Section II - Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome

STRATEGIC OUTCOME 2: DEFENCE REMAINS CONTINUALLY PREPARED TO DELIVER NATIONAL DEFENCE AND DEFENCE SERVICES IN ALIGNMENT WITH CANADIAN INTERESTS AND VALUES

There are three Programs associated with this Strategic Outcome:

  • Program 3.0: Defence Ready Force Element Production
  • Program 4.0: Defence Capability Element Production
  • Program 5.0: Defence Capability Development and Research

Program 3.0: Defence Ready Force Element Production

The Defence Ready Force Element Production Program produces and renews force elements on a continual basis for use in Defence Combat and Support Operations, as well as for the delivery of Defence Services and Contributions to Government, in order to increase the likelihood of success and decrease risk of failure in the defence of Canada and promotion of Canadian interests. Results are delivered by assembling force elements from the fundamental elements of Defence capability (i.e., military personnel, materiel and information systems, information, and, in some cases, real property), and integrating them through various training and certification programs so that they have the requisite amount of readiness in order to fulfill predefined roles within the operations for which they are destined. The term readiness refers to the volume, endurance, responsiveness and capability attributes of force elements that are not employed. These attributes are used to determine the degree of risk that would be associated with assigning them to fulfill perspective role(s) within on-going or contingency operations. The force elements produced by the Defence Ready Force Element Production Program are organized into portfolios according to the land, aerospace, and maritime environments in which they operate. There are also portfolios for force elements that operate jointly across these domains and force elements that provide common support functions. Across these portfolios, force elements are produced to meet readiness targets. These readiness targets ensure that production can be sustained over short- and medium-term time horizons and that the number of force elements available for employment in on-going and contingency operations is in accordance with acceptable levels of operational risk.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Main Estimates Planned SpendingTotal Authorities Available for Use Actual Spending(authorities used)

Difference
(actual minus planned)

3,039,436,884 3,039,436,885 3,281,611,558 3,284,882,232 245,445,347
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 26,917 25,627 (1,290)
Civilian 1,547 1,457 (90)
TOTAL 28,464 27,084 (1,380)
Note: Due to rounding, figures may not add up to total shown.

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsActual Results
There exists a sufficient and balanced portfolio of operationally ready force elements that can participate in Defence Operations and deliver Defence services % of time the roles required by force posture and readiness are filled appropriately 3/3 on a 3 point scale 3
% of all force elements that are employed or filling readiness roles 3/3 on a 3 point scale 3

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In support of the organizational priority Maintaining Required CAF Posture and Defence Readiness, Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces successfully assessed and monitored CAF force posture and defence readiness in regard to the domestic and international situation and met all planned and emergent readiness levels during FY 2014-15.

Defence Ready Force Element Production Program achievements and performance analysis are detailed under each of the applicable sub-sub-programs.

Sub-Program 3.1: Force Elements Readiness Sustainment

The Force Elements Readiness Sustainment Program aims to sustain the readiness state of force elements that have been assigned to roles that require them to be ready for operations. The force elements produced by the Canadian Armed Forces are organized into portfolios according to the land, aerospace, and maritime environments in which they operate. There are also portfolios for force elements that operate jointly across these domains and force elements that provide common support functions.  In each portfolio there are subsets of force elements that are in one of three states: assigned to roles that required them to be ready to respond to contingency operations; delivering Defence operations and services; or in a reduced state of readiness. This Program focuses on force elements in the first of these states. In some cases the existence of ready force elements can act as a deterrent against threats. Results are achieved through the provision of periodic training, exercises, validation activities, and related production services which ensure that force elements capabilities that have been assigned to roles in contingency operations do not degrade and that these force elements remain responsive to fulfill assigned roles when called upon. When contingency operations occur, and the force elements that reside within this Program are activated, their military capabilities are delivered via the Defence Combat and Support Operations Program or the Defence Services and Contributions to Government Program. Force elements participating in this Program may be returned to Force Elements Integration Training Program for short periods. They may also be moved to the Force Elements Production Program once they have exceeded the amount of time for which they have been assigned to a contingency role.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

737,917,354 891,429,399 153,512,045
Note: The difference is due in part to the variance explained under Sub-Sub-Program 3.1.3: Aerospace Roles – Readiness Sustainment.
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 9,080 8,695 (385)
Civilian 87 86 (1)
TOTAL 9,167 8,781 (386)
Note: Due to rounding, figures may not add up to total shown.

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsActual Results
Force Elements assigned readiness roles remain continuously ready to apply Defence capabilities during operations against threats or to deliver Defence services % of time the Defence force elements remain ready in accordance with force posture and readiness requirements 3/3 on a 3 point scale 3
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned
  • Activities within the Force Elements Readiness Sustainment Program are detailed under each of the applicable sub-sub-programs.

Sub-Sub-Program 3.1.1: Maritime Roles – Readiness Sustainment

The Maritime Roles Readiness Sustainment Program aims to sustain the readiness state of ships, submarines, and other force elements that operate in the maritime environment and have been assigned to roles requiring them to be ready for operations. The level of readiness attained by any force element in the maritime environment portfolio will decline over time. Those maritime units assigned roles such as “Ready Duty Ship” or “Composite Task Group” requiring a specific readiness state must take the appropriate action to maintain the necessary level of readiness. Results are provided through the conduct of periodic training, exercises, validation activities, and related production and maintenance activities which ensure that the capabilities attained by these force elements do not degrade and that they remain responsive to fulfill assigned roles when called upon. The products and services provided by this Program sustain Defence by directly enabling the delivery of maritime capabilities to the Defence Combat and Support Operations Program or the Defence Services and Contributions to Government Program. 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

250,796,854 255,133,007 4,336,154
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 2,883 2,798 (85)
Civilian 1 0 1
TOTAL 2,884 2,798 (86)

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsActual Results
Force elements assigned maritime roles remain continuously ready to apply Defence capabilities during operations against threats or to deliver Defence services % of time force posture and readiness roles are filled by ready maritime force elements 3/3 on a 3 point scale 3
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) implemented CDS direction for CAF force posture and defence readiness horizon 1 to address the organizational priority Maintaining Required CAF Posture and Defence Readiness. The RCN generated and sustained highly effective maritime force elements capable of synchronizing effects across the full spectrum of operations in accordance with the 10‐Year Fleet Plan. In light of the reduced fleet availability resulting from the ongoing Halifax-class Modernization (HCM) programme and the early retirement of four major warships, the RCN has seized every opportunity to the fullest extent to ensure continued delivery of excellence in operations at sea.

Sub-Sub-Program 3.1.2: Land Roles – Readiness Sustainment

The Land Roles Readiness Sustainment Program aims to sustain the achieved readiness level of land environment force elements that have been assigned to roles requiring them to be ready for operations.  The level of readiness attained by any force elements in the land environment portfolio will decline over time. Those land units assigned roles such as “Joint Task Force Western Domestic Support” or “Non-combatant Evacuation Operations Land Component” requiring a specific readiness state must take the appropriate action to maintain the necessary level of readiness. Results are achieved through the provision of continuation training and maintenance of vehicles and materiel to posture these forces on specific notice to move timing which ensures that the capabilities attained by these force elements do not degrade and that they remain responsive when called upon. When these force elements are activated, additional training may be required prior to being employed. The products and services provided by this Program sustain Defence by directly enabling the delivery of land capabilities to the Defence Combat and Support Operations Program or the Defence Services and Contributions to Government Program. 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

429,902,860 441,668,037 11,765,176

 

2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 5,556 5,034 (522)
Civilian 72 59 (13)
TOTAL 5,628 5,093 (535)

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsActual Results
Force elements assigned land roles remain continuously ready to apply Defence capabilities during operations against threats or to deliver Defence services % of time force posture and readiness roles are filled by ready land force elements 3/3 on a 3 point scale 3
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The Canadian Army (CA) implemented CDS direction for CAF force posture and defence readiness horizon 1 to address the organizational priority Maintaining Required CAF Posture and Defence Readiness. The CA generated and sustained responsive, adaptable and scalable land elements that are capable of synchronizing effects across the full spectrum of conflict. Resources were appropriately aligned to mitigate risk and to ensure that Commander of the Canadian Army was able to achieve all the Force Generation Tasks assigned through the CDS Force Posture and Readiness Directive. During FY 2014-15, the CA maintained readiness posture and deployed force elements in Canada (i.e. Operation LENTUS, Operation NANOOK) and overseas (i.e. Operation REASSURANCE).

Sub-Sub-Program 3.1.3: Aerospace Roles – Readiness Sustainment

The Aerospace Roles Readiness Sustainment Program aims to sustain the readiness state of fighters, helicopters and other force elements that operate in the aerospace environment and have been assigned to roles requiring them to be ready for operations. The level of readiness attained by any force elements in the aerospace environment portfolio will decline over time. Those aerospace units assigned roles such as “Air space control” or “Strategic Airlift” requiring a specific readiness state must take the appropriate action to maintain the necessary level of readiness. Results are provided by this Program through the conduct of periodic training, exercises, validation activities, and related production and maintenance activities which ensure that the capabilities attained by these force elements do not degrade and that they remain responsive to fulfill assigned roles when called upon. The products and services provided by this Program sustain Defence by directly enabling the delivery of aerospace capabilities to the Defence Combat and Support Operations Program or the Defence Services and Contributions to Government Program. 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

42,704,569 180,701,502 137,996,933
Note: The difference is primarily due to the underestimation of planned spending in this Program. The difference is also due to an increase in aerospace readiness activities. This increase is offset by a reduction in aerospace operational activities under Sub-Sub-Program 1.1.2: Ongoing Defence, Security and Sovereignty of Canada Operations.

 

2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 553 737 184
Civilian 0 27 27
TOTAL 553 764 211

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsActual Results
Force elements assigned aerospace roles remain continuously ready to apply Defence capabilities during operations against threats or to deliver Defence services % of time aerospace force elements remain ready 3/3 on a 3 point scale 3
 Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) implemented CDS direction for CAF force posture and defence readiness horizon 1 to address the organizational priority Maintaining Required CAF Posture and Defence Readiness. The RCAF continued to re-balance its force posture and readiness (FP&R) to efficiently meet the CDS FP&R mandate and the CDS intent within the scope of available resources. The RCAF continued to effectively operate around the world in support of operations such as Operation IMPACT and Operation NANOOK.

Sub-Sub-Program 3.1.4: Special Operations Roles – Readiness Sustainment

The Special Operations Roles Readiness Sustainment Program aims to sustain the assigned readiness state of force elements that conduct special operations and have been assigned to roles that require them to be ready for operations on specific notice to move. Those special operations forces assigned roles such as “Immediate Response Task Force” or “Task Force Arrowhead” requiring a specific readiness state must take the appropriate action to maintain the necessary level of readiness. Results are achieved by this Program through a cyclical process that includes the provision of periodic training, exercises, provisioning, equipment maintenance and inspections which ensure that the capabilities attained by these force elements do not degrade and that they remain responsive to fulfill assigned roles when called upon. The products and services provided by this Program sustain Defence by directly enabling the Defence Combat and Support Operations Program or the Defence Services and Contributions to Government Program. 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

 -
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force - - -
Civilian - - -
TOTAL - - -
Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsActual Results
Force elements assigned special operations force roles remain continuously ready to apply Defence capabilities during operations against threats or to deliver Defence services % of time force posture and readiness roles are filled by ready special operations force elements 3/3 on a 3 point scale 3
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Special Operations and its effects are achieved across the Defence Program Alignment Architecture.  Details regarding how Special Operations achieves and performs its assigned tasks are classified.

Readiness and force generation results are achieved through sub-sub-programs 3.1.4 Special Operations Roles – Readiness Sustainment and 3.3.4 Special Operations – Force Element Production. Generally this is accomplished through a process that includes the provision of training, exercises, provisioning, equipment maintenance and inspections which ensure that the capabilities attained by these force elements do not degrade and that they remain responsive to fulfill assigned roles when called upon. Sub-sub-programs 3.1.4 Special Operations Roles – Readiness Sustainment and 3.3.4 Special Operations – Force Element Production are the areas whereby Special Operations sustainment activities are captured.

For additional information, please see the Defence Special Operations Forces 56 web page.

Sub-Sub-Program 3.1.5: Joint and Common Operations Roles – Readiness Sustainment

The Joint and Common Roles Readiness Sustainment Program aims to sustain the readiness state of joint and common force elements that have been assigned to roles requiring them to be ready for operations. Those joint and common forces elements assigned roles such as “Air Field Medical Station” or “Operational Liaison and Recce Team” (OLRT) requiring a specific readiness state must take the appropriate action to maintain the necessary level of readiness. Results are provided through the conduct of periodic training, exercises, and maintenance activities which ensure that the capabilities attained by these force elements do not degrade and that they remain responsive to fulfill assigned roles when called upon. The products and services provided by this Program sustain Defence by directly enabling the Defence Combat and Support Operations Program or the Defence Services and Contributions to Government Program. 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

14,513,071 13,926,853 (586,218)
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

 Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 137 126 (11)
Civilian 14 1 (13)
TOTAL 151 127 (24)

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsActual Results
Force elements assigned joint and common roles remain continuously ready to apply Defence capabilities during operations against threats or to deliver Defence services % of time force posture and readiness roles are filled by ready joint and common force elements 3/3 on a 3 point scale 3
 Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

To contribute to meeting the organizational priority Maintaining Required CAF Posture and Defence Readiness, Defence continued to assess and monitor CAF force posture and defence readiness in regard to the domestic and international situation. Specific to this Program, Defence worked to enhance capabilities within the key joint enablers of Joint Command and Control, Joint Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance, and Operational Support.

FY 2014-15 highlights include:

  • Continued the development of the capability to form a deployable Multinational Joint Integrated Task Force headquarters, built on the framework of 1 Canadian Division headquarters, linked to Contingency Plan JUPITER - the contingency plan for sustained expeditionary operations that guides operational level force employment up to and including full spectrum operations.
  • Furthered the development and refinement of force generation/force employment models for a deployable Joint Task Force Headquarters and a Joint Task Force Support Component.

Sub-Program 3.2: Force Elements Integration Training

The Force Elements Integration Training Program produces force elements with enhanced levels of interoperability with other force elements so that they can operate together, to achieve the collective objectives of a larger formation. The force elements received by this Program are organized into portfolios according to the land, aerospace and maritime environments in which they operate. There are also portfolios for force elements that operate jointly across these domains and force elements that provide common support functions. Results are achieved through the execution of training events in which force elements within the same portfolio exercise together for the explicit purpose of enhancing interoperability. Results are also achieved through training events where the explicit focus is interoperability between force elements in different portfolios. These are considered joint training events.  International (combined) training events focus on the interoperability of force elements produced in Canada with those of allied nations. After partaking in this Program, force elements typically attain new or improved abilities to deliver a broader range of military effects during a defence operation and therefore this Program enables them to enhance their state of readiness. If the level of readiness attained through this Program is sufficient, then individual force elements may be assigned to fulfill a contingency role or they may be employed to deliver Defence operations or Defence services already in progress. They may also be delivered back to the Defence Ready Force Element Production Program. 

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

406,835,719 469,427,526 62,591,807
Note: The difference is due in part to the variance explained under Sub-Sub-Program 3.2.6: International and Domestic – Interoperability Training.
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 3,990 3,744 (246)
Civilian 129 33 (96)
TOTAL 4,119 3,777 (342)
Note: Due to rounding, figures may not add up to total shown.

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsActual Results
Force elements have the ability to work in coordination with one another to achieve greater synergy and realize the enhanced capabilities of a larger collective formation during operations against threats or to deliver Defence services % of force elements that have completed integration training to meet force posture and readiness requirements 3/3 on a 3 point scale 3
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Defence successfully completed integration training to meet force posture and readiness requirements.

Key joint training activities included Command and Control of Expeditionary Forces (Rim of the Pacific Exercise 57 (RIMPAC)), Command and Control of Domestic Forces within a Continental Framework (Exercise DETERMINED DRAGON 58), and sovereignty in the north (OP NANOOK). For details, see Sub-Sub-Program 3.2.6 International and Domestic – Interoperability Training.

  • The CAF continued to work through exercises to ensure optimal response in Search and Rescue situations, including challenging environments such as the North. For details, see Sub-Sub-Program 3.2.5 Joint – Integration Training.

For more information, see the Canadian Armed Forces National Exercises 59 webpage.

Sub-Sub-Program 3.2.1: Maritime Environment – Integration Training

The Maritime Environment Integration Training Program aims to increase the level of interoperability between force elements in the maritime portfolio so that they can operate together to achieve the collective objectives of a larger formation at reduced risk and with better chances for success. Results are achieved through the execution of training events like “TGEX”. Naval task groups are common outputs of this Program; however, not every training event will produce a larger force element like a task group. This Program facilitates increases in readiness to deal with the complexities of modern warfare. After partaking in this Program, force elements in the maritime portfolio attain new or improved abilities to deliver a broader range of military effects during defence operations. This Program sustains Defence by enabling the Maritime Roles Readiness Sustainment Program but also by enabling the employment of maritime force elements within ongoing Defence operations or to deliver Defence services.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

19,178,047 6,076,533 (13,101,513)
Note: As noted in Sub-Sub-Program 3.4.1: Maritime Environment – Force Element Production, Coordination and Command, the difference is partially due to the decentralization and delegation of several responsibilities.
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 58 54 (4)
Civilian 2 0 (2)
TOTAL 60 54 (6)

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsActual Results
A subset of maritime force elements have the ability to work in coordination with one another to achieve greater synergy and realize the enhanced capabilities of a larger collective formation % of maritime force elements that have completed integration training to meet force posture and readiness requirements 3/3 on a 3 point scale 3
 Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The RCN participated in three Task Group Exercises over the course of the year, two on the east coast and one on the west coast. The west coast also participated in RIMPAC. For details, see Sub-Sub-Program 3.2.6 International and Domestic – Interoperability Training.

Sub-Sub-Program 3.2.2: Land Environment – Integration Training

The Land Environment Integration Training Program aims to increase the level of integration between land force elements appointed in the Army Managed Readiness Plan to achieve their assigned readiness level. Results are achieved through the execution of training events such as Exercise “MAPLE RESOLVE” and validation activities. This Program facilitates increases in readiness to deal with the complexities of modern warfare. After partaking in this Program, force elements in the land portfolio are capable of delivering a broader range of military effects during operations. This Program sustains Defence by enabling the Land Roles Readiness Sustainment Program but also by enabling the employment of land force elements within ongoing Defence operations or to deliver Defence services.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

312,577,659 317,622,882 5,045,223
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 3,699 3,310 (389)
Civilian 119 23 (96)
TOTAL 3,818 3,333 (485)

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsActual Results
A subset of land force elements have the ability to work in coordination with one another to achieve greater synergy and realize the enhanced capabilities of a larger collective formation % of land force elements that have completed integration training to meet force posture and readiness requirements 3/3 on a 3 point scale 3
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The Canadian Army’s (CA) Managed Readiness Plan (MRP) meets the roles and missions assigned in the Canada First Defence Strategy by leveraging the full capacity of the Army’s doctrine and training system, and force generation base.  Current fiscal and resource realities require a tiered-readiness approach to how the Army meets the nation’s requirements for affordable, deployable and sustainable ready forces. During FY 2014-15, the flexibility built into the MRP has demonstrated its agility and has allowed the CA to respond to changing operational priorities, while ensuring the CA maintains the necessary ready forces to execute operations.

