions, the CAF supported the Province of Ontario 45 in the assistance to communities in the James Bay region affected by flooding caused by ice jams during the spring season thaw. Between 7 and 8 May, the CAF, the Canadian Rangers, two CC-130 Hercules, and five Griffon aircraft successfully evacuated 90 people from Kashechewan and Fort Albany in northern Ontario. Between 10 and 12 May, 730 people were successfully evacuated from Kashechewan by military resources, and between 17 and 20 May, Canadian Rangers and two Hercules aircraft extracted 165 residents of the Attawapiskat First Nation.

While the CAF were not called upon to provide response or assistance to continental crises during the year, Canada continued to maintain its important bilateral framework with the United States. Known as the Canada-United States Civil Assistance Plan (CAP), it allows for scalable deployment of military personnel and assets from one nation to the other, upon request from one nation, to respond to a myriad of crises and events such as flooding, earthquakes, forest fires, and even the effects of a terrorist attack. CAP is another example of how the CAF can save lives, mitigate human suffering, and reduce damage to property.

Sub-Sub-Program 2.1.2: International Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Response Operations

International Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Response Operations aim to reduce suffering and to improve the well-being of members of the international civil society. Results are achieved through the delivery of force elements internationally with the capabilities to conduct disaster and humanitarian response operations in support of Government of Canada goals. This Program delivers unique Defence capabilities through modular and scalable responses tailored to address identified gaps in civilian humanitarian capacity. Operations in this Program will only occur if Defence is tasked by the Government of Canada. Response activities may include Defence services such as strategic air and sealift, aviation support, medical aid, logistic and engineering support, or provision of security assistance. International Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Response Operations are provided directly to Federal Departments and Agencies and international partners.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

1,363,195 598,654 (764,541)
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 4 8 4
Civilian 1 1 0
TOTAL 5 9 4

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
Defence supported nations outside Canada or North America to save lives, alleviate human suffering or mitigate property damage to critical infrastructure following a natural or human-made disaster % of Commander's Intent (Operational Objectives) that have been met 90 - 100% 100%
% of Stated Operational Effects achieved 90 - 100% 100%
% assigned critical tasks completed 90 - 100% 100%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

During FY 2014-15, Defence international humanitarian missions fully achieved stated operational objectives, operational effects and assigned critical tasks. In October 2014, the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) provided strategic airlift (C-177) assistance to the United Kingdom (UK) to deploy personnel, vehicles and equipment from the UK to Sierra Leone as well as strategic airlift (C-130J) assistance to the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development and Public Health Agency of Canada to deliver urgently required Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) (128,000 face shields) to Sierra Leone in support of the international effort to fight Ebola. At the end of December 2014, the CAF commenced operations as personnel augmentation to efforts undertaken by the United Kingdom Ministry of Defence to combat the spread of the Ebola virus disease in Sierra Leone. The CAF maintained a deployment of up to 40 health care and support staff to Operation SIRONA, the military component of the Canadian whole-of-government contribution to fighting the Ebola outbreak in West Africa. Canadian military doctors, nurses, medics, and support staff worked alongside their UK military partners in the United Kingdom’s Kerry Town Treatment Unit in Kerry Town, Sierra Leone, to treat local and international health care workers exposed to the disease until the governance of the treatment facility could be transferred to non-governmental organizations working in Sierra Leone. In addition, Defence Research Development Canada provided funding to a number of efforts headed by the Public Health Agency of Canada to advance the development of Ebola treatments, including two of the three antibodies on which Zmapp, the experimental drug treatment, is based.

While the Canadian Armed Forces were not called upon to provide disaster response abroad during FY 2014-15, under Contingency Plan RENAISSANCE it remained ready for rapid deployment in the event of a decision by the Government of Canada to respond to a request from another nation for help. The plan delivers a rapid CAF response that is flexible enough to make an immediate positive impact at the scene of the disaster, and to continue helping people as the situation develops. The Government of Canada’s response to natural disasters abroad is coordinated by the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada in close partnership with core departments and agencies, including the Department of National Defence and the Privy Council Office.

Sub-Sub-Program 2.1.3: Non-Combatant Evacuation Operations
Non-Combatant Evacuation Operations aim to contribute to the security of Canadian citizens abroad. Results are achieved through the delivery of force elements with the requisite capabilities to conduct operations where the primary focus is the evacuation of Canadian Entitled Personnel or other non-combatants from hostile or potentially hostile environments. Operations in this Program will only occur if Defence is tasked by the Government of Canada. Non-Combatant Evacuation Operations are provided directly to Federal Departments and Agencies and Canadian citizens.

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

668,383 7,523,203 6,854,820
Note: The difference is due to an underestimation of planned spending in this Sub-Sub-Program. Actual spending represents expenditures for military personnel engaged in Operation REASSURANCE. Operation REASSURANCE activities were allocated to Sub-Sub-Program 1.2.3: Ongoing Defence Operations through Standing NATO Commitments and to Sub-Sub-Program 3.2.6: International and Domestic – Interoperability Training.

 

2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force - 109 109
Civilian - 0 0
TOTAL - 109

109

Note:  Personnel were drawn from Ready Forces as required to provide Defence services under this Sub-Sub-Program. Actual human resources FTEs represent military personnel engaged in Operation REASSURANCE. Operation REASSURANCE activities were allocated to Sub-Sub-Program 1.2.3: Ongoing Defence Operations through Standing NATO Commitments and to Sub-Sub-Program 3.2.6: International and Domestic – Interoperability Training

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
Canadian Armed Forces successfully evacuated Canadian Entitled Personnel or other non-combatants from an affected region such as a security crisis or natural disaster area % of Commander's Intent (Operational Objectives) that have been met 90 - 100% N/A
% of Stated Operational Effects achieved 90 - 100% N/A
% assigned critical tasks completed 90 - 100% N/A
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

No Non-Combatant Evacuation operations took place during FY 2014-15. However, as discussed in Sub-Sub-Program 1.3.4: Military Diplomacy and Global Engagement, Defence participated in non-combatant evacuation operation coordination group venues in order to enhance international cooperation and exchange best practices with like-minded nations.

Sub-Program 2.2: Defence Services for Canadian Safety and Security

Defence Services for Canadian Safety and Security seeks to support Canadian Safety and Security initiatives across Canada through the delivery of force elements with the requisite capabilities to conduct military operations.  Results are achieved by responding to a wide variety of threats to the safety and security of Canadians as part of a larger government-wide effort or a focused intervention.  Examples of responses include providing, support to major Canadian events, anti-terrorism and terrorism event response, Search and Rescue operations, operations performed in direct support of other Government Departments and Agencies, as well as, related partnership programs such as the National Search and Rescue Program and the Canadian Safety and Security Program. Significant operations may not occur in all subordinate Program areas every fiscal year as Defence only performs support operations when tasked by the Government of Canada.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

111,282,984 95,134,974 (16,148,010)

 

2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 591 613 22
Civilian 74 62 (12)
TOTAL 665 675 10
Note: Due to rounding, figures may not add up to total shown.

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
The application of Defence capabilities enhances the capacity, increases the abilities, and reduces risks to the successful fulfillment of the mandates of other elements of government % of Defence Services for Canadian Safety and Security that successfully met their objectives 90 - 100% 100%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Activities within the Defence Services for Canadian Safety and Security Program are detailed under each of the applicable sub-sub-programs.

Sub-Sub-Program 2.2.1: Counter Terrorism, Terrorism Event Response and Consequence Management Operations

Counter Terrorism, Terrorism Event Response and Consequence Management Operations aim to contribute to the protection of Canada, Canadians and Canadian interests from terrorist activity.  Results are achieved through the conduct of counter terrorism operations both domestically and internationally.  This Program delivers unique Defence capabilities to support the Government of Canada and is an integral part of Canada’s Counter-terrorism Strategy. This Program ensures that Canada, through Defence, has the capability to prevent, pre-empt, disrupt, and, if not successful, prepare for and execute any deployment of Defence capability in response to terrorist activity at home or abroad. The breadth of Defence activities includes international areas of operation through various international and global engagements and domestic support to law enforcement. Counter Terrorism, Terrorism Event Response and Consequence Management Operations services are provided directly to Federal Departments and Agencies.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Note: Since operations in this Program are rare and unexpected, no expenditures are forecasted.
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force - - -
Civilian - - -
TOTAL - - -
Note: Personnel are drawn from Ready Forces as required to provide Defence services under this Program.