Additionally, the CA continued to leverage training opportunities, including those in specific environments to promote agility, improve joint integration, encourage retention, and institutionalize capabilities which are necessary for the current and future global security environment.

Sub-Sub-Program 3.2.3: Aerospace Environment – Integration Training

The Aerospace Environment Integration Training Program aims to increase the level of interoperability between force elements in the aerospace portfolio so they can operate together to achieve the collective objectives of a larger formation with reduced risks and better chances for success. Results are achieved through the execution of named training events such as Exercise “MAPLE FLAG”. Air Expeditionary Task Forces are common outputs of this Program however not every named training event will produce a larger force element like a task force. This Program facilitates increases in readiness to deal with the complexities of modern warfare. After partaking in this Program, force elements in the aerospace portfolio attain new or improved abilities to deliver a broader range of military effects during defence operations. This Program sustains Defence by enabling the Aerospace Roles Readiness Sustainment Program but also by enabling the employment of aerospace force elements within ongoing Defence operations or to deliver Defence services.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

34,106,066 55,094,041 20,987,975
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 116 169 53
Civilian 4 4 0
TOTAL 120 173 53

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsActual Results
A subset of aerospace force elements have the ability to work in coordination with one another to achieve greater synergy and realize the enhanced capabilities of a larger collective formation % of the aerospace force elements that have completed the required integration training 3/3 on a 3 point scale 3
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Several key training activities and exercises took place, at various levels in order to support the training requirements of the RCAF. Financial restraint was duly applied, at all levels, in order for the costs and expenses to remain within the assigned resource envelopes, in accordance with policies in effect and Defence priorities.

Sub-Sub-Program 3.2.4: Special Operations – Integration Training

The Special Operations Integration Training Program aims to increase the level of integration between special operations force elements to achieve their assigned roles and readiness levels. Results are achieved through the execution of collective training events like “DEVIL’S ARROW” and activities focussed on interoperability and capacity building. These activities for Special Operations force elements establish relationships that further synchronize efforts across the military spectrum and multiple agencies, reducing risks and increasing chances of success. This Program sustains Defence by enabling the Special Operations Roles Readiness Sustainment Program but also by enabling the employment of special operations force elements within ongoing Defence operations or to deliver Defence services.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

 -
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force
Civilian -
TOTAL

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsActual Results
A subset of special operations force elements have the ability to work in coordination with one another to achieve greater synergy and realize the enhanced capabilities of a larger collective formation % of special operations force elements that have completed integration training to meet force posture and readiness requirements 3/3 on a 3 point scale 3
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Special Operations and its effects are achieved across Defence’s Program Alignment Architecture. The details regarding how Special Operations achieves and performs assigned tasks are classified.

Sub-Sub-Program 3.2.5: Joint – Integration Training

The Joint Integration Training Program aims to increase the level of integration between joint force elements across different environment portfolios so that collective objectives of a larger joint formation can be achieved. Results are achieved through the execution of training events like “JOINTEX” that increase joint readiness to deal with the complexities of modern warfare. After partaking in this Program, force elements attain abilities to deliver a broader range of military effects. This Program sustains Defence by enabling the Joint and Common Readiness Sustainment Program but also by enabling the employment of joint force elements within ongoing Defence operations or to deliver Defence services.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

24,916,607 24,966,530 49,923
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

 Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 83 84 1
Civilian 0 0 0
TOTAL 83 84 1

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsActual Results
A subset of joint force elements have the ability to work in coordination with one another to achieve greater synergy and realize the enhanced capabilities of a larger collective formation % of joint force elements that have completed integration training to meet force posture and readiness requirements 3/3 on a 3 point scale 3
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

To ensure optimal response in Search and Rescue situations, including challenging environments such as the North, the CAF conducted the following two exercises during the fiscal year:

  • The National Search and Rescue Exercise (SAREX) took place from 15 to 20 September at 5 Wing Goose Bay, Newfoundland and Labrador. It included 250 participants from the CAF, the Civil Air Search and Rescue Association, the Canadian Coast Guard and the Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary. During SAREX 2014, the participants were challenged with land, air, and water-based SAR scenarios. These scenarios were designed to test a variety of skills, including search techniques, parachute accuracy, mountaineering, water rescue, and emergency medical response.
  • From 20 to 23 August, maritime and air forces conducted a SAR exercise (SAREX) as part of Operation NANOOK in response to a distress signal from a fishing vessel in the Davis Strait. The second scenario, from 26 to 29 August featured a joint response to a small cruise ship that had grounded near the southern tip of Baffin Island after mechanical difficulties. The CAF deployed a major air disaster kit and worked with other government departments to respond to the simulated crises. Operation NANOOK demonstrated the CAF’s ability to exercise sovereignty in the North.

Exercise DETERMINED DRAGON, Operation NANOOK and Exercise Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC), captured under Sub-Sub-Program 3.2.6: International and Domestic – Interoperability Training also pertain to this Sub-Sub-Program as these events meet both integration and interoperability training requirements.

Sub-Sub-Program 3.2.6: International and Domestic – Interoperability Training

The International and Domestic Interoperability Training Program aims to increase the level of interoperability between force elements from multiple nations or domestic organizations so that the collective objectives of these cooperative ventures can be achieved. Results are achieved through the execution of international or domestic training events. Recent examples include exercises “RIMPAC, JOINT WARRIOR and TRIDENT FURY”. After partaking in this Program force elements attain abilities to deliver a broader range of military effects during defence operations. This Program sustains Defence by enabling the Force Element Readiness Sustainment Program but also by enabling the employment of force elements within ongoing Defence operations or to deliver Defence services.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

16,057,341 65,667,540 49,610,200
Note: The difference is due in part to expenditures for Operation REASSURANCE exercises.
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 35 127 92
Civilian 5 5 0
TOTAL 40 132 92

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsActual Results
A sufficient subset of force elements have the enhanced ability to operate as part of a multi-national force during operations that militate against threats or deliver Defence services % of the force elements that have completed the required interoperability training 3/3 on a 3 point scale 3
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Defence participated in scheduled exercises and training activities to enhance the ability to operate as part of a multi-national force during operations, to mitigate threats, or deliver defence services.

FY 2014-15 highlights include :

  • Exercise Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) the largest biennial naval exercise in the world and saw more than 1,000 Canadian sailors, soldiers, airmen, and airwomen participating from 26 June to 1 August in the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California area. Canadian Armed Forces members also fulfilled key leadership roles as Commander Coalition Maritime Force Component, Deputy Coalition Force Air Component Commander and Commander Coalition Task Group 172.2 (Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance). The 22 RIMPAC participating countries trained in a joint environment, which underlined the importance of building ongoing partnerships with allies and partners. The first fully integrated Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief scenario and Canadian led medical symposium to exchange lessons learned from recent operations and innovative medical practices further enhanced this joint training exercise.
  • Exercise DETERMINED DRAGON is an annual training event aimed at exercising the ability to execute various scenarios in defence of North America and global defence operations. This year’s exercise primarily focused on the lateral interface between NORAD, United States Northern Command and United States Strategic Command specifically in cyber and space domains. It was executed from 20 to 29 October.
  • Operation NANOOK, the largest sovereignty operation in Canada's North, promoted interoperability with Other Government Departments, international partners, and local authorities to increase northern safety and security. Conducted from 20 to 29 August in York Sound and the Davis Strait, Nunavut, it involved more than 800 participants, including all branches of the CAF, a Royal Danish Navy ship, a United States Navy surveillance aircraft, as well as numerous federal, territorial and regional governments. 

As part of the Operation REASSURANCE mandate, the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) undertook military activities to support NATO assurance measures through the provision of military capabilities for training, exercises, demonstrations and assigned NATO tasks.

FY 2014-15 highlights include:

  • In fall 2014 HMCS Toronto joined NATO’s Standing Naval Maritime Group (SNMG) 2 to monitor shipping to help deter, defend, disrupt and protect against terrorist activity in the Mediterranean. SNMG 2 units also provided support to Operation ACTIVE ENDAVOUR which conducted similar activities with a narrower focus on the waters around Gibraltar and North Africa.
  • Exercise SABER STRIKE is an annual exercise in the Baltic Region led by U.S. Army Europe to strengthen regional stability, military partnerships and interoperability. This year, approximately 2,000 personnel from 10 countries took part in the training exercises. Approximately 120 soldiers from 3rd Battalion, Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry participated in Exercise SABER STRIKE in Latvia from 9 to 20 June. The exercises fostered defence and leadership capabilities among the Baltic States and challenged participants with detailed tactical planning and coordination.
  • Approximately 100 CAF soldiers participated in Exercise STEADFAST JAVELLIN II, a multinational exercise, from 2 to 8 September, in Latvia. The exercise aimed to develop and enhance interoperability, readiness, joint operations capabilities, and multinational responses to potential crises. The exercise took place in five countries: Germany, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, and Poland.
  • Exercise SEA BREEZE took place from 8 to 10 September and involved naval vessels from eight nations: Bulgaria, Canada, Georgia, Romania, Spain, Turkey, Ukraine and the United States. A second exercise involved Bulgarian and Romanian ships and took place from 13 to 18 September. A third exercise that involved HMCS Toronto and Spanish and Turkish allies, occurred from 22 to 24 September.
  • Canadian soldiers from Oscar Company, 3rd Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment took part in Exercise ANAKONDA-14, a Polish Armed Forces joint exercise. It involved almost 12,500 personnel, including 750 soldiers from NATO allied countries and was conducted throughout Poland’s training areas from 24 September to 3 October.
  • Approximately 45 soldiers from the Canadian Army took part in Exercise ALLIED SPIRIT, a US-led multinational exercise that took place in Germany from 12 to 31 January.
  • HMCS Toronto participated between 13 and 26 October in the Mediterranean Sea and Eastern Atlantic Ocean in Exercise NOBLE JUSTIFICATION. The exercise strengthened military-to-military and diplomatic relationships among the participating 16 NATO nations.

In addition to Operation REASSURANCE, Defence deployed designated maritime, land and aerospace force elements to increase the level of interoperability between NATO, Partnership for Peace and other designated nations.

Further highlights for FY 2014-15 include:

  • Operation OPEN SPIRIT is an annual multinational explosive remnant of war operation conducted through the Partnership for Peace program. It took place in Latvia between 9 and 22 May led by the Latvian Naval Flotilla and based out of the Latvian Naval Base. The goal of Operation OPEN SPIRIT 2014 was to reduce the threat of unexploded ordnance throughout the Baltic region, conduct operations with our security and defence partners and strengthen ties with our Eastern European allies. It also helped the Royal Canadian Navy clearance divers develop and validate advanced conventional munitions disposal capabilities under conditions not easily replicated in Canada.
  • Exercise TRADEWINDS is an annual exercise led by the United States Southern Command to increase Caribbean nations’ capacity to counter transnational crime and provide humanitarian assistance and disaster relief. From 1 to 25 June, CAF land and maritime assets participated with Caribbean partners in the Caribbean Basin.
  • HMCS Toronto participated in Exercise NOBLE MARINER between 13 and 26 October in the Mediterranean Sea and Eastern Atlantic Ocean. This exercise strengthened military-to-military and diplomatic relationships among the participating 16 NATO nations.
  • The flying portion of NORAD’s Exercise VIGILANT SHIELD 15 took place at 5 Wing Goose Bay, Newfoundland and Labrador, from 20 to 26 October. The exercise provided approximately 550 personnel from the Canadian Armed Forces, the United States Air Force and the United States Air National Guard with the opportunity to realistically train and practice aerospace defence missions in a simulated training environment.

Sub-Program 3.3: Force Elements Production

The Force Elements Production Program aims to produce individual force elements with the ability to operate effectively as a cohesive unit, as per their design specification. The force elements produced by the Canadian Armed Forces are organized into portfolios according to the land, aerospace and maritime environments in which they operate. There are also portfolios for force elements that operate jointly across these environments and force elements that provide common support functions. This Program delivers results by assembling force elements from the fundamental elements of Defence capability (i.e., military personnel, materiel and information systems, information, and, in some cases, real property) and integrating them through various training and certification programs. Within this Program individual force elements attain a certain degree of readiness. If a sufficient level of readiness is attained, then individual force elements may be assigned to fulfill a contingency role or they may be directly employed to deliver Defence operations or Defence services that are already in progress. However, this Program does not necessarily provide individual force elements with the ability to operate effectively as part of a larger integrated formation. If the force elements produced by this Program require advanced levels of interoperability, then they may be assigned to take part in the Force Element Integration Training Program.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

 Difference
(actual minus planned)

1,445,556,152 1,357,538,844 (88,017,308)
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 10,855 10,492 (363)
Civilian 556 457 (99)
TOTAL 11,411 10,949 (462)
Note: Due to rounding, figures may not add up to total shown.

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsActual Results
A balanced portfolio of force elements that are continually produced to apply specific Defence capabilities as independent entities, to fulfill readiness roles, and to be employed against threats in Defence operations or to deliver Defence services % of weighted force elements from all portfolios that have completed the required readiness production milestones 3/3 on a 3 point scale 3
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Activities within the Force Elements Production Program are detailed under each of the applicable sub-sub-programs.

Sub-Sub-Program 3.3.1: Maritime Environment – Force Element Production

The Maritime Environment Force Element Production Program seeks to produce individual force elements within the maritime portfolio with the ability to operate as a cohesive unit but not necessarily as part of a larger integrated force.  Results are delivered through a tiered readiness process where force elements are assembled from the fundamental elements of Defence capability (i.e., military personnel, materiel and information systems, information, and, in some cases, real property) and then readied through various training, certification and close-support maintenance/production programs. Within this Program individual maritime force elements acquire a range of abilities to deliver military effects in operational contexts according to understood concepts and standards. The products provided by this Program sustain Defence by directly enabling the Maritime Roles Readiness Sustainment Program, the Maritime Environment Integration Training Program and the International and Domestic – Interoperability Training Program. Based on the readiness targets set for assignment to contingency roles or employment in Defence operations, force elements may be transferred directly from this Program. However when higher levels of interoperability are required, force elements are first transferred to the Maritime Environment Integration Training Program.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

 Difference
(actual minus planned)

141,854,621 67,530,090 (74,324,531)
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 538 308 (230)
Civilian 23 4 (19)
TOTAL 561 312 (249)

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsActual Results
A portfolio of individual maritime force elements are continually produced to be employed, in delivering Defence operations and Defence services % of maritime force elements that have met the required readiness production milestones 3/3 on a 3 point scale 3
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Twenty-seven readiness production events, such as work-ups, operations team training, or air work-ups, were conducted by 19 units in accordance with the fleet schedule. All units successfully completed their requirements on schedule.

Sub-Sub-Program 3.3.2: Land Environment – Force Element Production

The Land Environment Force Element Production Program seeks to produce individual force elements within the land portfolio with the ability to operate as a cohesive unit capable of delivering unique capabilities that can be built upon and integrated into a larger task tailored force.  Results are delivered through structured processes using the fundamental elements of Defence capability (i.e., military personnel, materiel and information systems, information, and, in some cases, real property).  Within this Program force elements in the land portfolio acquire abilities to deliver baseline military effects within operational contexts according to baseline training standards. The products provided by this Program sustain Defence by directly enabling the Land Roles Readiness Sustainment Program, the Land Environment Integration Training Program and the International and Domestic Interoperability Training Program. In some cases these forces achieve sufficient training objectives to be assigned directly to Defence operations. But, in most cases, these force elements proceed to the Land Environment - Integration Training Program and when necessary to the International and Domestic Interoperability Training Program.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

830,028,968 818,164,924 (11,864,044)
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 6,969 6,637 (332)
Civilian 349 247 (102)
TOTAL 7,318 6,884 (434)

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsActual Results
A portfolio of individual land force elements are continually produced to be employed, in delivering Defence operations and Defence services % of land force elements that have met the required readiness production milestones 3/3 on a 3 point scale 3
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

All FY 2014-15 planned Foundation Training events in support of the Managed Readiness Plan (MRP) occurred, allowing the Canadian Army (CA) to develop and practice soldiers and leaders within a realistic contemporary operating environment, both domestic and expeditionary in nature. This training marked the first year of the new 36 month MRP. This model allows the Lead Mounting Division an entire year to conduct Road To High Readiness Training, vice eight months as per the previous model. The successful conduct of individual and collective foundation training laid the solid foundation of combat capabilities that proved crucial for the success of subsequent combined arms live fire training (Commander Canadian Army’s vital ground) and beyond.

As part of the CA’s Arctic Concept 2021, the CA force generated, primarily from the Army Primary Reserve, Arctic Response Company Groups (ARCG) that were trained and equipped to operate in all arctic conditions. The ARCG’s state of readiness for winter and summer operations is synchronized within the MRP and prioritized based on known and forecasted operational requirements.

Sub-Sub-Program 3.3.3: Aerospace Environment – Force Element Production

The Aerospace Environment Force Element Production Program seeks to produce individual force elements within the aerospace portfolio with the ability to operate as a cohesive unit but not necessarily as part of a larger integrated force. Results are delivered through structured managed readiness processes where force elements are assembled from the fundamental elements of Defence capability (i.e., military personnel, materiel and information systems, information, and, in some cases, real property) and then readied through various foundation training, certification and close-support maintenance/production programs. Within this Program aerospace force elements acquire abilities to deliver a range of military effects according to understood concepts and standards. The products provided by this Program sustain Defence by directly enabling the Aerospace Roles Readiness Sustainment Program, the Aerospace Environment Integration Training Program and the International and Domestic Interoperability Training Program. In many cases, the readiness targets set for assignment to contingency roles or employment within Defence operations are consistent with the degree of readiness obtained by aerospace force elements through this Program. In other cases, force elements must transition to the Aerospace Environment Integration Training Program before attaining the requisite level of readiness.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

117,130,716 108,574,119 (8,556,598)
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 726 975 249
Civilian 8 39 31
TOTAL 734 1,014 280

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsActual Results
A portfolio of individual aerospace force elements are continually produced to be employed, in delivering Defence operations and Defence services % of aerospace force elements that have met the required readiness production milestones 3/3 on a 3 point scale 3
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The RCAF was able to produce adequate aircrew through its operational training units to support required readiness levels. The RCAF also was able to maintain a high level of aircraft serviceability despite on-going issues with aging fleets and availability of qualified technicians.

Sub-Sub-Program 3.3.4: Special Operations – Force Element Production

The Special Operations Force Element Production Program seeks to produce individual force elements within the special operations portfolio with the ability to operate as a cohesive organization that is task tailored Special Operations Task Forces or Teams not necessarily part of a larger integrated force.  Results are delivered through structured processes where Special Operations force elements are assembled from the fundamental elements of Defence capability (i.e., Special Operations personnel, materiel and information systems, information, and, in some cases, real property). The products provided by this Program sustain Defence by directly enabling the Special Operations Roles Readiness Sustainment Program, the Special Operations Integration Training Program and the International and Domestic Interoperability Training Program. Assigned readiness supports the roles for employment within Defence operations and is consistent with the degree of readiness obtained by force elements through this Program.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

267,754,108 295,271,320 27,517,212
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 1,580 1,745 165
Civilian 113 106 (7)
TOTAL 1,693 1,851 158

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsActual Results
A portfolio of individual special operations force elements are continually produced to be employed, in delivering Defence operations and Defence services % of special operations force elements that have met the required readiness production milestones 3/3 on a 3 point scale 3
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Special Operations and its effects are achieved across the Defence Program Alignment Architecture.  Specific details of how Special Operations achieves and performs assigned tasks are classified.