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
Canada, Canadian interests and the safety and security of Canadians at home and abroad are protected from terrorist threats and activities % of Counter Terrorism, Terrorism Event Response and Consequence Management operations that successfully met their objectives 90 - 100% 100%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Threats faced by Canadians, domestically and internationally, have increased over the last few years. So too has the need for the Government of Canada to have the widest spectrum of possible options available to them to prevent, deter, prepare for, and if necessary, respond to any terrorist activity at home or abroad.

Program results are enabled through Special Operations readiness, sustainment, and capability development. Special Operations and its effects are achieved across the Defence Program Alignment Architecture.

Details regarding how Special Operations achieve and perform assigned tasks are classified.

Sub-Sub-Program 2.2.2: Assistance to Major Canadian Event Operations

Assistance to Major Canadian Event Operations aim to contribute to the Defence of Canada and the security of Canadian citizens through the provision of security and related support for major events. Results are achieved through the maintenance of situational awareness and provision of naval, air, and land Defence capabilities. Operations in this Program will only occur if Defence is tasked by the Government of Canada. Assistance to Major Canadian Event Operations services are provided directly to Federal Departments and Agencies and other levels of Government.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

269,006 38,600 (230,406)
Note: Actual spending represents payments for military personnel activities that took place during the previous fiscal year.
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force - - -
Civilian - - -
TOTAL - - -
Note: Personnel are drawn from Ready Forces as required to provide Defence services under this Program.

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
Defence supported civilian authorities and other Government departments to ensure safety, security and defence of the nation and civilians during a major domestic event % of Commander's Intent (Operational Objectives) that have been met 90 - 100% N/A
% of Stated Operational Effects achieved 90 - 100% N/A
% assigned critical tasks completed 90 - 100% N/A
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

No Assistance to Major Canadian Event Operations took place in FY 2014-15.

Sub-Sub-Program 2.2.3: National Search and Rescue Program

The National Search and Rescue Program aims at continuously improving search and rescue services. Results are achieved by promoting collaboration and cooperation among federal, provincial and territorial organizations, and other stakeholders that provide search and rescue services, in order to achieve seamless search and rescue (SAR) services across Canada. This Program encompasses the services provided by the National Search and Rescue Secretariat. The role of the secretariat is to integrate the efforts of SAR partners. The National Search and Rescue Program services are provided directly to Federal Departments and Agencies, level of Governments, other partners from industry, academia, the volunteer community and not-for-profit organizations.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

9,992,710 3,698,381 (6,294,328)
Note:  The difference is due to Search and Rescue New Initiatives Fund activities that were allocated to Sub-Sub-Program 2.2.4: Search and Rescue Operations.
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 1 0 (1)
Civilian 19 20 1
TOTAL 20 20 0

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
SAR partners deliver seamless search and rescue services in Canada % of National Search and Rescue Program partners participating in National Search and Rescue programs 80 - 100% 89.3%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

To support the National Search and Rescue Program’s expected results, the National Search and Rescue Secretariat undertook the following activities during fiscal year 2014-15:

  • Remained committed to ensuring the organization continues to work with its partners, through regular meetings of the Interdepartmental Committee on Search and Rescue, the Ground SAR Council of Canada, and Senior Officials Responsible for Emergency Management to ensure the continual improvement of Canadian Search and Rescue services;
  • Prioritized its activities to focus on a National Prevention Strategy to ensure standardized prevention messaging across Canada;
  • Successfully delivered and achieved the aim of its core outreach initiative (SARscene);
  • Completed the implementation of the Search and Rescue Knowledge Management System to provide valuable information to SAR partners;
  • Addressed the recommendations from the inaugural Quadrennial Search and Rescue Review 46 by:
    • delivering a functional data acquisition and management system;
    • increasing the scope and reach of AdventureSmart;
    • providing a draft strategy endorsed by the Ground SAR Council of Canada;
    • establishing, by authorization of the Minister of National Defence, a contribution program for the sustainment of the SAR Volunteer Association of Canada; and
    • leveraging SARscene and the Search and Rescue New Initiatives Fund to focus on interoperability.
  • Successfully represented Canada in the international SAR Distress Alerting System through COSPAS-SARSAT and actively engaged with international and national partners, as well as key departmental interests in the successful advancement of the MEOSAR program and in maintaining the existing LEOSAR satellite distress alerting system.

For more information, please see the National Search and Rescue Secretariat website 47.

Sub-Sub-Program 2.2.4: Search and Rescue Operations

Search and Rescue Operations seek to provide assistance and safety to persons in distress. Results are achieved by delivering force elements with the requisite capabilities to provide aeronautical and maritime search and rescue (SAR) response operations within the Canadian Federal Area of Responsibility. This Program delivers the aeronautical and maritime SAR system which presently includes the several Joint Rescue Coordination Centres and other SAR facilities in conjunction with the Canadian Coast Guard. Search and Rescue Operations services are provided directly to Federal Departments and Agencies, other levels of Government and the General Public.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

74,069,376 64,046,129 (10,023,247)
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 565 590 25
Civilian 14 5 (9)
TOTAL 579 595 16

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators   Targets Actual Results
Successful delivery of Search and Rescue (SAR) capabilities within Canadian federal area responsibility was achieved % of coordinated maritime, aeronautical and joint response to SAR incidents that are deemed effective 90 - 100% 100%
% of mandated SAR operations that are successfully executed 90 - 100% 100%
% of critical tasks completed 90 - 100% 100%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Canada has one of the world’s largest and most challenging areas of search and rescue responsibility. Canada’s search and rescue area of responsibility covers 18 million square kilometres of land and sea, second largest only to Russia, and an area far greater than the size of continental Europe.

The primary SAR responsibility of CAF is the provision of aeronautical SAR and the coordination of the aeronautical and maritime SAR system. CAF resources may also assist in ground SAR efforts, medical evacuations, and other humanitarian incidents if asked and when available. CAF maintain a high standard of service in SAR operations: the response is always immediate, 24 hours per day, seven days per week.

2014-15 highlights include:

  • The Canadian Armed Forces continued to demonstrate operational excellence in saving lives through search and rescue operations and effectively coordinated 8,109 incidents.
  • In October 2014, a Russian container ship, the M/V Simushir, was adrift off Haida Gwaii. The SAR response to this complex incident was coordinated by the staff at the Joint Rescue Coordination Centre Victoria in Esquimalt, British Columbia. Members of the Canadian Armed Forces, Canadian Coast Guard, and others worked to ensure no lives were lost, there was no environmental damage, and the operation was carried out in a safe and professional manner. Numerous agencies at all levels of government and private industry were also involved, working behind the scenes to provide assistance that was invaluable in helping to make informed decisions.
  • For a second year, the CAF trialed an adjustment of SAR response time to better align with the hours and days during which SAR incidents are most likely to occur. A study from April 2014 confirmed that the occurrence of SAR incidents occur most frequently in the summer months, on weekends, as well as in afternoons or evenings. The trial was first tested in the Trenton Search and Rescue Region (SRR) in 2013. The trial expanded to include the Victoria SRR in 2014. Year one and two of the trial produced positive results by aligning SAR Squadrons schedules with peak activity, enabling SAR personnel to respond quicker when the demand is greatest.
  • In 2014-15, Defence completed several reviews of Search and Rescue activities. This includes a RCAF Search and Rescue Posture Review which examined the readiness of SAR units, an Evaluation of The RCAF Contribution to the SAR Program, which assessed the programs overall effectiveness and economy, and finally, follow-up to assess the progress on the Management Action Plans from the May 2009 Audit of the Fixed Wing Search and Rescue (FWSAR) Project which examined the processes in place for the acquisition of the new aircraft. All of these reviews highlighted the need for the procurement of new aircraft and ground equipment, and examined concerns with personnel manning levels.

For information on Search and Rescue related exercises, see Sub-Sub-Program 3.2.5: Joint – Integration Training. For more information on Defence Search and Rescue operations 48, please see the Defence website.

Sub-Sub-Program 2.2.5: Defence Services to Other Government Departments and Agencies

Defence Services to other Government Departments and Agencies aims to support the missions of other Government Departments and Agencies with a law enforcement mandate. Results are achieved through the maintenance of situational awareness and provision of naval, air, and land Defence capabilities in support of other Departments and Agencies as well as provincial governments and other levels of government. Support operations include activities such as counteracting illegal immigration, weapon and explosive trafficking, counter drug operations, the control of drift netting and other forms of illegal, unregulated, and unreported fishing. This Program also includes Aid of the Civil Power Operations which responds to any situation where there is a disturbance of the peace that is beyond the capacity of the civil authorities to mitigate. Defence Services to other Government Departments and Agencies are provided directly to Federal Departments and Agencies, provincial governments and other levels of government.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

2,548,320 338,330 (2,209,990)
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 23 23 0
Civilian 0 0 0
TOTAL 23 23 0

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
Defence supported civilian authorities and other Government departments to ensure safety, security and defence of the nation and civilians during intervention of illegal activities % of Commander's Intent (Operational Objectives) that have been met 90 - 100% 100%
% of Stated Operational Effects achieved 90 - 100% 100%
% assigned critical tasks completed 90 - 100% 100%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Eight missions were conducted during the year and successfully met operational objectives and effects and completed assigned critical tasks.