Readiness and force generation results are achieved through sub-sub-programs 3.1.4 Special Operations Roles – Readiness Sustainment and 3.3.4 Special Operations – Force Element Production. Generally, this is accomplished through a process that includes the provision of training, exercises, provisioning, equipment maintenance and inspections which ensure that the capabilities attained by these force elements do not degrade and that they remain responsive to fulfill assigned roles when called upon. Sub-sub-programs 3.1.4 Special Operations Roles – Readiness Sustainment and 3.3.4 Special Operations – Force Element Production are the areas whereby Special Operations sustainment activities are captured.

For additional information, please see the Defence Special Operations Forces 60 web-page.

Sub-Sub-Program 3.3.5: Joint and Common – Force Element Production

The Joint and Common Force Element Production Program seeks to produce portfolios of individual force elements that operate across the environmental domains and have attained the ability to operate as a cohesive unit capable of delivering unique capabilities that can be built upon and integrated into a larger task tailored force. Results are delivered through structured readiness production processes where force elements are assembled from the fundamental elements of Defence capability (i.e., military personnel, materiel and information systems, information, and, in some cases, real property). Within this Program, force elements acquire abilities to deliver a range of military effects according to understood concepts and standards. The products provided by this Program sustain Defence by directly enabling the Joint and Common Roles Readiness Sustainment Program, the Joint Integration Training Program and the International and Domestic Interoperability Training Program. In some cases, the readiness targets set for assignment to employment within Defence operations are consistent with the degree of readiness obtained by force elements through this Program. In other cases, force elements must transition to the Joint Integration Training Program before attaining the requisite level of readiness.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

88,787,739 67,998,392 (20,789,347)
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 1,042 827 (215)
Civilian 64 60 (4)
TOTAL 1,106 887 (219)

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsActual Results
A portfolio of individual joint and common force elements are continually produced to be employed, in delivering Defence operations and Defence services % of joint and common force elements that have met the required readiness production milestones 3/3 on a 3 point scale 3
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

All activities conducted under the Joint and Common Force Element Production Program are captured within the Program’s description.

Sub-Program 3.4: Operational Readiness Production, Coordination and Command and Control

The Operational Readiness Production, Coordination and Command and Control Program aims to deliver the command and control structures that support the readiness and balance of Maritime, Land, Aerospace, Special Operations, and Joint and Common force elements. This is accomplished through the development of plans, distribution of resources, coordination of activities, and exercise of overarching control. This supports the programs that provide individual force elements and integrated forces that are ready to be employed in Defence operations or deliver Defence services.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

449,127,659 566,486,463 117,358,804
Note: The difference is due in part to the variance explained under Sub-Sub-Program 3.4.1: Maritime Environment – Force Element Production, Coordination and Command and Control.
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 2,992 2,696 (296)
Civilian 775 882 107
TOTAL 3,767 3,578 (189)
Note: Due to rounding, figures may not add up to total shown.

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
The risks that may impede the optimal production of ready force elements in the near and mid-term are reduced % of sub-sub-programs under Sub-Program 3.4 that achieve a minimum of 90% of their expected result 70 -100%  40%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Activities within the Operational Readiness Production Coordination and Command and Control Program are detailed under each of the applicable sub-sub-programs.

Sub-Sub-Program 3.4.1: Maritime Environment – Force Element Production, Coordination and Command and Control

The Maritime Environment Force Element Production, Coordination and Command and Control Program aims to ensure that maritime force elements are ready to be employed in Defence operations or deliver Defence services. Results are accomplished by developing and maintaining Maritime command and control structures that deliver governance, directives, policies and procedures, coordination, resource planning and management, exercise overarching control, and advice and direction for and in the maritime environment. This Program sustains Defence by directly enabling the Maritime Environment Force Element Production Program, Integration Training Program, and the Maritime Roles Readiness Sustainment Program, as well as the International and Domestic Interoperability Training Program. Advice and information are also provided to Land Environment, Aerospace Environment, Special Operations Forces, and Joint and Common Force Element Production Coordination and Control Programs as required in order to ensure readiness coordination across all force elements.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

54,555,671 96,538,069 41,982,397
Note: The difference is due in part to the underestimation of planned spending as well as  command and control activities that were previously allocated to sub-sub-programs 3.1.1: Maritime Roles – Readiness Sustainment and 3.2.1: Maritime Integration Training were allocated to this Sub-Sub-Program.
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 395 401 6
Civilian 185 142 (43)
TOTAL 580 543 (37)

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
A portfolio of Maritime Force Elements is generated and sustained so as to be continuously available for employment in Defence operations or to deliver Defence services % score of the Maritime Environment - Force Element Production Coordination and Command and Control Performance Evaluation Index 90 - 100% 75%
% of maritime force elements that are employed or filling readiness roles 40 - 55% 52%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) continued to focus its command and control structure through the de-centralization of responsibilities for operational force generation activities to Commander of Maritime Forces Pacific and by the de-centralization of responsibilities for operational force employment activities to Commander of Maritime Forces Atlantic. Individual training and education and personnel management elements of Force Generation were delegated to Commander of Maritime Forces Pacific. The collective/operation training elements of Force Generation as well as operational elements of planning, fleet readiness, warfare policy, and responsibility for the CAF Expeditionary Maritime Component Commander were delegated to Commander of Maritime Forces Atlantic. In the fall 2014, the RCN stood up the Maritime Readiness Costing Working Group with the aim of conducting a complete review of maritime readiness program including: RCN Readiness and Sustainment Policy and Model; RCN Readiness Costing Model; Readiness Management System; and National Procurement Readiness Mapping.

Pending the arrival of the Queenston-class supply ships, the RCN commenced negotiating arrangements with the Chilean and the Spanish Navies to provide RCN sailors with the opportunity to continue replenishment-at-sea training in the out years.

Sub-Sub-Program 3.4.2: Land Environment – Force Element Production, Coordination and Command and Control

The Land Environment Force Element Production, Coordination and Command and Control Program aims to ensure that Land Force capabilities and elements are ready to be employed in Defence operations or deliver Defence services. Results are accomplished by developing and maintaining Land command and control structures that deliver governance through the delivery of: directives, policies and procedures, resource planning and management. It is also responsible to coordinate the force generation of Land Force capabilities and elements for operations performed within the land environment. This Program sustains Defence by directly enabling the Land Environment Force Element Production Program, Land Integration Training Program, and the Land Roles Readiness Sustainment Program, as well as contributes to the Joint and Common programs and the International and Domestic Interoperability Training Program.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

218,559,866 221,351,281 2,791,414
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 1,255 1,175 (80)
Civilian 449 333 (116)
TOTAL 1,704 1,508 (196)

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
A portfolio of Land Force Elements is generated and sustained so as to be continuously available for employment in Defence operations or to deliver Defence services % score of the Land Environment - Force Element Production, Coordination and Command and Control Performance Evaluation Index 90 - 100%

 

N/A
Index still in development

% of land force elements that are employed or filling readiness roles 30 - 45% 45%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The Canadian Army (CA) met all criteria to support Canada First Defence Strategy missions. During FY 2014-15, the flexibility built into the CA’s Managed Readiness Plan (MRP) demonstrated its agility and allowed the CA to respond to changing operational priorities, while ensuring it maintains the necessary ready forces to execute operations. Upgrade and insertion projects are progressing well. Notably, the LAV III upgrade project produced 214 upgraded vehicles (114 of which have been fielded). The CA launched a regeneration strategy to strengthen, renew and regenerate itself by focusing on the retention of currently serving members, thus decreasing recruiting and training costs and slowing the loss of talent and organizational knowledge.

Sub-Sub-Program 3.4.3: Aerospace Environment – Force Element Production, Coordination and Command and Control

The Aerospace Environment Force Element Production, Coordination and Command and Control Program aims to ensure that aerospace force elements are ready to be employed in Defence operations or deliver Defence services. Results are accomplished by developing and maintaining Aerospace command and control structures that deliver governance, directives, policies and procedures, coordination, resource planning and management, exercise overarching control, and advice and direction for and in the aerospace environment. This Program sustains Defence by directly enabling the Aerospace Environment Force Element Production Program, Integration Training Program, and the Aerospace Roles - Readiness Sustainment Program, as well as the International and Domestic Interoperability Training Program. Advice and information are also provided to Maritime Environment, Land Environment, Special Operations Forces, and Joint and Common Force Element Production, Coordination and Control Programs, as required, in order to ensure readiness coordination across all force elements.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

151,698,987 223,857,780 72,158,793
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 1,281 1,063 (218)
Civilian 122 273 151
TOTAL 1,403 1,336 (67)

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
A portfolio of Aerospace Force Elements is generated and sustained so as to be continuously available for employment in Defence operations or to deliver Defence services % score of the Aerospace Environment - Force Element Production, Coordination and Command and Control Performance Evaluation Index 90 - 100%

 

100%

% of aerospace force elements that are employed or filling readiness roles 60 - 75% 12%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Program performance was assessed based on a 90 percent target for the Program’s performance evaluation index and a 60 percent target for aerospace elements employed or filling readiness roles. To put the results in context, the percentage of aerospace force elements that are employed or filling readiness roles represents a single snapshot at the end of the fourth quarter.  This indicator only captures force elements actively employed outside North America and does not include all aircrew and aircraft deployed within North America. In essence, when this snapshot was taken, Defence only required 12 percent of its serviceable aerospace force elements to be employed to meet the demand at that point in time. Additional serviceable aerospace force elements were deployed within North America and were available for re-tasking if required.

The Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) continued to deliver effects along the six lines of operation described in the RCAF Campaign Plan.

FY 2014-15 highlights include:

  • Prioritized the enhancement of force readiness activity by re-aligning and re-balancing capability pillars, specifically to obtain full domestic reach capability in the Arctic and optimum expeditionary capacity;
  • Continued to fully support the development and application of the Plan for the North and improve the RCAF’s ability to operate in the North;
  • Continued to move forward with the development of 2 Air Expeditionary Wing and of a number of expeditionary capability enabling initiatives.
  • Continued to promote the Command, Control, Communications, Computer, Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance strategy within the Department;
  • Worked internally and with the United States Air Force to deliver and interim Processing, Exploitation and Dissemination (PED) capability. Through an Operation IMPACT interim initiative, the RCAF configured two CP-140 Auroras with the ability to support PED missions and established an information gateway for the exchange of full motion video between secure networks;
  • Advanced initiatives associated with greater employment of simulation as a way to reduce training costs and extend service life of major fleets. These initiatives included the production of the RCAF Simulation Strategy 2025, the finalization of governance structures, and the progression of options analysis activities related to the weapons systems trainers project;
  • The 1 Canadian Air Division Family Support Team conducted visits to all RCAF units to monitor and identify present day family challenges; and
  • Efforts to integrate departmental family services initiatives continued to ensure that RCAF families are afforded an opportunity to have their voices heard.

Sub-Sub-Program 3.4.4: Special Operations Forces – Force Element Production, Coordination and Command and Control

The Special Operations Forces Force Element Production, Coordination and Command and Control Program seeks to ensure that Special Operations force elements and capabilities are ready to be employed in Defence operations or deliver Defence services. Results are accomplished by developing and maintaining Special Operations Forces command and control structures that exercise overarching control, deliver governance, directives, policies and procedures, coordination, planning, resource planning and management, and advice and direction in all areas and activities for which Special Operations Forces are assigned roles and responsibility. This Program sustains Defence by directly enabling the Special Operations Force Element Production Program, Integration Training Program, and the Special Operations Roles Readiness Sustainment Program, as well as the International and Domestic Interoperability Training Program. Advice and information are also provided to Maritime Environment, Land Environment, Aerospace Environment, and Joint and Common Force Element Production, Coordination and Control Programs, as required, in order to ensure readiness through coordination and synchronization with national and international partners.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

-   -  
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force -   - -  
Civilian -
TOTAL

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
A portfolio of Special Operations Force Elements is generated and sustained so as to be continuously available for employment in Defence operations or to deliver Defence services % score of the Special Operation Force - Force Element Production, Coordination and Command and Control Performance Evaluation Index 90 -100%

 

N/A
Index still in development

% of special operations force elements that are employed or filling readiness roles 80 - 90% 100%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Special Operations and its effects are achieved across the Defence Program Alignment Architecture. The details regarding how Special Operations achieves and performs assigned tasks are classified. However, sub-sub-programs 3.3.4 Special Operations - Force Element Production and 3.4.4 Special Operations Forces - Force Element Production, Coordination and Command and Control are the areas whereby Special Operations readiness sustainment activities are captured.

For additional information, please see the Defence Special Operations Forces 61 web-page.

Sub-Sub-Program 3.4.5: Joint and Common – Force Element Production, Coordination and Command and Control

The Joint and Common Force Element Production, Coordination and Command and Control Program aims to ensure that Joint and Common force elements are ready to be employed in Defence operations or deliver Defence services. Results are achieved by developing and maintaining Joint and Common command and control structures that deliver governance, directives, policies and procedures, coordination, resource planning and management, exercise overarching control, and advice and direction for and in the Joint and Common military operations context. This Program sustains Defence by directly enabling the Joint and Common Force Element Production Program, Joint Integration Training Program, and Joint and Common Roles Readiness Sustainment Program, as well as the International and Domestic Interoperability Training Program. Advice and information are also provided to Maritime Environment, Land Environment, Aerospace Environment, and Special Operations Forces Force Element Production, Coordination and Control Programs, as required, in order to ensure readiness coordination across all force elements.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

24,313,134 24,739,334 426,199
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 61 57 (4)
Civilian 19 134 115
TOTAL 80 191 111

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
A portfolio of Joint and Common Force Elements is generated and sustained so as to be continuously available for employment in Defence operations or to deliver Defence services % score of the Joint and Common Environment - Force Element Production, Coordination and Command and Control Performance Evaluation Index 90 - 100%

67%

% of joint and common force elements that are employed or filling readiness roles 40 - 55% 50%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

During the reporting period, Defence completed and promulgated CONPLAN JUPITER, which serves as a keystone reference for joint capability force element production. Defence continues to work on force generation and force employment models within capacity and in accordance with other priorities and the intent is to complete force employment models in 2015.

Defence ensured equipment readiness by fostering an equipment-focused culture in order to preserve Canada First Defence Strategy imperatives.

Program 4.0: Defence Capability Element Production

The Defence Capability Element Production Program aims to sustain Defence by producing and maintaining portfolios of the fundamental Defence capability elements so that they are continuously available in the appropriate quantity, combination and condition to sustain the chain of programs delivered by Defence, from the Defence Capability Development and Research Program through to the Defence Ready Force Element Production Program, which collectively give Defence the ability to conduct Defence Combat and Support Operations as well as deliver Defence Services and Contributions to Government. The primary elements of Defence capability are military personnel, materiel and information systems, information, and real property. A fundamental focus of the Defence Capability Element Production Program is to provide an adequate and sustained supply of individual military personnel and materiel in the near-term and over long-term time horizons so that they can be integrated to produce force elements within the Defence Ready Force Element Production Program. Results are achieved through subordinate Programs, each of which focuses on a separate portfolio: military personnel and organization; materiel; real property; or information systems. A lifecycle approach is used to manage each portfolio. The essential aspects of the lifecycle approach are sub-sub-programs that provide the principle lifecycle functions:  introduction into service; maintenance, upgrade and supply; release from service; portfolio management; and overarching co-ordination and control. The character of activity that occurs within each of these primary functions depends on the portfolio of entities being produced and therefore the desegregation of the lifecycle functions into sub-sub-programs is unique to each portfolio. The authority for this Program is derived from the National Defence Act.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

Main Estimates

Planned Spending

Total Authorities Available for Use Actual Spending(authorities used)

Difference
(actual minus planned)

13,086,304,226 12,649,487,661 14,316,908,755 12,504,965,147 (144,522,513)
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 32,022 31,860 (162)
Civilian 17,820 15,803 (2,017)
TOTAL 49,842 47,663 (2,179)
Note: Due to rounding, figures may not add up to total shown.

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
Suitable Defence capability elements are available in a mix and condition that enables Defence to be prepared for and execute operations % of Defence Capability Elements that are suitable to Defence needs 90 - 100% 87%

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In support of Program Expected Results and the organizational priority Maintaining Required CAF Posture and Defence Readiness, Defence implemented CDS direction for CAF force posture and defence readiness horizon 1 to ensure resources were aligned and available to support determined readiness levels.

Defence Capability Element Production Program achievements and performance analysis are detailed under each of the applicable sub and sub-sub-programs.

Sub-Program 4.1: Military Personnel and Organization Lifecycle

The Military Personnel and Organization Lifecycle Program seeks to enable the production of ready force elements and fulfill obligations of Defence Combat and Support Operations, Defence Services and Contributions to Government, and Defence Capability Development and Research through the provision of the military establishment, personnel, and personnel services. The Program also honours and recognizes the service and unique sacrifices of our military personnel, provides for a safe and secure workplace, and ensures the appropriate conduct of Defence military personnel. It ensures that personnel are available in the quantity, mix of occupations and with the requisite occupational skills that provide for an optimized military establishment that enables the readiness and employment of multi-purpose combat capable forces and other Defence services. The Program oversees the availability of Regular and Reserve Force personnel to fulfill the military establishment, and the delivery of services provided to the personnel, including recruitment services; transition and release services; professional development services; occupation training services; morale and well-being services; health care services; compensation and benefits services; honours and recognition services; security, protection, justice and safety services; and the planning and governance of the Program. The Program coordinates the execution of subordinate programs responsible for promoting a unified Defence culture and a safe and secure workplace and the planning and governance of the Program. The authority for this Program is derived from the National Defence Act.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

3,595,518,849 3,771,764,487 176,245,638
Note: The difference is due in part to the variance explained under Sub-Sub-Program 4.1.8: Military Personnel – Health Care.
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 21,628 21,785 157
Civilian 5,546 4,685 (861)
TOTAL 27,174 26,470 (704)
Note: Due to rounding, figures may not add up to total shown.

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
Military personnel with appropriate types of characteristics and attributes are available to meet Defence needs % of Individual occupations that have the manning required to fill established positions at each rank 95 - 100% 76%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Out of the 95 Regular Force occupations, 24 finished the fiscal year with less than 90 percent of their preferred manning level, and were therefore considered to be stressed which was an increase from the previous fiscal year. However, many of the affected occupations are either small, new, have intake primarily from internal programs, or are undergoing a change to their establishment numbers. In all but a few cases, there are a sufficient number of members within the training system to gradually improve the health of these occupations.

Sub-Sub-Program 4.1.1: Military Personnel – Regular Force Portfolio Management

The Military Personnel Regular Force Portfolio Management Program seeks to ensure that the Defence military establishment is optimized with sufficient number of Regular Force personnel, in the appropriate military occupations, possessing the necessary knowledge and skills at the appropriate time in order to continually supply Defence Readiness and satisfy the requirements for military personnel to ensure the delivery of all other programs. Results are achieved through the management of individual military personnel careers and terms of military service as well as the delivery of selection oversight, succession planning, prior learning assessment review, component transfer, posting and appointment, performance appraisal, and administrative review services. The Military Personnel Regular Force Portfolio Management Program sustains Defence by directly enabling the Defence Ready Force Element Production Program, the Defence Services and Contributions to Government Program, and the Defence Capability Development and Research Program.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

386,027,278 348,611,512 (37,415,766)
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 177 191 14
Civilian 231 103 (128)
TOTAL 408 294 (114)

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
Regular Force personnel are available to meet Defence needs % of the total Regular Force establishment that has been filled 95 - 100%

 

98%

% of Trained Effective Regular Force 95 - 100% 92%
% Priority 1 and Priority 2 positions filled 95 - 100% 88%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Despite the gap between the actual performance results and targets, CAF units and Defence organizations adapted to achieve departmental needs within the available levels of Regular Force personnel and fiscal constraints. The actual results have been trending positively towards the targets and are expected to continue to improve with continued focus on intake, training, and retention to develop and sustain the workforce levels necessary to meet the priority position demands.