FY 2014-15 highlights include:

  • Operation DRIFTNET 49 is a recurring Canadian Armed Forces operation conducted in support of Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO). It delivers Canada's participation in multinational efforts to control driftnetting and other forms of illegal, unregulated and unreported fishing in the North Pacific Ocean. In support of DFO, the Canadian Armed Forces deployed one CP-140 Aurora aircraft and crew from 407 Long Range Patrol Squadron (Comox, British Columbia) to Hakodate airfield in Hokkaido Prefecture (Japan) from 11 May to 1 June 2014. They were supported by a Royal Canadian Air Force CC-177 Globemaster III aircraft to transport personnel and equipment. The mission resulted in the seizure of an illegal Chinese-registered vessel in possession of between 900 to 1,200 lbs of salmon and suspected of several domestic and international fishing violations. The CP-140 Aurora completed 11 patrols and flew a total of 108.1 hours. The detection of one High Seas Drift net vessel and two suspect vessels made this operation one of the most successful DRIFTNET deployments in many years.
  • Operation SABOT 50 is a Royal Canadian Mounted Police marijuana-eradication program conducted annually with support from the Canadian Armed Forces. Between 18 August and 19 September 2014, the CAF worked with the RCMP in Quebec and Ontario to conduct patrols. In total, police seized and destroyed 26,043 marijuana plants from multiple illegal grow sites in Ontario and Quebec.
  • Each winter, members of the Canadian Army deploy to Roger’s Pass during Operation PALACI 51 as part of Parks Canada’s avalanche-control program. From 24 November 2014 to 9 April 2015, two rotations of 17 members from the 1st Regiment, Royal Canadian Horse Artillery, based out of Shilo, Manitoba were deployed to maintain essential four-season commercial road and rail links between coastal British Columbia and the rest of Canada.
  • In November 2014, representatives from the Defence Team participated in the sixth annual Halifax International Security Forum in Halifax, Nova Scotia. The three-day event brought together over 300 prominent defence and international security experts and practitioners from around the world to discuss ideas and share insights on important global defence and security challenges. Topics discussed included the security situation in Eastern and Central Europe, the ongoing instability in the Middle East, terrorism, and the security implications of energy and natural resources shortage, among many others.
Sub-Sub-Program 2.2.6: Canadian Safety and Security Program

The Canadian Safety and Security Program aims to enhance Canadian public safety and security. Results are achieved through the delivery of scientific research, technology, analysis and systems in the context of a partnership program instituted by the Federal Government. This Program provides for the identification of capability gaps and the development of potential solutions in order to enhance the collective capabilities of the Canadian Government and its partners to be resilient against global and domestic public safety and security threats. Gaps are identified through risk and vulnerability assessments in consultation with communities of practice, central agencies and entities that develop policy, deliver safety and security operations, and synthesize intelligence. The Canadian Safety and Security Program services are provided directly to Federal Departments and Agencies.

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

24,403,573 27,013,534 2,609,961
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 1 0 1
Civilian 42 38 (4)
TOTAL 43 38 (5)

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
Emergency management, counter terrorism and law enforcement safety and security procedures, policies, strategies and action plans are evidence-based and risk-informed % score on the Exploitation of Advice and Knowledge Evaluation Index 80 - 100% 84%
Risk and capability based technology investments that are tested and operationalized support Canadian public safety and national security practitioners % score on the Exploitation and Transition of Technology Evaluation Index 80 - 100% 84%
Canadian Public Safety and Security Practitioners and their institutions are equipped to engage in critical - physical and cyber - infrastructure and border related decision-making processes % score on the Exploitation of Advice and Knowledge Evaluation Index 80 - 100% 86%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Performance for the Canadian Safety and Security Program (CSSP) was assessed against the goal of achieving 80 percent success against four internal project-level key indicators. Actual performance achieved was scope (82 percent), schedule (78 percent), budget (78 percent), and alignment (100 percent). The alignment of the CSSP to research and development priorities remains high due to strong engagement on priority setting with stakeholders in the public safety and security domains. The global emphasis of the program continues to focus the CSSP on science and technology investments that are aligned with priorities of the Canadian public safety and security communities and are balanced across the range of threats they face.

Highlights for the FY 2014-15 include:

  • In September 2014, the Government of Canada and the Government of the Kingdom of Sweden signed a new arrangement 52 that will allow them to work together on science and technology projects surrounding public safety and security issues of mutual interest.
  • The third Canada - U.S. Enhanced Resiliency Experiment (CAUSE III) consisted of experiments held over the course of November 2014. These experiments were based on two disaster scenarios – the first a Northeastern hurricane, and the second a wildfire in the Western Plains affecting Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Montana – and were conducted to strengthen cross-border coordination of emergency response efforts 53, including early identifications and warnings as well as us of new communication technology.

Canada employs a whole-of-government approach to continually assess and respond to security threats and hazards. Public Safety Canada spearheads this effort by coordinating the activities of federal departments and agencies, including the Department of National Defence, to protect Canadians and their communities, businesses and interests. The Canadian Armed Forces is continually adapting Force Protection measures to meet the demands of an evolving security environment. The safety and well-being of Defence personnel is a primary concern.

Sub-Program 2.3: Military Heritage and Outreach

The Military Heritage and Outreach Program aims to instil in the Canadian public a sense of pride by sharing Canada’s military history and traditions, showcasing Canadian military expertise and values, and developing leadership and good citizenship in Canada’s youth. Results are accomplished through the delivery of military awareness events, historical preservation and communication services, and youth training opportunities. This Program also contributes to a cohesive culture within the Canadian Armed Forces and the Department of National Defence and helps to build and promote the Canadian identity. The Military Heritage and Outreach Program is directed to the Canadian Armed Forces, the Canadian public and the international community.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

288,366,508 387,156,898 98,790,391
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 585 562 (23)
Civilian 224 200 (24)
TOTAL 809 762 (47)
Note: Due to rounding, figures may not add up to total shown.

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
Canadians are aware and can be proud of their military heritage and achievements % of favourable perception in Canadian Armed Forces public impression questions index 85 - 100% 89%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Program performance was assessed based on a goal to achieve a favourable perception rating of 85 percent. A 2014 Tracking Study revealed 89 percent of Canadians have a positive impression of CAF personnel, 83 percent say they view the military as a source of pride and 80 percent believe the CAF is essential.

Throughout FY 2014-15, Defence celebrated Canada’s military traditions and honoured the sacrifices of generations of Canadians by marking the centennial of the First World War, 75th anniversary of the Second World War, and by reflecting on the contributions made in Afghanistan (National Day of Honour).

Sub-Sub-Program 2.3.1: Military History, Heritage and Awareness

The Military History, Heritage and Awareness Program aims to increase awareness of the Canadian military history, heritage, roles, and contributions to Canada and Canadian identity. In addition, this Program serves to encourage interest in the Canadian military profession. Results are achieved through public information by preserving, interpreting, communicating, and showcasing Canada’s military history, traditions, roles, contributions, professionalism, expertise, and values in a wide variety of venues. The Military History, Heritage and Awareness Program services are provided directly to the Canadian public and military personnel.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

55,484,296 78,388,306 22,904,011
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 419 413 (6)
Civilian 72 89 17
TOTAL 491 502 11

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsActual Results
Canadians and the global community are provided with the opportunity to continue appreciating the achievements of the Canadian military Average audience size of direct outreach event 500 000 audience members (rolling 3 year average) 526,252
The Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) and Canada are well respected by the global community as a capable and competent military The number of international and national invitations received by the CAF for participation in Military Skills Competition 9 9
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Defence conducted initiatives to support Government efforts for commemoration of important anniversaries and meet the organizational priority Ensuring Sustainable Operational Excellence Both at Home and Abroad for the Defence of Canada and the Protection of Canadians.

Throughout FY 2014-15, Defence implemented Operation DISTINCTION - a series of commemorative events designed to honour Canada’s proud military history, from forging an identity during the War of 1812 to the military excellence achieved during the Wars of the 20th Century and the unprecedented changes that have occurred during contemporary global endeavours. Commemorative events began in 2012 and will continue until 2020 across Canada and in key international locations.