An extensive review of the CAF Cost Moves Program was conducted in FY 2014-15. This resulted in the implementation of revisions to improve the accuracy and the auditability of the FY 2015-16 Cost Moves Program by reducing the variance between resource demand, funding allocation, and expenditures. The improved accuracy and auditability could also inform a future review of the performance targets to better account for emerging workforce management issues and demographic trends.

In support of this Program and the organizational priority Ensuring Defence Affordability, Defence advanced initiatives to Implement Defence Renewal.

FY 2014-15 highlights include:

  • The modernization of the CAF Career Management Process continued with the implementation of a new planning, analysis, and tracking tool to improve process efficiency. Refinements to the Canadian Forces Personnel Appraisal System continued, including a simplification of the personnel evaluation report process where meaningful feedback is now provided to members in a manner that reduces the workload on supervisors and review boards and lessens the administrative burden at the unit level.
  • The Military Personnel Management Capability Transformation project (Guardian), a modern, flexible and integrated workforce management system, obtained Treasury Board approval on 17 June for implementation of the initial release and conditional approval for the definition of subsequent releases. The project is well-structured and supported to deliver on its objectives. The project has worked with Public Works and Government Services Canada to develop a business case to leverage the Government of Canada payroll solution (Phoenix) as the pay engine for Military Pay. As a result, the project continues in the definition phase, with the first release of Guardian to occur in 2016.

Sub-Sub-Program 4.1.2: Military Personnel – Reserve Force Portfolio Management

The Military Personnel Reserve Force Portfolio Management Program seeks to ensure that the Defence military establishment is optimized with sufficient number of Reserve Force personnel in the appropriate military occupations, possessing the necessary knowledge and skills, at the appropriate time in order to continually supply Defence Ready Force Element Production and satisfy the requirements for military personnel to ensure the delivery of all other programs. Results are achieved through the management of individual military personnel careers and terms of military service as well as the delivery of selection oversight, succession planning, prior learning assessment review, component transfer, appointment, performance appraisal, and administrative review services. The Military Personnel Reserve Force Portfolio Management Program sustains Defence by directly enabling the Defence Ready Force Element Production Program, the Defence Services and Contributions to Government Program, and the Defence Capability Development and Research Program.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

131,203,743 110,056,208 (21,147,534)
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 164 150 (14)
Civilian 13 25 12
TOTAL 177 175 (2)

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
Reserve Force personnel are available to meet Defence needs % Reserve personnel occupations considered manageable or healthy 91 - 100% 59%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Program performance was assessed based on a 91 percent target for reserve personnel occupations considered manageable or healthy.

  • For the Canadian Army Reserve, there is currently some geographic disparity in the number of soldiers unavailable to fulfill the requirements of the service. As a result, the Canadian Army will initiate a Regeneration Plan to determine the cause of personnel pressures linked to attrition and retention, with a view to producing actionable recommendations.
  • Overall the RCAF Air Reserve manning is at about 84 percent of its desired strength, which depicts a fairly healthy Air Reserve Force at this time, however the challenges to growth include higher than anticipated attrition rates, an aging population, and current recruiting processes. Mitigation strategies in place to help meet desired strength levels include dedicating an Air Reserve Chief Warrant Officer to address recruiting issues at the higher levels, as well as the development of alternative attraction and retention strategies, tailored by region where necessary.
  • By the close of year, 33 percent of RCN Naval Reserve classifications were considered healthy and meeting the established Reserve Manning Requirement (RMR). In light of the ongoing DND and CAF initiative to redefine the role of a strategic reserve coupled with the RCN review of the Naval Reserve occupational structure, a conscientious decision was made to target the sustainment of its current manning level as opposed to trying to achieve full RMR. For the 2014-15 recruiting period, the RCN achieved 75 percent of the initial established recruitment goal.

In support of the Program Expected Results, the Compensation for Employers of Reservists Program was launched to assist employers by offsetting the cost incurred by businesses when reservist-employees deploy for military duties, particularly in cases where it may be necessary to hire and train replacements.

In further support of this Program and the organizational priority Strengthening the Defence Team, Defence advanced a comprehensive plan to optimize the military and civilian workforce.

  • Defence continued the May 2013 Vice Chief of the Defence Staff Initiating Directive - Rationalization of the Primary Reserve - Comprehensive Review in order to thoroughly explore, rationalize and incorporate the Reserve component resource into the CAF context, while also focusing on providing proposals to the Government of Canada on strengthening the Reserve for implementation in FY 2015-16.

In support of this Program, Defence advanced initiatives to Implement Defence Renewal that further address the organizational priority Ensuring Defence Affordability. For details, see Sub-Sub-Program 4.1.1: Military Personnel Regular Force Portfolio.

For additional information Canada's Reserve Force 62, please see the supporting webpage to this report.

Sub-Sub-Program 4.1.3: Military Personnel – Recruitment

The Military Personnel Recruitment Program aims to meet the needs of the military establishment and military occupations. Results are achieved by the delivery of attraction, processing, selection and applicant enrolment services. The Military Personnel Recruitment Program sustains Defence by directly enabling the Military Personnel Regular Force Portfolio Management Program and the Military Personnel Reserve Force Portfolio Management Program by ensuring that the needs of the military establishment and military occupations are met.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

75,476,720 88,732,872 13,256,151
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 360 349 (11)
Civilian 47 46 (1)
TOTAL 407 395 (12)

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators    Targets  Actual Results
Military personnel recruitment meets the needs of the military occupation % of the Regular Force external Strategic Intake Plan filled 97 - 101% 101%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Program performance was assessed based on the goal to fill 97 percent of the Regular Force external Strategic Intake Plan (SIP) of 3,600 for FY 2014-15. The overall SIP was met for the CAF in FY 2014-15, including Chief Military Personnel adjusted external in-year increase of Regular Force SIP to 3,900, although not for every individual occupation. Marketing and recruiting efforts were heavily invested towards bringing the best possible candidates to the CAF, in the right occupation at the right time. DND and the CAF delivered three successful recruitment advertising campaigns to help meet the enrolment objectives of the Regular and Reserve Forces. The campaigns, which focused on priority occupations, women, and the readiness of the CAF to deliver excellence in operations, enabled DND and the CAF to reach millions of potential candidates through various means.

In support of Program Expected Results and the organizational priority Ensuring Defence Affordability, Defence implemented a Defence Renewal initiative to modernize the CAF recruiting process.

  • The Recruiting Business Process Renewal initiative will improve the ability to concentrate on priority and threshold occupations leading to better Strategic Intake Plan outcomes. Notable progress achieved during FY 2014-15 includes the creation of the Recruiting Operations Centre. A new centralized model saw the Centre performing the intake management that was previously conducted at 39 detachments across the country; and now, every applicant is able to utilize e-applications. Applications to enrol in the CAF doubled in the past year to 39,000 and 99.9 percent of all applications are done on-line. Additionally, the flow and timings of recruits through the initial training programmes was better aligned with Strategic Intake Planning and training capacity, thereby significantly lowering the numbers of personnel awaiting training from on average 2,000 in 2013 to a forecast of average 600 going forward. The initiative’s modernization efforts provide more representative geographic coverage through e-applications, thus enabling quicker response times from recruiters to applicants, and improving interdepartmental synchronization in managing personnel awaiting training and recruiting Reserve Force personnel.

Sub-Sub-Program 4.1.4: Military Personnel – Transition and Release

The Military Personnel Transition and Release Program seeks to transition military personnel to civilian life. Results are accomplished through preparation for civilian employment or retirement and release administration services. This Program also includes termination of military service for deceased military personnel. The services provided by Military Personnel Transition and Release Program are directed to military personnel.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

12,757,327 11,341,788 (1,415,539)
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 105 113 8
Civilian 0 0 0
TOTAL 105 113 8

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
Released Canadian military personnel have access to programs to assist with transition to civilian life, employment and/or retirement % audits of personnel files that are late 0 - 5% 0%
% releasing military members that are satisfied with the information they received regarding transition programs 70 - 100% 89%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Defence remains committed to caring for its personnel and their families and will provide services to restore the health and optimal functioning of its members or help them transition into civilian life. A series of programs, services, and benefits are available to the ill and injured and their families and are continually monitored to ensure that the services are relevant and meet the needs of our military personnel.

Overall releasing military members are satisfied with the information they receive regarding transition programs. Defence formalized partnerships with third party transition program service providers that continue to provide up to date program information to transitioning members, either directly or through the CAF Transition office. To ensure standardization, the most current presentations and information addressing accessibility to the information were and continue to be made available to transitioning members.

Sub-Sub-Program 4.1.5: Military Personnel – Professional Development Training

The Military Personnel Professional Development Training Program aims to ensure that military personnel are provided with the requisite professional development, knowledge and skills required by the Canadian Profession of Arms. Results are delivered through the delivery of basic military qualification, university and college education, professional military education and development, second official language training, foreign language training, and workplace values training services. The Military Personnel Professional Development Training Program sustains Defence by directly enabling the Military Personnel Regular Force Portfolio Management Program and the Military Personnel Reserve Force Portfolio Management Program.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

699,036,914 757,455,218 58,418,305
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 8,666 7,527 (1,139)
Civilian 902 863 (39)
TOTAL 9,568 8,390 (1,178)

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
Military personnel have the professional education and development to meet the needs of the Defence military establishment % military personnel who disagree that the Canadian Armed Forces Professional Development policies programs support succession planning within the Canadian Armed Forces  < 23.7% 29.5%
% military personnel who disagree that the Canadian Armed Forces Professional Development programs encourage and support self-development among CAF members  < 31.5% 28.7%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Military Personnel Professional Development Training ensures that military personnel are provided with the requisite professional development, knowledge, and skills necessary for the employment in the CAF. Program performance was assessed based on member satisfaction with professional development policies and programs. While 29.5 percent of the members surveyed indicate some dissatisfaction with the policies and programs available to support the development of leaders, limited resources continue to be a challenge and contribute to this dissatisfaction. An additional contributor to dissatisfaction is the impact of increased expectations on members’ ability to acquire higher levels education and a greater number of qualifications, during a period of increasing demands and responsibilities in their workplace, all while balancing work and family responsibilities. Defence will continue to monitor issues related to professional development training.

In support of Program Expected Results and the organizational priority Ensuring Defence Affordability, Defence implemented Defence Renewal initiatives to modernize the CAF individual training and education and to enable the Royal Canadian Air Force to become an agile learning organization through the application of simulation training.

  • The CAF is continuing its efforts to integrate and provide adequate training and development opportunities to acquire leadership skills to enhance CAF personnel’s ability to be professionally developed in a manner consistent with their aspirations, career goals and institutional needs, within available resources. Modernization of the Individual Training & Education system is ongoing. Some activities progressed including the use of rationalized training delivery, enhancements to the Defence Learning Network, integrated systems approach to training, and developments to the CAF Mobile App Store.
  • Under the RCAF Simulation and Synthetic Environment initiative, RCAF orders were amended to strengthen simulation usage and senior advisory boards were implemented for simulation and training.

Sub-Sub-Program 4.1.6: Military Personnel – Occupation Training

The Military Personnel Occupation Training Program seeks to ensure that occupational technical and procedural knowledge and skills are provided to military personnel to make them employable in their respective occupations, exclusive of collective training. Results are achieved through the delivery of initial, intermediate, advanced and specialty occupation training services. The Military Personnel Occupation Training Program sustains Defence by directly enabling the Military Personnel Regular Force Portfolio Management Program and the Military Personnel Reserve Force Portfolio Management Program.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

921,377,481 781,422,015 (139,955,466)
Note: The planned spending for FY 2014-15 was based on FY 2012-13 actual spending which included the global engagement training activities performed by the Royal Canadian Air Force. From FY 2013-14 and onwards, those activities were separated from Sub-Sub-Program 4.1.6: Military Personnel - Occupational Training and are now reported under Sub-Sub-Program 1.3.4: Military Diplomacy and Global Engagement.

 

2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 6,091 6,131 40
Civilian 1,203 764 (439)
TOTAL 7,294 6,895 (399)

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
Military personnel have the education and skills that meet the needs of their occupation and Defence requirements % of Graduates vs. Training Plan target 90 - 100% 98.7%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Improved coordination between the recruiting process and training continues to reduce the time that personnel await occupation training. The occupation training success rate remains very high.

Sub-Sub-Program 4.1.7: Military Personnel – Morale and Well Being

The Military Personnel Morale and Well-Being Program seeks to honour the service and unique sacrifices of our military personnel and sustain and help retain military personnel by meeting basic social and lifestyle needs for themselves and their families, similar to those of other Canadians. Results are accomplished through the recognition of military personnel, serving or retired, veterans, deceased military personnel as well as their families, external individuals, and organizations; and through the delivery of support services such as military family support, military chaplaincy services, and casualty support services to the ill and the injured, and their families. The Military Personnel Morale and Well-Being Program services are primarily focused on military personnel and their families.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

381,456,330 302,748,281 (78,708,049)

 

2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 533 2,063 1,530
Civilian 380 367 (13)
TOTAL 913 2,430 1,517

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargets  Actual Results
The morale and well-being needs of military personnel are met % military members dissatisfied with the quality of life services utilized or available to be utilized < 25% 20.5%
% CAF personnel dissatisfied with the recognition they receive from the organization < 29.9% 29%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Overall, the CAF is doing a satisfactory job meeting its quality of life obligations to members. There is strong satisfaction, as indicated in high-level Your Say Survey measures, for the Military Way of Life, and the rate of members who agreed to stay in the CAF as long as they can, remains very high. This survey result is supported by low Regular Force voluntary attrition. In 2014 increased levels of dissatisfaction continued to be experienced in the belief of the member being looked after if injured on the job. On the other hand dissatisfaction with CAF support to families dropped. Areas of concern, as identified by responses to the Your Say Survey and specific research, will continue to be monitored.

While budgetary and transformational changes may affect some personnel services and support programs, these services and programs remain a leadership priority. CAF members will continue to enjoy a robust and comprehensive compensation and benefits framework, have access to generous and equitable reimbursement programs and services, and have career-long professional development opportunities. Budget implementation plans will be carefully monitored to mitigate adverse impacts on CAF personnel.

The CAF is committed to recognizing its members who make the ultimate sacrifice in the service of their country, those who are injured in the course of duty, and those whose performance is distinguished and worthy of special merit.

Canadian Armed Forces members deployed on Operation IMPACT commemorated Warrant Officer Patrice Vincent and Corporal Nathan Cirillo by naming two of their locations after the members. One of the locations of Air Task Force – Iraq – was named Camp Vincent, in honour of Warrant Officer Vincent, a member of the Royal Canadian Air Force. The operations base of Canadian Special Operations Forces Command in Iraq is now called Patrol Base Cirillo, in honour of Corporal Cirillo, a Canadian Army reservist. The naming coincided with Remembrance Day, which is commemorated annually to remember Canadians who served in the military in past conflicts and especially those who paid the supreme sacrifice.

In support of Program Expected Results and the organizational priority Strengthening the Defence Team, Defence implemented a family-centric model to provide enhanced support to the ill and the injured and to the families of CAF members.

  • A consolidated/integrated Military Family Services operating plan was promulgated in October 2014 and eleven working groups and family panels were formed to address programming challenges and systemic stressors inherent with military life. Military Family Services formalized partnerships with national organizations including Legion, Canadian Mental Health Association, Canadian Medical Association, and Strongest Families, that can play a role in ensuring Canadian communities have requisite skills, knowledge, and awareness to better support military families.

  • To address the increased demand for Joint Personnel Support Unit services, 60 Reserve Force positions were extended to 2017 that were planned for conversion to Regular Force.

Sub-Sub-Program 4.1.8: Military Personnel – Health Care

The Military Personnel Health Care Program aims to enable operational readiness of military personnel by ensuring that Canadian military personnel have access to health services wherever they serve. Given that Canadian military personnel are not covered under the Canada Health Act, the Department of National Defence is mandated to provide health services to members of the Canadian military. Results are achieved through the provision of medical, dental and health care sustainment services. The Military Personnel Health Care Program sustains Defence by directly enabling the Military Personnel Regular Force Portfolio Management Program and the Military Personnel Reserve Force Portfolio Management Program.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

537,310,836 694,710,851 157,400,014
Note: The difference is due to the underestimation of planned spending in this Program.

 

2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 2,965 2,706 (259)
Civilian 1,362 1,254 (108)
TOTAL 4,327 3,960 (367)

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
Health services and health advice meet the needs of military personnel and the organization % Medical Clinic Patient Satisfaction with regard to their treatment and interaction with medical staff 80 - 100%

 77%

% of CAF personnel that are Dentally Fit to deploy on domestic and international operations 90 - 100% 79.2%
% Compliance of Laboratory Subspecialty with external Quality Control by discipline 95 - 100% 97.5%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

CAF members have access to a range of programs while serving in the Forces, including exceptional health services. Program performance was assessed based on three program-specific indicators – wait times for General Mental Health (GMH) initial assessment, average number of treatments provided per physiotherapy patient, and dental fitness status.

Available appointment wait time for an initial assessment for GMH looks at the length of time it takes an individual to have their first assessment with the GMH Program. It provides a widely accepted measure of access to care and a means of comparing GMH wait times across the CAF and is used to identify clinics where further analysis may be required to justify additional resource investment and improve patient flow. Performance was well within target at an average of 19 days.

The average number of in-garrison treatments per physiotherapy patient provides both a measure of effectiveness and, when compared to the average number of treatments required for patients referred to off-base private clinics (11 treatments per patient), a measure of efficiency. Bases that exceed the average are closely monitored to encourage efficiencies that will further maximize productivity. Performance was well within target at 5.3 treatments per patient.

A significant number of Regular Force personnel were deemed to be non-deployable from a dental perspective because they either required ongoing dental care (5.4 percent) or did not present for annual dental fitness exams (15.4 percent). In part, non-compliance with annual exam requirements could be addressed by investing resources to proactively remind personnel of their obligations in this regard. A dental population surveillance project has been initiated to review the operational impact of having a dental readiness level of less than the targeted 90 percent.

To address the organizational priority Strengthening the Defence Team, Defence provided enhanced support to the ill and the injured and to the families of CAF members through various initiatives including:

  • Bolstered the sustainability and effectiveness of the CAF Health Care system by:
    • Monitoring the ongoing performance of the system through the Annual Military Health Program presentation to the Departmental Program Management Board.
    • Progressively introducing evidence based practice guidelines to improve health outcomes.
    • Developing Program activity logic models to inform a next generation Performance Management Framework.
  • Enhanced mental health initiatives, particularly to address Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), including:
    • Implemented an attraction and retention initiative to sustain ongoing staffing and to immediately staff 54 previously never filled public servant mental health clinic positions with mental health professionals including psychologists, social workers, mental health nurses, and addiction counsellors.
    • Optimized use of technology to enhance mental health care by procuring seven virtual reality systems for all Operational Trauma and Stress Support Centres, to support the treatment, education, and rehabilitation of CAF members with anxiety conditions like PTSD.
  • Progressed the development of a robust, interdisciplinary, and harmonized mental health capacity focusing on training and education, prevention, and intervention to enhance the psychological resilience of CAF personnel, achieved the following results:
    • Piloted Unit Road to Mental Readiness (R2MR) Training for a Communications Information Group and initiated development of occupation-specific mental health and resilience training for Military Police, Search and Rescue, and Special Operations personnel.
    • Developed two Smartphone applications to support the uptake and practical application of R2MR arousal management skills taught in the classroom.
    • Produced mental health outreach videos highlighting mental health support programs (You’re Not Alone), peer support and R2MR to assist CAF members and their families.