Highlights from FY 2014-15 include:

  • The 70th Anniversary of D-Day, 6 June 1944;
  • The 100th Anniversary of the Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry;
  • The 100th Anniversary of the Royal 22e Régiment;
  • On 25 July, CAF units tracing their heritage to militias formed during the War of 1812 participated in the commemoration of the Battle of Lundy’s Lane in the Niagara Region. On 6 November, a ceremony was held at Parliament Hill for the unveiling of the National 1812 Monument;
  • Amongst the many ceremonies executed to commemorate both the First and Second World Wars, the main effort was the expanded National Sentry Program launched at a ceremony on 4 August at the National War Memorial in Ottawa in conjunction with the commemoration of the start of the First World War. Under this program, sentries will stand guard at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier between 0900 hrs and 1700 hrs daily from 9 April to 10 November until 2020;
  • Prime Minister Stephen Harper designated 9 May 2014 as a National Day of Honour to commemorate Canada's mission in Afghanistan. Events in the National Capital Region served as the focal point for cross-Canada commemorative activities. Notable events to commemorate Canada’s mission in Afghanistan included:
    • From 4 to 9 May, the Soldier On Afghanistan Relay was held where 18 members from Soldier On carried the last flag from Afghanistan in a specially built baton through communities between Trenton and Ottawa. The relay culminated on 9 May during the commemoration parade for the National Day of Honour;
    • DND and the CAF participated in youth engagement efforts and national outreach by coordinating a Canadian Armed Forces speakers program. In total, 47 schools hosted a CAF Afghanistan veteran, directly reaching 8,400 young Canadians;
    • On 9 May, the Afghanistan Commemoration Parade took place on Parliament Hill and included a Guard of Honour featuring all elements of the CAF, other government departments and veterans from all deployment rotations in Afghanistan; and
    • Throughout 2014 and early 2015, the Afghanistan Memorial Vigil (AMV) was available for public viewing in cities across Canada as well as Washington, D.C. The AMV commemorates the fallen 158 CAF personnel, a Canadian diplomat, a DND contractor, a Canadian journalist, and 43 fallen United States Armed Forces members who served bravely under Canadian Command.
  • In 2014, the RCN marked the Battle of Coronel on 1 November. This battle saw the first Canadian military casualties of the First World War, and the first ever casualties in the history of the RCN; and
  • On Remembrance Day, the National War Memorial was rededicated to add the dates of the Afghanistan mission and the South African War.

Sub-Sub-Program 2.3.2: Youth Program

The Youth Program aims to enhance understanding of the Canadian Armed Forces and create an interest in the sea, land and air activities (both military and civilian) while preparing youth for their transition into adulthood through the development of attributes of leadership and community-minded citizenship, encouraging physical fitness, and promoting the traditional cultures and lifestyles reflective of the remote and isolated communities of Canada where some of the youth reside. The Youth Program is provided directly to Canadian youth and represents the largest federally-sponsored youth program in Canada. The Youth Program also has a direct impact on Canadian society as a whole, providing value in having well-rounded and experienced young citizens who are ready to assume their places as tomorrow's leaders and decision-makers. Cadet Instructors Cadre Officers, Military personnel and the Canadian Rangers are the main sources of instructors involved in providing training to the Youth Program.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

232,882,212 308,768,592 75,886,380
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 166 149 (17)
Civilian 152 111 (41)
TOTAL 318 260 (58)

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsActual Results
Populations of Canadian youth have the personal attributes to become responsible members of their communities as they transition into adulthood

Average duration of membership in the program

3 years 1.8 years
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

On average, Canadian youth spend close to two years in the Program. Defence is seeking to undertake a study to gain a better understanding of the types of activities and factors that will encourage youth to join and stay in the Program.

As part of implementing the Defence Renewal plan and to meet the organizational priority Ensuring Defence Affordabililty, efforts continued to focus on streamlining leadership and management to deliver relevant, effective and efficient Cadets 54 and Junior Canadian Rangers 55 programs

During FY 2014-15, renewal of the Cadet and Junior Canadian Rangers Programmes initiatives made steady progress including:

  • Restructuring to adopt a centralized command and control model;
  • Implementing a new governance model for the Cadet Program;
  • Initiating a Cadet Population Growth Strategy; and
  • Embarking on a program costing exercise so resources can be directed appropriately and resources pressures and opportunities can be addressed with agility.

As a result, there has already been reinvestment back into front-line Cadet programs such as field training uniforms and increased fitness resources.