Sub-Sub-Program 4.1.9: Organization – Security, Protection, Justice and Safety

The Organization Security, Protection, Justice and Safety Program aims to ensure that Defence activities are conducted safely, that the Defence organization is protected and secure from internal and external threats, and that military personnel respect regulations and expectations of the Military Code of Service Discipline. Results are delivered through the coordination and delivery of Military Justice, including the administration of Courts Martial, the delivery of police services, investigation services and criminal intelligence, the provision of custody and detentions services, the development of emergency preparedness tools, the delivery of emergency response services, the delivery of security screening and clearance for personnel and industrial contributors and the delivery of occupational health and safety services and activities. The Organization Security, Protection, Justice and Safety Program services are directed to members of Defence and the public.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

267,222,653 302,781,399 35,558,746
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 1,629 1,607 (22)
Civilian 694 765 71
TOTAL 2,323 2,372 49

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
The Defence military personnel respect regulations and expectations of the Military Code of Service Discipline Average number of court martials in recent years 55-75 73
Defence activities are conducted safely and accidents are prevented % decrease in Injury Frequency Rate for Regular Force and civilians 10% 11%*
Note: Represents FY 2013-14 performance results reported in the Defence OHS Annual Report FY 13-14.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In support of this Program and the organizational priority Ensuring Sustainable Operational Excellence both at Home and Abroad for the Defence of Canada and the Protection of Canadians, Defence sought to develop and implement initiatives to integrate security management into departmental operations.

  • The Director General Defence Security was established 1 April 2014 to protect, promote and support security in DND/CAF activities and operations by executing its functional authority leadership and implementing effective security programs. The establishment of the new Defence Security Program encompasses the activities needed to ensure the safeguarding of information, assets and services from compromise as well as the effective coordination and management of security incidents.
  • In addition, a focus was also on the revitalization of security governance structures, mechanisms, and resources, to manage security at the departmental and government levels, and the protection of employees from workplace violence. The delivery of mandatory on-line security awareness training and a new security policy suite were central to re-establishing a strong security culture with the DND/CAF.
  • Priority was given to the development of the new Departmental Security Plan which is based upon a process of security risk management to ensure decisions for managing security risks were substantiated through analyses and supported by processes which are rigorous, repeated and documented.
  • In addition, continuity of government operations and services in the event of security incidents, disruptions or emergencies was given high priority with the initiation of a DND/CAF NCR Business Continuity Plan.
  • Defence conducted a thorough review and update of the National Defence Security Orders and Directives in order to clearly articulate to all Defence personnel the responsibilities related to the defence security program.
  • Defence advanced the process of consolidating all range safety and field safety programs under a unified governance framework. The processes, procedures and standards being developed will serve to inform operational commanders on the acceptance of risks during the conduct of domestic and international operations where there exists the danger of weapons, ammunition, and/or explosives and/or other relevant field hazards. Several other government departments, agencies, and Allies are being consulted during this process.
  • The Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) Joint Counter Explosive Threat Task Force (JCET TF) prepares military and civilian personnel to operate in volatile environments by identifying and neutralizing threats to protect Canadians and our interests at home and abroad.  During FY 2014-15, JCET TF conducted a top down review of Counter Explosive Threat skills required by all CAF members regardless of rank, position, and service to ensure an interoperable and seamless joint CAF capability. This review was distributed to the services for inclusion into their updates of individual and collective training standards and packages.

In support of this Program and the organizational priority Strengthening the Defence Team, the Defence Occupational Health and Safety Strategy demonstrated success in the implementation of the goals and objectives related to the improvements to the Defence Occupational Health and Safety Program. Further improvements are required regarding the impacts of the effectiveness of the Defence Team through functional direction and guidance and the implementation of a corporate framework for occupational health and safety management.

In support of Program Expected Results and the organizational priority Ensuring Defence Affordability, Defence launched a new Defence Renewal initiative to examine ways to modernize dispatch services for all emergency services that support the CAF. The intent is to examine the current dispatch systems and propose a new model that will improve the efficiency and effectiveness of these services for CAF personnel and their families.

Additional initiatives undertaken throughout FY 2014-15 include:

  • The Strengthening Military Justice in the Defence of Canada Act 63 (Act) received Royal Assent on 19 June 2013. The Act amends the National Defence Act (NDA) to enhance the military justice system, the grievance process and the Canadian Forces Provost Marshal organization. During FY 2014-15, certain NDA amendments came into force with the implementation of necessary changes to the Queen’s Regulations and Orders for the Canadian Forces (QR&O). Throughout the reporting period, Defence continued to advance the coming into force of additional NDA amendments requiring changes to the QR&O. The amendments to the NDA and QR&O will ensure that that military justice system remains effective, fair and transparent. For more information, please see the Defence website 64.
  • The Governor-in-Council assent of the QR&O in May 2014 authorized the promulgation of a new chapter on grievances that more clearly describes the accountabilities and responsibilities of CAF members and those of redress authorities and the Canadian Forces Grievance Authority. At the start of FY 2014-15, more than 600 grievances had been with the initial authority for more than the legislated time limit of four months. Accordingly, on 1 June 2014, Operation RESOLUTION was launched to reduce the backlog. As the operation approached its termination, initial authorities determined 1,400 grievance while reducing the overall backlog from 600 to 100 grievances.
  • In June 2014, Defence launched a new digital grievance platform for the CAF. New capabilities were made available to all CAF members and select initial authorities. Features include an automated grievance registry, the ability to manage grievance portfolios electronically, and the ability to adopt an electronic grievance file management system. Together, these enhancements contributed to a more efficient and responsive grievance system.
  • The Office of the National Defence and Canadian Forces Ombudsman 65 worked on several systemic investigations. A report on the Board of Inquiry process was published; reports on the care of Reservists suffering from operational stress injuries and on Reserve Force compensation neared completion; a pre-mandate investigation into the grenade explosion at CFB Valcartier in 1974 also neared completion and the joint DND/CF/Veterans Ombudsman investigation on the transition of Canadian Armed Forces members from military to civilian life was in the analysis stage.
Sub-Sub-Program 4.1.10: Military Personnel and Organization – Strategic Coordination, Development and Control

The Military Personnel and Organization Strategic Coordination, Development and Control Program seeks to ensure that military personnel and the Defence organization are managed, coordinated and overseen so that military personnel are continually available to supply Defence readiness and satisfy other Defence program delivery requirements. The Program also ensures that the organization meets requirements for safety, security and justice. Results are achieved through planning, design, development, implementation, coordination, control, governance, performance management, reporting, relationship and partnership management, remuneration and advisory services. The Military Personnel and Organization Strategic Coordination, Development and Control Program sustains Defence by directly enabling the Military Personnel and Organization Lifecycle Program. Governance and advisory services also serve Defence by supporting the Strategic Coordination, Development and Control Program of the materiel, real property and info systems capability elements as well as the Operational Readiness Production, Coordination and Control Program, the Overarching Control of Domestic and International Operations, the Defence Capability Development and Research Program, and the Military Heritage and Outreach Program.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

183,649,568 373,904,343 190,254,776
Note: The difference is primarily due to payments related to the Manuge v. Her Majesty the Queen class action lawsuit concerning the Pension Act provision contained in the Canadian Forces Service Income Security Income Plan – Long Term Disability Policy.

 

2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 938 948 10
Civilian 714 498 (216)
TOTAL 1,652 1,446 (206)

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
The strategic coordination, development and control of military personnel and the organization meets Defence needs % Defence Military Personnel and Organization score on the Coordination, Development and Control Performance Evaluation Index 80 - 100% 87.5%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned
  • Defence instituted a new advisory and decision mechanism – the Force Development Forum (FDF) – to aid in overall CAF Capability Based Planning coordination and control. This new FDF is to advise the Chief Force Development on issues of importance concerning CAF and in particular Joint Force capability development. It includes the highest level of capability development advisors from all Defence organizations. By this central coordination, Defence will be able to better plan and implement the direction provided by the Chief of the Defence Staff in Force Capability Guidance in a coherent  and well-coordinated way.

Sub-Program 4.2: Materiel Lifecycle

The Materiel Lifecycle Program aims to provide the defence materiel products and services required to ready Defence force elements and fulfill obligations of Defence Combat and Support Operations, Defence Services and Contributions to Government, and Defence Capability Development and Research activities. It ensures that defence materiel capability elements are available in the quantity, mix and condition that enables the production of ready force element, the employment of multi-purpose combat capable forces, and Defence services. The Program oversees and delivers defence materiel, and the lifecycle management services provided to ensure the availability of defence materiel, including acquisition services; equipment upgrade and insertion services; divestment and disposal services; engineering, testing, production and maintenance services; inventory management and distribution services; investigation, assurance and certification services; and the planning and governance of the Program.  The authority for this Program is derived from the National Defence Act.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

6,133,224,340 5,968,990,396 (164,233,945)
Note: The difference is due in part to the variances explained under sub-sub-programs  4.2.1: Materiel – Portfolio Management, 4.2.2: Materiel: Acquisition, and 4.2.3: Materiel – Equipment Upgrade and Insertion.
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 7,679 7,292 (387)
Civilian 6.704 5,877 (827)
TOTAL 14,383 13,169 (1,214)
Note: Due to rounding, figures may not add up to total shown.

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
Defence materiel is available in the quantity, mix, and condition suitable to meet the needs of Defence % of Defence Materiel Portfolio considered suitable to Readiness Training and Operations 90 - 100% 100% *
* Note: Defence encountered some challenges in generating the required data, and the 100 percent result reported here is based on partial data. Work is underway to fully implement this performance indicator for the FY 2015-16 reporting cycle.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Throughout FY 2014-15, Defence continued to implement the Canada First Defence Strategy, including the delivery of 15 new Chinook medium-to-heavy lift helicopters and a fifth CC-177 strategic transport aircraft to the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF). The acceptance of the first 6 of 28 new CH-148 Cyclone helicopters, to replace the Sea King fleet, are expected early FY 2015-16.

Defence continued to implement the National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy, including continued progress on the design of the Royal Canadian Navy’s Arctic Offshore Patrol Ships and the award of a contract to build the ships in December 2014.

A $137.8 million contract was awarded to General Dynamics Canada of Ottawa for upgrades to the Canadian Armed Forces’ combat net radios and vehicle interface units, which will be employed in the Canadian-built LAV III light armoured vehicles, among other assets.

Defence continued to advance the new Defence Procurement Strategy to ensure that the CAF are provided with the equipment they need in a timely and cost-effective way and with a focus on securing the strongest benefits in terms of high-quality jobs for Canadian industry.

Defence is a participant in the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) and contributes to the Greening Government Operations targets through the Materiel Lifecycle Program. The Department contributes to the Green Procurement and the Sustainable Workplace Operations target areas of Theme IV: Shrinking the Environmental Footprint – Beginning with Government. For additional details on Departmental FSDS activities, see Section III: Supplementary Information - Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy 66.

Sub-Sub-Program 4.2.1: Materiel – Portfolio Management

The Materiel Portfolio Management Program seeks to ensure that defence material, equipment, equipment fleets, and supporting elements, the materiel elements of Defence capabilities, are managed throughout their lifecycle and made available to the production of ready force elements, capability development and research, and Defence services. The Program is primarily focused on ensuring that sufficient types, quantities and mixes of equipment, fleets and associated materials are available and can be delivered to enable the readiness training and the employment of multi-purpose combat capable forces as well as other Defence services. This is accomplished through the delivery of defence materiel portfolio management, coordination, and project planning services. This Program oversees and prompts the suite of services which, in turn, ensure that defence materiel portfolio elements are available and in a condition that allows for their use in military readiness training, operations and Defence services. The Materiel Portfolio Management Program sustains Defence by directly enabling the Defence Ready Force Element Production Program, the Defence Services and Contributions to Government Program, and the Defence Capability Development and Research Program.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

3,257,674,663 3,080,270,242 (177,404,422)
Note: FY 2014-15 planned spending was based on FY 2012-13 actual spending. Actual spending is affected by the non-cyclical nature of Capital Equipment Program expenditures.

 

2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 56 52 (4)
Civilian 439 395 (44)
TOTAL 495 447 (48)

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
Defence materiel, equipment, and equipment fleets are available in the quantity, mix and condition to meet Defence needs % of key fleets available to meet operational and force development tasks in accordance with Canada First Defence Strategy (CFDS) 90 - 100% 84%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Program performance was assessed based against the target to have 90 percent of key fleets available to meet operational and force development tasks in accordance with the CFDS. Actual performance achieved was based on a sampling of equipment fleets. Naval availability rates are trending upward. Air availability rates achieved targeted levels. For the purpose of this metric, the Iroquois and Protecteur Classes were removed from the Royal Canadian Navy portfolio list as they were nearing the end of their lifecycle, and will enter the disposal phase. The divestment of four of the five vessels was approved and declared surplus.

In support of the Program’s Expected Results and the organizational priority Ensuring Defence Affordability, Defence sought to improve investment planning and management to balance CFDS requirements.

  • Defence continued to strengthen the alignment of the national procurement and materiel management programs with the CAF Force Posture and Readiness plan. Development of equipment strategies within the land equipment program were initiated with a view to improving national procurement and business planning processes by ensuring alignment to the plans and priorities of key stakeholders, including the Canadian Army.

Sub-Sub-Program 4.2.2: Materiel – Acquisition

The Materiel Acquisition Program aims to augment the defence materiel portfolio by delivering acquisition services for defence material, equipment, equipment fleets, and supporting elements. This Program is primarily focused on meeting Defence materiel capability needs to enable readiness training and employment of multi-purpose combat capable forces as well as other Defence services. Results are accomplished through the delivery of Major Capital Project, Minor Capital Project, and Minor Capital Equipment Project services. The Materiel Acquisition Program sustains Defence by directly enabling the Materiel Portfolio Management Program which in-turn provides the materiel elements of Defence capabilities for the Defence Ready Force Element Production Program, the Defence Services and Contributions to Government Program, and the Defence Capability Development and Research Program.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

396,268,639 295,876,077 (100,392,562)
Note: FY 2014-15 planned spending was based on FY 2012-13 actual spending. Actual spending is affected by the non-cyclical nature of Capital Equipment Program expenditures.

 

2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 826 711 (115)
Civilian 544 242 (302)
TOTAL 1,370 953 (417)

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
The Defence materiel, equipment and equipment fleets portfolio is augmented in a timely manner to meet Defence needs % CFDS materiel acquisition projects on original schedule 85 - 100%

 40%

% Non-CFDS materiel acquisition projects on original schedule 85 - 100% 28%
% CFDS and Non-CFDS materiel acquisition projects on adjusted schedule 85 - 100% 87%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Based on a sampling of Major Capital Projects, most projects are on track to meet current adjusted scheduled milestones. Aerospace equipment projects experienced delays caused by aircraft not being available to the projects for operational reasons. Eighty six percent of marine projects are on track and one project is awaiting close-out process. A qualification program for project managers is being implemented to help align project manager experience levels with project complexity and risk levels, with the objective of mitigating some of the contributing factors to project slippage.

For detailed information on transformational and major capital projects, see Section III: Supplementary Information – Status Report on Transformational and Major Crown Projects 67 and Status Report on Projects Operating with Specific Treasury Board Approval 68

In support of the Program’s Expected Results and the organizational priority Ensuring Defence Affordability, Defence continued to improve Defence procurement. Defence continued to rebuild a professional project management workforce enabled by the ongoing transition of the Project Management Competency Development Initiative to a steady state. Defence efforts were largely focused on supporting the implementation of the Government of Canada Defence Procurement Strategy to optimize the economic impact of defence procurement and better position the Canadian defence and security industry to be globally competitive.

Defence-specific initiatives from FY 2014-15 include:

  • In June 2014, an updated Defence Acquisition Guide (DAG) for 2015 was released to ensure Canadian industry is better positioned to deliver equipment and services for the CAF over the next 20 years. This refresh to the DAG introduces new initiatives, as well as highlights changes to existing initiatives. Over 60 per cent of the projects have been refreshed, and, to increase engagement DAG 2015 has been expanded to include initiatives of greater interest to industry.
  • The groundwork was laid to introduce an Independent Review Panel for Defence Acquisition (IRPDA). The IRPDA is an independent, third-party challenge function related to the requirements for major procurements and a core component of the strategy.
  • Additional effort towards implementing the export component of the Strategy was made through providing assistance to Canadian industry’s marketing and sales efforts.
  • Consultation with Public Works and Government Services Canada, Industry Canada, International Trade and central agencies, continued with the aim to leverage and streamline objectives of the Strategy, and enhance interdepartmental governance.
  • As part of the Defence Renewal plan, Defence is continuing to improve and streamline the project approval process and enhance departmental governance. See Internal Services, Sub-Program 6.1: Management and Oversight, for further details.
  • Defence provided qualified Project Managers for 90 percent of projects with ratings in the top half of Treasury Board Secretariat's criticality and risk ratings for projects.

In support of this Program and to address the organizational priority Ensuring Defence Affordability, Defence advanced the initiative to Implement Defence Renewal.

  • Departmental procurement remains the most significant initiative to achieve reinvestment in the Defence Renewal programme. In 2014-15, there was increased focus on leveraging Public Works and Government Services Canada’s (PWGSC) Acquisition Card Value Proposition Study that provides recommendations and options for optimizing and increasing acquisition card usage in government procurement. Significant effort has been directed towards identifying linkages to professional development requirements and the development of the procurement community of practice, as well as enhancing departmental efforts to increase procurement capacity and expertise. In order to be successful, however, this initiative relies heavily on achieving synchronization with concurrent PWGSC procurement reform initiatives, industry support to optimize procurement processes, as well as ability to "institutionalize" required changes and sustain momentum after Defence Renewal.

Please see the Defence website, for more information on Investing in Equipment 69 and on Canadian Government Defence Procurement 70.

Sub-Sub-Program 4.2.3: Materiel – Equipment Upgrade and Insertion

The Materiel Equipment Upgrade and Insertion Program seeks to ensure that defence material, equipment, equipment fleets, and supporting elements are upgraded and/or undergo technology insertion. Results are achieved by the delivery of services for maintenance periods, mid-life upgrades and other equipment and platform work programs designed to rejuvenate and update equipment and materiel technologies. The Materiel Equipment Upgrade and Insertion Program sustains Defence by directly enabling the Materiel Portfolio Management Program which in-turn makes the materiel element of Defence capabilities available for the Defence Ready Force Element Production Program, the Defence Services and Contributions to Government Program, and the Defence Capability Development and Research Program.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

733,742,639 519,980,310 (213,762,329)
Note: FY 2014-15 planned spending was based on FY 2012-13 actual spending. Actual spending is affected by the non-cyclical nature of Capital Equipment Program expenditures.

 

2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 942 1,042 100
Civilian 60 338 278
TOTAL 1,002 1,380 378

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
Defence materiel, equipment and equipment fleets are refitted and/or transitioned to meet Defence needs % of Materiel Upgrade and Technological Insertion Projects and Upgrades on adjusted schedule 85 - 100%

 

78%

% of Materiel Upgrade and Technological Insertion Projects and Upgrades on original Treasury Board Secretariat schedule 85 - 100% 30%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Based on a sampling of upgrade and insertion projects, projects are progressing well against adjusted schedule. Notably, maritime projects show a steady improvement in schedule, and the LAV III upgrade project produced 214 upgraded vehicles (114 of which have been fielded by the Canadian Army).

For detailed information on transformational and major capital projects, see Section III: Supplementary Information – Status Report on Transformational and Major Crown Projects 71 and Status Report on Projects Operating with Specific Treasury Board Approval 72.

FY 2014-15 saw the continued successful procurement in the following areas:

  • The first five of twelve Halifax-class frigates completed the modernization program. The ships are HMCS Halifax, Fredericton, Calgary, Winnipeg, and Montreal. The seven remaining ships are at various stages of the modernization with HMCS Toronto as the last frigate scheduled to enter the modernization program in July 2015. The modernized Halifax-class ships bring enhanced capabilities required to meet new threats and changing operating environments. They will also sustain and enhance the operation of the frigates throughout the latter half of their operational life for the Canadian Armed Forces.
  • The Victoria-class submarine fleet reached operational steady state with three (HMCS Victoria, Windsor, and Chicoutimi) out of four submarines available for operations while the fourth (HMCS Corner Brook) undergoes a planned extended docking working period to ensure sustainment of the submarine fleet.
  • The CF-188 Hornet modernization projects, to provide interoperability, survivability and operational capability throughout the lifetime of the CF-18, are on track for completion in 2017. Aircraft availability remains a challenge for any equipment upgrade and insertion project.

Sub-Sub-Program 4.2.4: Materiel – Divestment and Disposal

The Materiel Divestment and Disposal Program seeks to reduce the defence materiel portfolio by delivering divestment and disposal services for material, equipment, equipment fleets and supporting elements. This Program is primarily focused on maintaining the mix and quantity of materiel to meet Defence materiel capability needs. Results are achieved through the delivery of services for asset sales, trade-ins, alternative applications (such as artefacts), donations and monuments, transfers, and scrapping/destruction. The Materiel Divestment and Disposal Program sustains Defence by directly enabling the Materiel Portfolio Management Program which in-turn provides the appropriate mix of materiel elements of Defence capabilities for the Defence Ready Force Element Production Program, the Defence Services and Contributions to Government Program, and the Defence Capability Development and Research Program.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

6,229,987 11,776,958 5,546,971
Note: FY 2014-15 planned spending was based on FY 2012-13 actual spending. Actual spending is affected by the non-cyclical nature of Capital Equipment Program expenditures.
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 6 36 30
Civilian 25 17 (8)
TOTAL 31 53 22

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
Defence materiel, equipment and equipment fleets are reduced in a safe, responsible, and timely manner to meet Defence needs % materiel disposed on schedule 80 - 100% 100%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In support of Program Expected Results and the organizational priority Ensuring Defence Affordability, Defence sought to improve investment planning and management to balance CFDS requirements through an initiative to develop and execute disposal plans to ensure the effective disposal of surplus assets.

Defence completed all seven of its planned major disposal projects of surplus assets. These seven major system disposals were completed on schedule this year. Two planned disposals were delayed for operational reasons as the systems are being retained for a time until a replacement capability is secured.

Sub-Sub-Program 4.2.5: Materiel – Engineering, Test, Production and Maintenance

The Materiel Engineering, Test, Production and Maintenance Program aims to ensure that defence materials, equipment and services satisfy operational and performance requirements and are in condition that allow for their safe use at inception and throughout their lifecycle. Results are accomplished through the delivery of technical review, analysis, examination, testing, certification, quality assurance, and production and maintenance services to the defence materiel portfolio. Also, engineering investigations and analysis services are conducted to address materiel failures as required by the appropriate authorities. The Materiel Engineering, Test, Production and Maintenance Program sustains Defence by enabling the Materiel Portfolio Management Program.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

1,156,126,890 1,427,695,173 271,568,283
Note: The difference is due in part to the underestimation of planned spending in this Program. The difference is further attributable to a year-over-year increase in equipment maintenance costs.

 

2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 3,249 2,808 (441)
Civilian 3,527 3,064 (463)
TOTAL 6,776 5,872 (904)

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
Defence materiel, equipment and equipment fleets are in a condition that meets the needs of Defence % materiel maintenance on schedule 85 - 100% 80%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Program performance was assessed based against the target to have 85 percent of planned materiel maintenance activities on schedule. Actual performance indicates that maritime maintenance was 75 percent on track. Eighty-five per cent of planned third level aerospace maintenance activities were completed on time. However, major structural repairs delayed the remaining planned maintenance activities. Defence is working to resolve some data integrity issues impacting this performance metric.

In the case of the Royal Canadian Navy (RCN), platform serviceability is assured through built-in redundancy of key ship-fitted equipment, reducing the requirement for additional platforms to compensate for equipment malfunction. In addition, platforms are capable of performing a variety of roles based on equipment availability which ensures RCN’s continued ability to conduct its assigned missions in accordance with the force posture and readiness. The aging of the Iroquois and Protecteur classes and challenges in maintaining their serviceability led to the decision to retire four major war vessels early. Capability concerns were identified early and interim measures are currently being brought into effect in advance of the delivery of the Canadian Surface Combatants and the Joint Support Ships. All units tasked under the updated Managed Readiness Plan were serviceable to conduct their assigned missions and training requirements as planned.

The Canadian Army (CA) continues to see limited serviceability rates due to its aging fleets. The CA assesses its major vehicle and equipment fleet serviceability at 60 percent. This number does not reflect the operational capability of the CA to achieve the six missions directed in the Canada First Defence Strategy; it is simply a statement of the serviceability situation of its major vehicle and equipment holdings. Until replacements fleets are fielded, and in order to minimize the impact on readiness, the CA is actively prioritizing the usage of its fleets based on the Managed Readiness Plan. Projects for replacement fleets are in various stages of development and fielding, and are anticipated to improve the situation in the next four years.

Despite on-going issues with aging fleets and the availability of qualified technicians, the Royal Canadian Air Force achieved an overall fleet serviceability rate of 93 percent. Parts availability remains a concern for certain fleets, as serviceability levels can only being achieved by taking parts from other aircraft, which increases maintenance requirements. A funding inject is expected in FY 2015-16 that will begin to mitigate this issue. Additionally, initiation of a Penalty Preventative Maintenance program will also support availability increases in the future.

In support of this Program and the organizational priority Ensuring Defence Affordability Defence advanced the Defence Renewal initiative for maintenance execution.

  • The Defence Team is developing a plan to perform maintenance more effectively and efficiently. Supported by KPMG’s initial on-site assessments of the 3rd Canadian Division in Edmonton, Fleet Maintenance Facility Cape Scott in Halifax, and at 14 Wing in Greenwood, the Defence Team continues to validate baseline reinvestment opportunities.

Sub-Sub-Program 4.2.6: Materiel – Inventory Management and Distribution

The Materiel Inventory Management and Distribution Program aims to ensure that defence material, equipment, equipment fleets and all supporting elements are made available in a timely manner and in the required location to produce ready force elements, conduct operations, and deliver Defence services. Results are achieved through the delivery of transportation, inventory and warehousing management, inventory control, identification and tracking, and Defence postal services for the materiel elements of Defence capabilities and other relevant military elements. The Materiel Inventory Management and Distribution Program sustains Defence by enabling the Materiel Lifecycle Program, the Defence Ready Force Element Production Program, the Defence Capability Development and Research Program, the Defence Services and Contributions to Government Program, and Defence Combat and Support Operations as required.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

515,592,807 570,460,286 54,867,479
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 2,380 2,429 49
Civilian 1,788 1,569 (219)
TOTAL 4,168 3,998 (170)

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargets Actual Results
Defence materiel, equipment and equipment fleets are supplied and made available in a timely manner at the location to meet the needs of Defence % of stock-out on projected materiel requirements < 7.93% 5.78%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In support of the Program’s Expected Results and the organizational priority Ensuring Defence Affordability, Defence continued to improve Defence procurement. Under this Program, specific focus was placed on enhanced training, identification, and re-transfer authorities to continue to ensure compliance integrity as it relates to domestic and international controlled goods obligations.

In support of the organizational priority Ensuring Defence Affordability, Defence successfully progressed several initiatives to modernize inventory management programs in an effort to continue to strengthen the core Control Framework in support of Treasury Board requirements pertaining to procurement, management and control inventories. Key accomplishments include:

  • Completed the inventory of 1st and 2nd Line Ammunition stock, weapons and serial number items within their respective infrastructure.
  • Completed stocktaking of over $6.25 billion of materiel in FY 2014-15:
    • Through the use of the National Stocktaking Project, completed stocktaking of over $1.05 billion of materiel and more than $1.03 billion of materiel stock verifications in FY 2014-15.
    • Through the Chief of the Defence Staff/Deputy Minister Directive on Materiel Accountability, completed stocktaking of over $5.2 billion of selected Defence materiel accounts in the months of November 2014 to January 2015.
  • Defence continued options analysis for an Automatic Identification Technology project.
Sub-Sub-Program 4.2.7: Materiel – Strategic Coordination, Development and Control

The Materiel Strategic Coordination, Development and Control Program aims to ensure that defence material, equipment, equipment fleets and all supporting elements are managed, coordinated and overseen so that they are available for the production of ready force elements and the employment of multi-purpose combat capable forces as well as other Defence services.  Results are achieved through the delivery of planning, design, development, implementation, coordination, control, governance, performance management, reporting, relationship and partnership management, and advice services as they relate to defence materiel in order to meet Defence readiness needs. The Materiel Strategic Coordination, Development and Control Program sustains Defence by enabling the Materiel Lifecycle Program. Governance and advisory services also support the Strategic Coordination, Development and Control Program of the military personnel and organization, real property and info systems capability elements as well as the Operational Readiness Production Coordination and Command and Control Program, the Defence Capability Development and Research Program, and the Defence Services and Contributions to Government Program. Further, this Program includes all international and industrial activities, as well as regulatory programs and the coordination and control of the Airworthiness Program in response to the Aeronautical Act.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

67,588,715 62,931,350 (4,657,365)
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 219 214 (5)
Civilian 291 252 (39)
TOTAL 510 466 (44)

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
The strategic coordination, development and control of Defence material meets Defence needs % Defence Materiel score on the Coordination, Development and Control Performance Evaluation Index 80 - 100% 81.3%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In support of this Program and the organizational priority Ensuring Defence Affordability Defence advanced the Defence Renewal initiative for maintenance program design.

  • The Maintenance Programme Design initiative has carefully used the last 18 months to develop and socialize a solid strategy for going forward. Maintenance programmes being rationalized are showing potential for significant returns and sustainment initiative pilots are also showing promise.  Ambitious objectives for 2015 have been set - and agreed to - by PWGSC and Industry Canada, and they will need to be met in order to achieve Defence Renewal targets. Ultimately, to be successful, the initiative requires acceptance at all levels in several Departments, continued industry support, successful pilots, and significant professional development and communications efforts.

Sub-Program 4.3: Real Property Lifecycle

The Real Property Lifecycle Program provides the real property products and services required to ready Defence force elements and fulfill obligations of Defence Combat and Support Operations, Defence Services and Contributions to Government, and Defence Capability Development and Research activities. It ensures that defence real property capability elements are available in the quantity, mix and condition that enable the production of ready force elements, the employment of multi-purpose combat capable forces, and other Defence services. The Program oversees and delivers real property and the lifecycle management services to ensure the availability of real property, including acquisition and new capability construction services, recapitalization and betterment services, divestment and disposal services, operation, maintenance and repair services, navigation and traffic control services, environment and remediation services, and the planning and governance of the Program. The authority for this Program is derived from the National Defence Act.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

2,227,013,166 1,962,778,579 (264,234,588)
Note: The difference is due in part to the variance explained under Sub-Sub-Program 4.3.1: Real Property – Portfolio Management.
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 1,360 1,466 106
Civilian 4,026 3,839 (187)
TOTAL 5,386 5,305 (81)
Note: Due to rounding, figures may not add up to total shown.

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
Defence real property is available in the quantity, mix, and condition that is suitable to Defence needs % of Defence real property that is suitable to Defence requirements 80 - 100% 92%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Overall, the Defence portfolio meets Defence operational requirements. Areas of concern within the infrastructure portfolio are being prioritized via the Capital Investment Plan. The results are based on the assessments reported in December 2012 Report on the State of Real Property Assets which covered 67 percent of the Defence real property. These results remain valid. Defence is currently revising the methodology to undertake future assessments for suitability of the real property portfolio.

Defence is a participant in the 2013-16 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy and contributes to Theme III and Theme IV targets through the Real Property Lifecycle Program. Please see the Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy 73 for details.

Sub-Sub-Program 4.3.1: Real Property – Portfolio Management

The Real Property Portfolio Management Program seeks to ensure that defence real property is managed holistically throughout its lifecycle so that the condition of Defence real property capability elements is suitable to Defence needs and made available for the production of ready force elements, capability development and research, and Defence services. This is accomplished through real property assessment services, analysis services, requirement identification services, inventory data management, and service delivery coordination for defence real property acquisitions, operations, maintenance and repairs, divestments, disposals, environmental, and remediation services. The Real Property Portfolio Management Program sustains Defence by directly enabling the Ready Force Element Production Program, the Defence Services and Contributions to Government Program, and the Defence Capability Development and Research Program.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

757,023,314 498,577,186 (258,446,128)
Note: FY 2014-15 planned spending was based on FY 2012-13 actual spending. Actual spending is affected by the non-cyclical nature of Real Property acquisition expenditures.

 

2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 4 4 0
Civilian 307 135 (172)
TOTAL 311 139 (172)

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
Defence real property is available in a condition that meets Defence needs Facility condition rating (%) for real property assets 0 - 20%

 38.2%

% of real property maintenance, repairs and recapitalizations expenditures compared to replacement value of Real Property Replacement Costs 3.9% 2.91%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Program performance was assessed based on two program-specific measures – a Facility Condition Index and a ratio of expenditures to replacement value for real property.

The facility condition rating for real property assets results reflect assessments conducted at target bases of CFB Halifax, CFB Borden, and CFB Esquimalt. FY 2014-15 marks the first year of reporting on condition using the Facility Condition Index. Taken on average, the results suggest the infrastructure in these locations requires attention and investments in the portfolio to maintain Defence operational capability.

Defence continues to invest in maintenance and repair as well as the recapitalization of real property assets to ensure the portfolio continues to support Defence capability. The Corporate Capital Construction program provides an enterprise-wide approach that supports strategic investments in the real property portfolio. For maintenance and repair, a pilot project using a centralized management approach was undertaken and results were positive as it enabled earlier confirmation of funding, planning, and tendering. Lower investments in maintenance and repair, largely due to funding pressures, continues to result in a downward pressure on meeting the CFDS target of 3.9 percent of the Real Property Replacement Costs.

In support of this Program and the organizational priority Ensuring Defence Affordability Defence advanced the Defence Renewal initiative to rationalize the Real Property portfolio and to centralize real property management.

  • The initiative to rationalize Real Property portfolio continues to progress as infrastructure and its associated real property replacement cost is removed from the portfolio. In FY 2014-15, 166 building demolition/disposals were completed as was the strategic disposal of Jericho Beach.
  • Defence promulgated the Real Property Management Framework and continued the centralization of the management of real property under a single authority. In April 2014, Defence reduced from nine to four Real Property custodians, the initiative remains on track for 2016 when the Department will maintain a single Real Property custodian. Once completed, Defence will be able to efficiently manage the lifecycle of departmental infrastructure in support of Canadian Armed Forces missions, while providing best value to Canadians.

Sub-Sub-Program 4.3.2: Real Property – Acquisition

The Real Property Acquisition Program seeks to expand or enhance the defence real property assets portfolio through the delivery of purchase, capital leases, new asset construction, or life extension construction services where and when needed in support of new Defence capabilities. Results are achieved through purchase, lease, exchange, gift, easement, transfer, expropriation services or other means as required. The Real Property Acquisition Program sustains Defence by directly enabling the Real Property Portfolio Management Program which in-turn provides the real property elements of Defence capabilities for the Defence Ready Force Element Production Program, the Defence Services and Contributions to Government Program, and the Defence Capability Development and Research Program.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

96,409,824 73,530,390 (22,879,434)
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 12 8 (4)
Civilian 136 122 (14)
TOTAL 148 130 (18)

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
The Defence real property assets portfolio is augmented or extended in a timely manner to meet the needs of Defence % New construction, betterments and recapitalizations on original Treasury Board Secretariat schedule (over $1M) 90 -100%

 

90.2%

% New construction, betterments and recapitalizations on adjusted schedule (over $1M)

90 - 100%

65.4%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The Corporate Capital Construction Program has been working well under a centralized management model. The majority of recapitalization projects were within the planned schedule reported to the Treasury Board Secretariat. However, there has been some slippage associated with project amendments. For detailed information on transformational and major capital projects, see Section III: Supplementary Information – Status Report on Transformational and Major Crown Projects 74 and Status Report on Projects Operating with Specific Treasury Board Approval 75.

In support of this Program and the organizational priority Ensuring Defence Affordability Defence advanced the Defence Renewal initiative to improve Real Property project delivery.

  • Defence is incorporating industry best practices into the Integrated Project Delivery process. This complex initiative involves the collaboration between the Department of National Defence and Defence Construction Canada and work towards improving the project approval process for the department is on-going.

Sub-Sub-Program 4.3.3: Real Property – Divestment and Disposal

The Real Property Divestment and Disposal Program aims to reduce the defence real property portfolio by addressing surplus defence real property capability elements. Results are achieved through timely divestments of real property where and when required to ensure that Defence maintains a relevant real property mix to meet Defence real property capability needs. This is accomplished through site identification services, property assessment services, estimate/appraisal services, solicitation process services, consultation services, negotiation services, and agreement development services. The Real Property Divestment and Disposal Program sustains Defence by directly enabling the Real Property Portfolio Management Program.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

33,085,467 29,537,375 (3,548,092)
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 2 2 0
Civilian 105 45 (60)
TOTAL 107 47 (60)

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsActual Results
Defence real property assets portfolio is reduced in a timely manner to meet Defence needs % surplus real property land area compared to total owned < 1% 0.51%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Real Property Disposals are critical to ensuring a sustainable Real Property portfolio. Divestments reduce pressure on Defence infrastructure maintenance and repair budgets over the longer term and contribute to off-set life-cycle costs of new and recapitalized assets. Defence continues to rationalize its real property portfolio through divestments that do not support program requirements.

Defence both identified surplus real property land area and disposed of it, keeping the percentage surplus below a target of 1 percent during FY 2014-15.

Sub-Sub-Program 4.3.4: Real Property – Operations, Maintenance and Repair

The Real Property Operations, Maintenance and Repair Program aims to provide fundamental services for planned and unplanned maintenance, repair, and overall operation of defence real property capability elements (i.e. buildings, works, and base functions) to ensure its continued availability and suitability to meet the needs of Defence. Results are achieved through real property assets maintenance, repair, and operation services such as grounds keeping, HVAC, waste collection, navigation, air traffic and range control, and the provision of other real property related amenities. The Real Property Operations, Maintenance and Repair Program sustains Defence by enabling the Real Property Portfolio Management Program and enables the Defence Ready Force Element Production Program, the Defence Services and Contributions to Government Program, and the Defence Capability Development and Research Program.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

1,250,146,252 1,230,702,815 (19,443,437)
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 1,315 1,425 110
Civilian 3,259 3,267 8
TOTAL 4,574 4,692 118

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
Defence real property is maintained and repaired in order to meet the needs of Defence % of Residential Housing Units that are of a suitable condition for occupancy by CAF members 85 - 100%

 

87.1%

% real property maintenance and repair investment in relation to Real Property Replacement Cost 1.4% 0.66%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

National data at 31 October reflects that 87 percent of the Canadian Forces Housing Agency (CFHA) managed housing portfolio has been assessed to be in average or better condition. This is a 3 percent improvement in portfolio condition from FY 2013-14 results. This change is primarily related to data updates from disposals, lifecycle replacement of components, and capital investments.

Funding for Maintenance and Repair (M&R) remains a significant DND pressure with M&R trending below the CFDS target of 1.4 percent of Real Property Replacement Cost (RPRC). In FY 2014-15, a pilot project using a centralized funding approach was undertaken and results were positive. The centralized approach supports earlier confirmation of funding, planning and tendering of contracts for M&R projects and services. Building on the positive results of the pilot project, Defence is actively pursuing to continue the centralized approach for M&R.

In support of this Program and the organizational priority Ensuring Defence Affordability Defence advanced the Defence Renewal initiative to optimize facilities management.

  • Defence developed the National Real Property Procurement Strategy. Under this strategy, efficiencies are anticipated to be realized through strategic commodity sourcing, bundling of facility maintenance contracts, and implementing new agreements. The Department has put in place a new service level agreement in the National Capital region and is benefitting from administrative efficiencies.

Sub-Sub-Program 4.3.5: Real Property – Environment and Remediation

The Real Property Environment and Remediation Program aims to enable the production of ready force elements through environmentally sustainable Defence activities, and to ensure that Defence reduces its liability related to real property. Results are accomplished through the delivery of awareness initiatives, and environmental assessment, environmental management, natural resources, communication and consultation services. Additionally, the remediation of defence real property capability elements also achieves results through the delivery of site identification, site assessment, site characterizations, and site classification services as well as sampling, testing, risk management and mitigation, and long-term monitoring services. The Real Property Environment and Remediation Program sustains Defence by directly enabling the Real Property Lifecycle Program as well as the Defence Operational Readiness Production Coordination and Command and Control Program, Organization Security, Protection, Justice and Safety Program, and the Military Personnel and Organization, Materiel, Info Systems Strategic Coordination, Development and Control Programs.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

64,791,317 97,859,245 33,067,928
Note: The difference is due to the underestimation of planned spending in this Program.
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 10 9 (1)
Civilian 181 159 (22)
TOTAL 191 168 (23)

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
Defence reduces its environmental and unexploded ordnance (UXO) liability related to real property % reduction in contaminated sites opening liability (sites which reported liability in the previous fiscal year) 7% 7.1%
# Identified UXO sites legacy assessed per year 40

41

Defence demonstrates responsible and sustainable environmental stewardship % achievement of Federal Sustainable Development Strategy commitments 95 - 100% 97.3%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Preliminary results indicate a reduction of 7.1 percent to the contaminated sites opening liability in FY 2014-15, exceeding the target.

Defence continues to undertake assessments at sites that pose human health or environment risk. During FY 2014-15, 41 sites were assessed, of which one site was assessed as “no risk”, 38 sites were assessed as “low Unexploded Ordnance risk”, and two sites were assessed as “medium risk”.

Defence remains committed to supporting the Government of Canada’s Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS). In FY 2014-15, Defence achieved 97 percent of its FSDS targets. The Department has developed a Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions Reduction Plan to better support the FSDS and GHG goals.

In support of this Program and the organizational priority Ensuring Defence Affordability Defence advanced initiatives to promulgate the Defence environmental strategy.

  • Defence implemented the Defence Environmental Strategy (DES) Management Plans in areas of Equipment, Infrastructure and Internal Services. These ensure environmental considerations are integrated into activities that support the Defence mandate.
  • Within Defence, the management of the Environment is integrated across the entire department. In FY 2014-15, the management of the Environment program was supported by a streamlined governance process as well as the implementation of a new network model that provides information exchange, transparency and collaboration across the department on environmental issues. In addition, Defence developed an environmental directory, accessible to all Defence staff. Collectively, these initiatives support strengthening efficiencies in managing the environmental program in Defence.

Sub-Sub-Program 4.3.6: Real Property – Strategic Coordination, Development and Control

The Real Property Strategic Coordination, Development and Control Program seeks to ensure that defence real property and the natural environment are managed, coordinated and overseen so that it is available for the production of ready force elements and the employment of multi-purpose combat capable forces as well as other Defence services. Results are achieved through planning, design, development, implementation, coordination, control, governance, performance management, reporting, relationship and partnership management, and advice services as they relate to defence real property in order to meet Defence readiness needs and to respond to the Federal Government agenda. The Real Property Strategic Coordination, Development and Control Program sustains Defence by directly enabling Real Property Lifecycle Program. Governance and advisory services also support the Strategic Coordination, Development and Control Program of the military personnel and organization, materiel and info systems capability elements as well as the Operational Readiness Production Coordination and Command and Control Program, the Defence Capability Development and Research Program, and the Defence Services and Contributions to Government Program.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

25,556,991 32,571,568 7,014,576
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 20 18 (2)
Civilian 38 110 72
TOTAL 58 128 70

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
The strategic coordination, development and control of Defence real property meet the needs of Defence % Defence Real Property score on the Coordination, Development and Control Performance Evaluation Index 80 - 100% 62.5%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Under this Program, the management and centralization of Defence real property has continued to evolve and improve. Through real property centralization, Defence Infrastructure and Environment has greater visibility on business processes, controls, risk identification and risk mitigation plans across the real property portfolio. Infrastructure and Environment transformation initiatives, including those associated with Defence Renewal, aimed at improving business processes and strategic coordination, are underway and are being refined. Risks across the Defence real property portfolio are being determined and will be reported through the new governance structure. Management action plans, including risk mitigation, will continue to be developed and implemented where required. Over time, once the transformation initiatives have matured and capacity has been strengthened, it is anticipated that the strategic coordination and controls for the Defence real property portfolio, environment and aboriginal, will be improved.

In support of this Program and the organizational priority Ensuring Sustainable Operational Excellence both at Home and Abroad for the Defence of Canada and the Protection of Canadians, Defence continued to support Government efforts with the legal obligations to the Aboriginal People of Canada.

  • Defence Aboriginal Affairs Network actively engaged Defence officials to increase awareness of Aboriginal issues and exchange information to ensure Aboriginal obligations are addressed.
  • The "Determining if there is Legal Duty to Consult Checklist" continues to be refined in conjunction with the associated policies assisted by the Defence Aboriginal Affairs Network active engagement and collaboration with senior Defence leadership.

In support of this Program and the organizational priority Ensuring Defence Affordability, Defence continued to implement Defence Infrastructure Compliance Strategy.

  • Defence is in the process of developing and aligning the Infrastructure and Environment Compliance Oversight Strategy with the centralized portfolio management under a single custodian. This strategy supports making consistent and informed decisions specifically for the prioritization and risk management of compliance for architectural, fire protection, engineering, environmental and related legislation, and Government of Canada policies and agreements. More specifically, DND and CAF manage an architectural and engineering compliance sampling program, which evaluates and reports on the compliance of nine broad categories of engineering systems, across the portfolio, on a three year cycle. Results of the compliance sampling are provided to custodians for feedback and corrective action. Nuclear Safety has a well-established compliance program that ensures radiological safety for personnel and the environment. Fire service compliance reviews are conducted at all DND and CAF locations approximately every three years, with the objective of verifying that the local fire protection and respiratory protection programs are in compliance with 300 items published within departmental policies and standards. An environmental compliance strategy is being developed.

Under Defence Renewal, the Department continues to pursue opportunities for efficiencies to be gained as it centralizes the management of real property under a single authority. This includes strengthening the strategic coordination function in relation to managing Defence real property assets.

Sub-Program 4.4: Information Systems Lifecycle

The Information Systems Lifecycle Program seeks to ensure that the information systems infrastructure and applications are made available to the production ready force elements, capability development and research, and Defence services and to fulfill obligations of Defence Combat and Support Operations, Defence Services and Contributions to Government, and Defence Capability Development and Research activities. It ensures that the defence information systems infrastructure and applications capability elements are available in the quantity, mix and condition that enables the readiness and employment of multi-purpose combat capable forces and other Defence services. The Program oversees and delivers defence information systems infrastructure and applications, and the lifecycle management services provided to ensure the availability information systems and applications, including acquisition services, development and deployment services, system management and user support services, and the planning and governance of the Program. The authority for this Program is derived from the National Defence Act.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

693,731,305 801,431,686 107,700,381
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 1,355 1,317 (38)
Civilian 1,544 1,402 (142)
TOTAL 2,899 2,719 (180)
Note: Due to rounding, figures may not add up to total shown.

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
Defence information systems and applications are available in the quantity, mix, and condition that is suitable to Defence needs % of time info system networks are available 90 - 100% 100%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The Department’s Information Systems Lifecycle Portfolio is suitable and meets Defence operational requirements. The results are based on the continued availability of its operational systems and applications.

Defence continues to develop initiatives to deliver cost savings through the Defence Renewal Initiative in areas of Applications Portfolio Management, IT Service Management, and IT Governance.

Defence is a participant in the 2013-16 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy and contributes to Theme IV targets through the Information Systems Lifecycle Program. Please see the Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy 76 for details.

Sub-Sub-Program 4.4.1: Info Systems – Portfolio Management

The Info Systems Portfolio Management Program seeks to ensure that defence information systems infrastructure and applications are managed throughout their lifecycle so that the condition of Defence information system capability elements is suitable to Defence needs and made available for the production of ready force elements, capability development and research, and Defence services. It aims to ensure that command, control, communications, computer, intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance application solutions are secure and available in diverse locations where information continuity must be maintained across communication interruptions. This is accomplished through assessment services and identification and coordination for defence information systems acquisition, development, deployment, system management, user support services. The Info Systems Lifecycle Management Program sustains Defence by directly enabling the Defence Ready Force Element Production Program, the Defence Services and Contributions to Government Program, and the Defence Capability Development and Research Program.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

245,288,460 246,338,578 1,050,118
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 92 89 (3)
Civilian 174 139 (35)
TOTAL 266 228 (38)

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
Defence information systems infrastructure and applications are available to meet the needs of Defence % of DND Application Portfolio that is considered healthy 90 - 100% 80%
Note: 80 percent of the Defence application portfolio has been categorized to invest or tolerate.  The remaining 20 percent will be reviewed for suitability and eliminated should they no longer meet Defence needs.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In support of this Program and to address the organizational priority Ensuring Sustainable Operational Excellence both at Home and Abroad for the Defence of Canada and the Protection of Canadians, Defence advanced the following initiatives to Provide an integrated and effective IM and IT environment in support of all Defence operations:

  • Defence is implementing cyber network operations policy, standing up cyber organizations that will protect Defence networks and initiating projects to deliver cyber Defence capabilities.

In support of this Program and to address the organizational priority Ensuring Defence Affordability, Defence advanced the Application Portfolio Management initiative. At the close of FY 2014-15:

  • Defence neared the completion of the application inventory across the CAF and identified mission critical and essential applications. Moving forward, sustainment plans will be developed while the rationalization of duplicate and non-essential applications continues. Application rationalization roadmaps will be developed to assist with future retirement of additional end of life applications.

Sub-Sub-Program 4.4.2: Info Systems – Acquisition, Development and Deployment

The Info Systems Acquisition, Development and Deployment Program seeks to expand or enhance the defence secure information systems infrastructure and applications portfolio by delivering acquisition, development and deployment services to meet defence command, control, communications, computer, intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance needs. Results are achieved through acquisition project development and management services, development project development and management services, testing services, and deployment services. The Info Systems Acquisition, Development and Deployment Program sustains Defence by directly enabling the Info Systems Portfolio Management Program which in-turn provides the materiel elements of Defence capabilities for the Defence Ready Force Element Production Program, the Defence Services and Contributions to Government Program, and the Defence Capability Development and Research Program.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

160,997,860 175,506,480 14,508,620
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 125 114 (11)
Civilian 452 427 (25)
TOTAL 577 541 (36)

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance  Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
The secure Defence information systems portfolio is augmented to meet Defence interoperability needs % Info Systems Capital Projects on Schedule (original timeline) 85 - 100% 89%
% Info Systems Capital Projects on Schedule (adjusted timeline) 85 - 100%

89%

% of Info Systems projects requiring Senior Management attention 4% 0%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In support of this Program and to address the organizational priority Ensuring Sustainable Operational Excellence both at Home and Abroad for the Defence of Canada and the Protection of Canadians Defence sought to Develop and implement initiatives to integrate security management into departmental operations:

  • Defence replaced the Certification and Accreditation Program with the Security Assessment and Authorization Program, which is now being applied for all new IM and IT Systems. Steps are being taken to migrate IM and IT systems currently in their operations and maintenance phase to the new Program.
  • Defence further improved information systems security through development of the National Defence Security Orders and Directives which encapsulate IT security policy.

In support of this Program and to address the organizational priority Ensuring Defence Affordability, Defence advanced the initiative to Implement Defence Renewal.

  • With a focus on IM/IT procurement controls, Defence developed optimized procurement vehicles that are expected to generate cost savings in FY 2015-16. Defence also plans to revise the procurement process for distributed computing assets and is developing a supporting formalized policy instrument; the target for dissemination is in FY 2016-17.

Sub-Sub-Program 4.4.3: Info Systems – System Management and User Support

The Info Systems - System Management and User Support Program aims to provide Defence information system management and user support in a timely manner and in the required location to produce ready force elements, conduct operations, and deliver Defence services. Results are accomplished through the delivery of divestment, problem resolution support, training, and system support services. The Info Systems - System Management and User Support Program sustains Defence by directly enabling the Info Systems Portfolio Management Program, Defence Ready Force Element Production Program, the Defence Services and Contributions to Government Program, and the Defence Capability Development and Research Program.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

186,514,223 218,916,017 32,401,794
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 880 888 8
Civilian 758 729 (29)
TOTAL 1,638 1,617 (21)

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
Defence information systems and user support are available as required to meet the needs of Defence % Canadian Forces Network Operations Centre tickets resolved within Service Level Agreement standard 90 - 100% 89.5%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The Canadian Forces Network Operations Centre resolved 641 of 716 tickets within the Service Level Agreement standard.

In support of this Program and to address the organizational priority Ensuring Sustainable Operational Excellence both at Home and Abroad for the Defence of Canada and the Protection of Canadians, Defence sought to develop and implement initiatives to integrate security management into departmental operations:

  • Defence advanced the renewal of its IM/IT Security policies and standards with a view to ensure networks continue to be secure, available, and accessible when needed.

In support of this Program and to address the organizational priority Ensuring Defence Affordability, Defence advanced activities to Implement Defence Renewal:

  • With active cooperation across the Department, 929 applications were retired within the Defence application portfolio.
  • Defence furthered work to implement a common toolset and IT service catalogue and to consolidate Regional Service Management Centres (RSMC) including detailed planning for the lead RSMC in Halifax, Nova Scotia and the RSMC in the National Capital Region.

Sub-Sub-Program 4.4.4: Info Systems – Strategic Coordination, Development and Control

The Info Systems Strategic Coordination, Development and Control Program seeks to ensure that Defence information systems and applications are secure, managed, coordinated and overseen so that they are available for the production of ready force elements and the employment of multi-purpose combat capable forces as well as other Defence services. Results are delivered through planning, design, development, security assessment, implementation, coordination, control, governance, performance management, reporting, relationship and partnership management, and advice services as they relate to defence information systems and applications. The Info Systems - Strategic Coordination, Development and Control Program sustains Defence by enabling the Information Systems Lifecycle Program. Governance and advisory services also support the Strategic Coordination, Development and Control Program of the military personnel and organization, materiel, and real property capability elements as well as the Operational Readiness Production, Coordination and Command and Control Program, and the Defence Services and Contributions to Government Program, and Defence Capability Development and Research Program.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

100,930,762 160,670,611 59,739,849
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 258 226 (32)
Civilian 160 107 (53)
TOTAL 418 333 (85)

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
The strategic coordination, development and control of Defence information systems and applications meet Defence needs % Defence Info Systems score on the Coordination, Development and Control Performance Evaluation Index 80 - 100% 75%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Defence’s Information Management Group continued to integrate risk in the business planning process. Risk and uncertainties were reviewed, as a minimum, once during the year.  Mitigation plans existed for major areas of concern particularly those linked to Defence priorities, or as a result of audits or reviews. Mitigation plans for most risk areas were implemented as required. Progress follow-up was briefed to the executive on an as required basis.

In support of this Program and to address the organizational priority Ensuring Sustainable Operational Excellence both at Home and Abroad for the Defence of Canada and the Protection of Canadians, Defence advanced initiatives to Provide an integrated and effective IM and IT environment in support of all Defence operations:

  • Through policy, standards and direction, as well as developing new capabilities in the cyber environment, Defence strengthened the ability to defend its networks.
  • A Command, Control, Communication, Computers, Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (C4ISR) Governance Strategy was implemented to help address the capability development issues initially raised by the Office of the Auditor General report in 2005 concerning a lack of coordination of the overall C4ISR program. This Governance Strategy aligns with the extant Defence Capability Board Governance Framework and the newly instituted Force Development Forum. The resulting C4ISR - Info Systems Coordination Mechanism will help to ensure that such systems are developed in a coherent manner across the CAF.
  • A new Defence IM and IT Concept of Operations document was not produced as planned; however, this will be addressed once IM and IT governance is endorsed through the Defence Renewal initiative.

In support of this Program and to address the organizational priority Ensuring Defence Affordability, Defence continued to Implement the transition to Shared Services Canada:

  • Defence continued to strengthen and further develop its relationship with Shared Services Canada to ensure that departmental IM and IT priorities are clearly articulated so Defence’s needs are well understood and met.

In support of this Program and to address the organizational priority Ensuring Defence Affordability, Defence sought to advance the initiative to Implement Defence Renewal.

  • IM/IT governance renewal incurred timeline changes to permit for the development of more granular plans. This initiative is influenced by coordination efforts with the Defence Renewal Lean Headquarters initiative. To move this initiative forward, Gartner Consulting delivered their initial study – a milestone in the development of a plan to deliver a cohesive IM/IT programme, including refined IM governance.

Program 5.0: Defence Capability Development and Research

The Defence Capability Development and Research Program seeks to provide the analytical bases and knowledge to anticipate foreseeable changes in the threat and security environment and to determine the associated demand for Defence capabilities across near- and long-term time horizons in order to enable evidence-based strategic decisions that align the introduction, modification and divestment of Defence capabilities and guide the application of existing capabilities with an acceptable levels of risk. Results are achieved by: establishing and monitoring the fulfillment of near-term targets for readying force elements and conducting Defence operations; identifying lessons from past operations; assessing defence and security trends; developing and integrating new knowledge and systems/methods for conducting operations; developing approaches and conducting Defence capability analyses at strategic, operational and tactical levels; present to future capability assessments; designing and assessing defence alternatives; providing Defence capability oversight and expertise; and Defence capability use planning for sustainable Defence capabilities in future time horizons. As such, this Program sustains Defence by providing key products and services to the Defence Capability Element Production Program, the Defence Ready Force Element Production Program and parts of the Defence Combat and Support Operations, and Defence Services and Contributions to Government Programs. This Program also directly enables the management and oversight of Defence as a whole.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

Main Estimates

Planned Spending

Total Authorities Available for Use Actual Spending (authorities used)

Difference
(actual minus planned)

326,339,123 326,339,123 381,089,627 462,489,089 136,149,966
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 840 788 (52)
Civilian 1,484 1,381 (103)
TOTAL 2,324 2,169 (155)
Note: Due to rounding, figures may not add up to total shown.

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
Defence stakeholders are aware of risks pertaining to the introduction, preparation, application, modification and divestment of Defence capabilities in both the near- and long-term horizons % score on the Defence Capability Development and Research Evaluation Index 81 - 100% 90%

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The Force Capability Guidance (FCG) was endorsed and constitutes strategic guidance to Commanders for force development priorities. It does so by broadly outlining CAF capability requirements in terms of specific capabilities, which are then translated into resources (people, money, and time) in the Investment Plan and the Multi-Year Establishment Plan. The FCG is a document that will be adjusted either based on Defence policy changes or fresh data from scenario assessments. Currently, it is envisaged that this document could be refreshed as required to inform senior leader discussions as to the future form of the CAF.

Sub-Program 5.1: Capability Design, Development and Integration

The Capability Design, Development and Integration Program provides focused expertise to develop and introduce new capabilities, develop new knowledge, integrate knowledge from internal and external sources, develop new concepts, innovate ways to provide competitive advantage to military operations, and enhance the effectiveness of Defence programs. Results from this Program are accomplished by: developing, demonstrating, testing and evaluating advanced systems and technologies and integrating these and other scientific research into Defence programs;  identifying lessons from on-going and historical operations; producing new concepts and doctrine; designing and assessing alternative capabilities; providing planning, oversight and expertise for the introduction and divestment of capabilities; and developing analyses to enable evidence-based decisions concerning the selection and effective use of capabilities at strategic, operational and tactical levels. The products and services from this Program sustain Defence by directly enabling the Strategic Direction and Planning Support Program.  They also enable aspects of the Defence Capability Element Production Program, the Defence Ready Force Element Production Program, and the Programs that deliver Defence Combat and Support Operations as well as Defence Services and Contributions to Government.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

305,548,337 385,285,335 79,736,999
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 755 708 (47)
Civilian 1,432 1,312 (120)
TOTAL 2,187 2,020 (167)
Note: Due to rounding, figures may not add up to total shown.

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
Plans which make adjustments to the elements of Defence capability are established, aligned and monitored % score on the Capability Design Development and Integration Evaluation Index 81 - 100% 90%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Chief Force Development reviewed existing concepts, consolidated key objectives and produced a revised C4ISR operating concept and a new Joint Intelligence, Surveillance & Reconnaissance (ISR) operating concept. These concepts build on past experience, operational lessons and sustained engagement with Allies in operations, exercises, and experimentation activities.

Sub-Sub-Program 5.1.1: Capability Design and Management

The Capability Design and Management Program oversee the execution of activities that conceive, design, develop and introduce new or modify existing Defence capabilities which provide the ability to achieve a desired effect during the execution of a defence operation or the delivery of a Defence service. Defence capabilities are formed of various combinations of force elements, the entities that execute the tasks to achieve desired effects during an operation. This Program applies system-of-systems approaches to describe, analyse, design, and manage each individual capability as a system of capability elements (i.e., military personnel, materiel and information systems, information, and real property) which must be suitably integrated in order to produce new or enhanced force elements. Results are achieved through the oversight of Defence capability requirements specification, conception, and design; and the oversight and coordination of individual capability elements delivery and process specification for force element integration. This Program sustains Defence by directly enabling the Strategic Capability Planning Support Program and the lifecycle management Programs responsible for the production, maintenance, and retirement of Defence capability elements. It also influences the Operational Readiness Production, Coordination and Command and Control Program.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

50,726,977 72,419,483 21,692,506
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 279 250 (29)
Civilian 45 14 (31)
TOTAL 324 264 (60)

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
Options to modify Defence capabilities in order to fill individual capability gaps are produced % score on the Capability Design and Management Evaluation Index 81 - 100% 90%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In support of this Program and the organizational priority Strengthening the Defence Team, Defence advanced a comprehensive plan to optimize the military and civilian workforce.

  • Continued to develop the processes for a Multi-Year Establishment Plan that validates and prioritizes military and civilian personnel requirements based on current and future known manning pressures associated with joint and common defence requirements and the force development of new or emerging capabilities.
Sub-Sub-Program 5.1.2: Concept, Doctrine Development and Warfare Experimentation

The Concept, Doctrine Development and Warfare Experimentation Program seeks to achieve predictability and reliability of performance and thereby realize enhanced opportunities for success and reduce the risk of failure when delivering Defence operations and services. Results are achieved by this Program through conception, development, and testing of the principles, methods and approaches that in-turn become the concepts, doctrine and standards that guide how tasks should be performed at the strategic, operational and tactical levels during the delivery of Defence Combat and Support Operations and Defence Services and Contributions to Government.  Innovations in the development and assessment of new concepts and doctrine are enabled through military experimentation services and related modelling and simulation services. Fundamental to this Program is the delivery of services that provide for the collection, analysis, synthesis and distribution and integration of lessons learned from past operations. The products and services provided by this Program sustain Defence by directly enabling the Capability Design and Management Program and the Overarching Command and Control of Domestic and International Operations Program. This Program is also a key enabler to the Operational Readiness Production, Coordination and Command and Control Program.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

64,116,183 77,823,794 13,707,611
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 372 366 (6)
Civilian 53 52 (1)
TOTAL 425 418 (7)

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
Operational concepts and doctrine improve agility during the introduction, preparation and application of Defence capabilities % score on the State of Concept and Doctrine Evaluation Index 81 - 100%

 

53%

Experimental testing determines the suitability of new military concepts, doctrine, methods and systems for Defence needs % score on the Warfare Experimentation Quality and Impact  Evaluation Index 81 - 100% 100%
Lessons learned from past operations are integrated to improve agility during the introduction, preparation and application of Defence capabilities % score on the Lessons Learned Quality and Impact Evaluation Index 81 - 100% 79%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Performance for the Concept, Doctrine Development and Warfare Experimentation Program was assessed against the goal of achieving 81 percent success against three evaluation indexes. The State of Concept and Doctrine Evaluation Index result indicates a reduced output. This is due to personnel shortages experienced in the doctrine cell during the fiscal year, competing priorities for pan DND/CAF subject matter experts contributing to doctrine, and changes in policy causing doctrine undergoing update to become outdated prior to publication. The Lessons Learned Quality and Impact Evaluation Index focus is solely on efforts through the Canadian Forces Warfare Centre. Actual results indicate further work is required to fully integrate lessons learned efforts across Defence.

In support of Program Expected Results and the organizational priority Ensuring Defence Affordability, Defence implemented Defence Renewal initiatives to develop simulation and synthetic environment capabilities with a view to improve joint capability development and training effectiveness. These initiatives included:

  • Producing the RCAF Simulation Strategy 2025 and establishing an implementation project;
  • Developing the capability for networking key RCAF, RCN, and CA simulation assets; and
  • Advancing contracting for the implementation of significant joint synthetic training optimization activities.

In further support of the Program’s Expected Results, Defence completed the roll out of the SMaRT database that will enable better decision-making support by mapping readiness capability and linking force posture and readiness output with departmental resource allocation processes.

Sub-Sub-Program 5.1.3: Science and Systems Development and Integration

The Science and Systems Development and Integration Program aims to develop and synthesize new knowledge and integrate advancements in science, systems and technology to provide a competitive advantage in military operations and enhance the effectiveness of other defence programs. It also seeks to synthesize information and develop methods and analyses to enable evidence-based decisions concerning the effective use of Defence capabilities and improvements to the delivery of defence programs at strategic, operational and tactical levels across current and future time horizons. Results are achieved by this Program through: the conduct of basic research using scientific methods, the delivery of advanced systems and systems concepts; the testing and evaluation of existing systems and technologies; human systems integration; the development of advanced analyses; and the integration of science into other defence programs. The innovations and advancements in science, systems and technology that are delivered by this Program sustain Defence by enabling the Capability Design and Management Program, the Concept Doctrine Development and Warfare Experimentation Program, and in some cases, the Overarching Command and Control of Domestic and International Operations Program. The products and services provided by this Program for the purpose of evidence-based decision making sustain Defence by enabling each of the sub-programs within Defence Capability Development and Integration Program as well as the Coordination and Command and Control programs that govern delivery of: Defence Combat and Support Operations; Defence Services and Assistance to Government; Defence Ready Force Element Production; and Defence Capability Element Production. This Program also directly supports the management and oversight of Defence as a whole.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

190,705,176 235,042,059 44,336,882
Note: The difference is due primarily to the underestimation of planned spending for this Program.
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 104 92 (12)
Civilian 1,334 1,246 (88)
TOTAL 1,438 1,338 (100)

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
Bodies of knowledge, technologies and systems are explored, developed and integrated to realize enhanced levels of agility during the preparation and application of Defence capabilities % score on the Development and Integration Evaluation Index 80 - 100%

 

80%

Strategic and operational decisions that affect the agility of Defence are evidence based and informed by analytical methods, models and tools % score on the Exploitation of Advice and Knowledge Evaluation Index 80 - 100% 81%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Performance for the Science and Systems Development and Integration program was assessed against the goal of achieving 80 percent success against three internal and two external (client feedback) project-level key indicators. Actual internal performance achieved was scope (83 percent), schedule (82 percent), and budget (75 percent). Actual external performance achieved was scope (86 percent) and schedule (85 percent). This is the first reporting period to include external performance indicators. High client satisfaction can be attributed, in part, to a new program formulation process which has enhanced alignment with the priorities of Defence stakeholders.

To provide an integrated and effective IM and IT environment in support of all Defence operations and address the organizational priority Ensuring Sustainable Operational Excellence both at Home and Abroad for the Defence of Canada and the Protection of Canadians, the Automated Cyber Defence Capability (ACDC) initiative was provisionally approved as a significant new investment for proactively dealing with cyber vulnerabilities and mitigating attacks in near real-time. The goal of ACDC is to develop a complete cyber defence capability for the CAF that would reduce timescales for decision making, thus enabling a more rapid response to cyber threats. ACDC will significantly leverage enhanced mutual reliance with 5-Eyes partners. This investment will be distributed among three existing projects. A component of ACDC will be incorporated into the Cyber Capability Development Centre project which is to move from the definition to implementation phase in FY 2016-17.

To Exercise Arctic sovereignty and further support the organizational priority Ensuring Sustainable Operational Excellence both at Home and Abroad for the Defence of Canada and the Protection of Canadians, the CAF Joint Arctic Experiment 2014 77 was conducted from August 18 to 26 at Canadian Forces Station Alert. The experiment brought together members of the CAF and scientists from Defence Research and Development Canada to test unmanned systems technology in arctic conditions and demonstrate how it can be used to support future CAF operations in the North. The results of all the experiments conducted during 2014 supports the CAF, Environment Canada, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, Public Safety Canada partners, United States Northern Command and other allies.

Other highlights for FY 2014-15 include, the successful testing of newly developed countermeasures and surveillance techniques making Canada the only known country to have the capacity to counter laser beam rider threats against ships. The Royal Canadian Navy expressed very strong support for the continued development of this capability in support of increasing the survivability of naval ships against optically-assisted threats in littoral environments and in the open ocean. Future deployment of a prototype, as a prelude to fleet-wide exploitation, is being considered. The technology has also shown potential applications in the areas of ice detection for ships and long range laser communications, as well as having potential applications in both the Land and Air environments. Work is underway to seek an extension of the activity to include countering laser target designators.

Sub-Program 5.2: Strategic Direction and Planning Support

The Strategic Direction and Planning Support Program aims to identify the strategic demand for Defence capabilities and to enable strategic decisions and the development of strategic direction concerning the corresponding use of available resources to: apply and maintain existing capabilities; introduce new or modified capabilities; and divest of surplus capabilities with acceptable levels of risk across near- and long-term time horizons. In the near-term, a quantifiable relationship is established between Government and strategic direction, ongoing and contingency operations requirements and performance, defence roles, and readiness targets in order to align force element production resources. In the long-term, challenge areas that may require changes to the Defence capability and program portfolios are established. Results are achieved through monitoring, threat and security environment analysis, change requirement identification, trend synthesis, portfolio challenge identification, and portfolio alteration approach formulation and assessment. This Program sustains Defence by directly enabling the Defence Ready Force Element Production Program, the Defence Capability Element Production Program, the Defence Capability Development and Research Program, and the management and oversight of Defence as a whole.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned SpendingActual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

20,790,786 77,203,754 56,412,968
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 85 80 (5)
Civilian 52 69 17
TOTAL 137 149 12
Note: Due to rounding, figures may not add up to total shown.

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
Plans that align the supply and demand for Defence capabilities in near-, mid-, and future-time horizons are established and monitored % score on the Future Capability Planning Strategic Direction and Planning Support Evaluation Index 81 - 100%

 

50%

% score on the Force Posture and Readiness Strategic Direction and Planning Support Evaluation Index 81 - 100% 70%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Program performance was based on two evaluation indexes assessing the future capability and force posture and readiness (FP&R) strategic direction.

Future Capability Guidance (FCG) was issued by the Chief of the Defence Staff. The Capability Based Planning final report and FCG are being used to justify investment, divestment or sustainment of capabilities. Implementation of a performance management strategy to track progress against the FCG remains to be developed.

In FY 2014-15, FP&R activities were described and characterized CAF readiness output in sufficient detail to provide adequate direction to Defence organizations to support RCN, CA and RCAF-led readiness activities. Ongoing efforts to refocus FP&R direction and improve readiness data collection will provide better decision-making support in FY 2015-16.

Sub-Sub-Program 5.2.1: Strategic Capability Planning Support

The Strategic Capability Planning Support Program provides the analyses that determine the overarching portfolio of all capabilities that will be required to successfully defend Canada and promote Canadian interests in future time horizons. This is accomplished through the assessments of Defence policy, direction from the Government of Canada, the external environment, internal performance, the strategic threat environment and the envelope of available resources. Modifying the capability portfolio typically requires decisions and precursor initiatives to take place in near-term time horizons and these are either initiated or facilitated by this Program. Results are achieved by this Program through activities that: identify required military effects; determine the capabilities needed to generate these effects; assess current and planned capabilities of defence against these needs; oversee the conception of possible approaches to mitigate capability shortfalls and reduce capability surpluses; facilitate decisions to determine which approaches are to be pursued; and develop high-level plans to enable and align programs that will deliver new capabilities and divest existing capabilities. The products and services provided by this Program sustain Defence by directly enabling the Capability Design and Management Program, as well as the Concept, Doctrine Development and Warfare Experimentation Program and the Science and Systems Development and Integration Program. Additionally, the broad evidence-based analyses provided by this Program directly enable the strategic management and oversight of Defence as a whole. This Program also has secondary influence on the co-ordination, development and control programs that govern the lifecycles of the capability elements.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

17,886,167 75,119,761 57,233,594
Note: The difference is due to an increase in actual spending for CAF intelligence.
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 64 61 (3)
Civilian 52 69 17
TOTAL 116 130 14

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
Awareness of expected differences between the supply and demand across the portfolio of Defence capabilities is established for mid- and long-term horizons % score on the Strategic Capability Planning Support  Evaluation Index 81 - 100% 68%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Program performance was based on an evaluation index assessing three expected outcomes for strategic capability planning support. The aggregate result for all three of these outcomes equated to a sum total of 68 percent which fell outside of the target threshold of 81 to 100 percent. The key determinant in not achieving the threshold is that leadership had not yet had the opportunity to draft and implement a plan to address the resource shortfall identified through the annual Capital Investment Program Plan Review. It is anticipated this performance result will improve once departmental direction is provided with respect to available resources versus anticipated capability demand.

In support of Program Expected Results and the organizational priority Ensuring Sustainable Operational Excellence both at Home and Abroad for the Defence of Canada and the Protection of Canadians in order to provide an integrated and effective IM and IT environment in support of all Defence operations, Defence issued an initiating directive to establish Defensive Cyber Operations and continues to develop the capability in consultation with other government departments.

In further support of the Program and the organizational priority Ensuring Defence Affordability in order to improve investment planning and management to balance CFDS requirements, Defence provided a life-cycle cost estimate for the Future Fighter Capability that has been independently verified by third-party audit firms. The same life-cycle framework is now being institutionalized across all major capital projects.

In further support of this Program, in FY 2014-15 the Defence Engagement Program (DEP) awarded 26 grants to academic institutions and think tanks across Canada and abroad, and engaged ten experts on key defence policy issues through its Expert Briefing Series. The DEP is a $500,000 per year program with a mandate to support a strong Canadian knowledge base on contemporary security and defence issues that is relevant to Canadian defence policy and capable of informing, confirming, and/or challenging the Department’s policy thinking.

Sub-Sub-Program 5.2.2: Strategic Force Posture Planning Support

The Strategic Force Posture Planning Support Program aims to maintain the sustainability of Defence’s Force Posture towards the achievement of Government of Canada expectations for Defence operations. Force Posture is a collective term used by Defence to characterize the balance in the operational state of force elements within Defence’s portfolio. Force elements may be in one of three operational states. They are either delivering Defence operations or services, ready to respond to operational contingencies, or in a state of reduced readiness. Readiness, which is an intrinsic part of Force Posture, refers to the capability, responsiveness, quantity and endurance requirements that force elements must meet in order to improve the potential for success and reduce undue risks when they are employed on operations. A balanced Force Posture, including the achievement of readiness targets, must be maintained to achieve effectiveness in the delivery of Defence operations and services across time. This Program establishes and manages the adjustment of near-term Force Posture and readiness targets and provides a bridge to longer-term capability planning. Results are achieved through monitoring, analysis and planning based on strategic direction as well as risk and opportunity assessments. The Strategic Force Posture Planning Support Program sustains Defence by directly enabling the Overarching Command and Control of Domestic and International Operations Program, the Operational Readiness Production, Coordination and Command and Control Program, and the management and oversight of Defence as a whole.

 

2014-15 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending

Difference
(actual minus planned)

2,904,619 2,083,993 (820,626)
2014-15 Human Resources (FTEs)
  PlannedActual

Difference
(actual minus planned)

Military – Regular Force 21 19 (2)
Civilian 0 0 0
TOTAL 21 19 (2)

 

Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators  Targets  Actual Results
Awareness of the expected differences between the supply and demand for existing Defence capabilities is established for the near- and mid-term horizon % score on the Strategic Force Posture Planning Support Evaluation Index 81 - 100% 75%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The force posture and readiness process to capture and communicate readiness information was sufficient to provide CAF readiness assessments in FY 2014-15. Improvements to enable robust analysis and recommendations are required. Continued FP&R development throughout the year should yield significant improvements in FY 2015-16.

In support of Program Expected Results and the organizational priority Ensuring Defence Affordability, Defence implemented Defence Renewal initiatives to align mandated missions to CAF force posture and readiness (FP&R) so as to establish a link between FP&R requirements and resource expenditure.

  • Defence continued to develop the FP&R cost capturing process as well as an alignment with the business planning process. An established link between FP&R and resource expenditure by Program will permit more efficient allocation of resources pertaining to readiness.