Department of National Defence - Departmental Performance Report 2013-14

MINISTER'S MESSAGE

This image is a photograph of the Honourable Robert Nicholson, P.C., Q.C., M.P., Minister of National Defence

The Honourable Robert Nicholson, P.C., Q.C., M.P. - Minister of National Defence

It is my pleasure to report to Parliament and Canadians on the achievements of the Department of National Defence (DND) and the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) 1 for 2013-14.

Over the past year, DND and the CAF continued to successfully fulfill the roles and missions identified in the Canada First Defence Strategy (CFDS) in support of Government of Canada priorities.  The CAF are among the best in the world, and continue to deliver on their core mandate: delivering excellence at home, being a strong and reliable partner in the defence of North America, and projecting leadership abroad by making meaningful contributions to international security.

A defining chapter in our history came to a close in March 2014 with the end of Canada’s military engagement in Afghanistan. For more than 12 years, working alongside our allies and as part of NATO’s International Security Assistance Force, the CAF conducted operations and activities including combat, security, support and training operations in varying capacities and regions in Afghanistan. Since the beginning of the mission, more than 40,000 CAF members deployed to Afghanistan, making it the largest deployment of CAF personnel since the Second World War. 

Ensuring the safety and security of Canada and Canadians has always been, and will remain, the top priority for Defence.  At home, the CAF conducted a number of domestic operations, including in Canada’s North, where they exercised Arctic sovereignty through operations and exercises, such as Operations NANOOK, NUNAKPUT and NUNALIVUT. Defence worked tirelessly with federal partners to provide lifesaving search and rescue, responding to more than 9,000 calls. When disastrous flooding hit Southern Alberta in June 2013, approximately 2,300 CAF personnel quickly responded to a request for disaster support assistance by the Government of Alberta.

The defence of North American territory is a natural and important extension of the CAF’s domestic mission.  In 2013-14, Canada worked closely with the United States in the defence of the continent through the North American Aerospace Defence Command (NORAD), and engaged in a wide range of bilateral exercises and training to continue improving interoperability and bolster our ability to respond to crises.

Elsewhere internationally, as part of Operations CARIBBE, the campaign against illicit trafficking in the Caribbean basin and eastern Pacific Ocean, and ARTEMIS, counter-terrorism and maritime security operations in the Arabian Sea, the CAF played a role in disrupting the shipment of approximately 15 metric tonnes of drugs world-wide. As well, in response to the devastating Typhoon Haiyan, CAF’s Disaster Assistance and Response Team provided immediate assistance to the people and government of the Philippines, which included providing nearly 500,000 litres of water and treating more than 6,500 patients.  

Operational achievements were possible because the right tools and training were in place as a result of the CFDS. The delivery of the CAF’s first new Chinook helicopters in 2013 provides increased mobility and flexibility to our forces. Additionally, the Defence Procurement Strategy, announced in February 2014, provides a clear plan to improve the government’s ability to acquire military equipment and bolster economic prosperity across Canada.  Likewise, the Defence Renewal initiative, launched in October 2013, establishes a vision for a more efficient Defence Team that delivers value for money and encourages innovation at all levels. These renewal activities, aimed at shaping a lean, operationally-focused organization, allow for reinvestment in front-line capabilities. Defence also made strides in modernizing the Defence Team through the use of new technologies, partnerships, and improvements to business processes through the government’s Blueprint 2020 initiative.

As has been described, the Defence organization of today is operating in a landscape that has transformed considerably since 2008. Within this new operating environment, the Speech from the Throne in October 2013 announced a renewal of the CFDS. We have already begun to undertake this important work, building on the strong base established in 2008. 

At the centre of all defence achievements are the hardworking men and women, both military and civilian members, of the Defence Team. Defence remains committed to supporting and strengthening the Defence Team – ensuring CAF personnel have access to timely, high-quality support they need.

In 2013-14, Defence further increased support to its mental health program. The CAF Surgeon General’s Mental Health Strategy, released in October 2013, identified opportunities and priorities to further evolve our mental health system to better address CAF needs now and in the future.  Defence is already putting this plan into action. Defence has commenced implementation of the action plan which identified seven strategic priorities that will ensure CAF personnel are equipped with the competencies, tools and support necessary to provide the best possible preventive measures and mental health care.

I am proud of the efforts of Canada’s Defence Team through the course of 2013-14 and it is my privilege to present the achievements of this great institution to my fellow Parliamentarians and Canadians.

 

The original version was signed by:
The Honourable Robert Nicholson, P.C., Q.C., M.P.
Minister of National Defence

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

In fiscal year (FY) 2013-14, Defence successfully carried out its assigned missions, continued to deliver on our Defence Priorities while supporting the Government of Canada’s domestic and global priorities, and carried out the defence mission while ensuring sound financial management of the Defence budget and stewardship of public resources.

Readiness to Respond

In line with the CFDS, the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) maintained the flexibility and preparedness required to deploy in response to Government direction in 2013-14. The CAF remained ready to defend Canada and North America and to meet the complexity of evolving international challenges, to contribute to international peace and stability, and to deploy military forces to support partners and allies around the world.

Defence maintained a Force Posture and Readiness that ensured the CAF stood strategically and operationally ready to respond to defence and security tasks and missions, in collaboration with
whole-of-government and international partners.

Vaious fleets experienced issues including maintenance personnel qualifications, fleet age, and capacity. Defence was able to generate and deliver for employment sufficient units to meet standing and emergent Government of Canada objectives. This success was achieved through managed readiness plans, strict prioritization of resources in those units and platforms available for force generation, and a rationalization of training delivery methods. Defence continued to demonstrate that it is a flexible, professional, and highly skilled force able to deploy at a moment’s notice and deliver operational excellence in Canada and abroad.

Equipping the Canadian Armed Forces

Defence continues to see success in delivering on the CFDS commitments to modernize and upgrade its equipment capabilities to position Canadian soldiers, sailors and airmen and women for success and generate economic opportunities nation-wide. The Government of Canada remained committed to ensuring the necessary equipment was available for Defence training and operations in FY 2013-14 and into the future:

  • The National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy (NSPS) Secretariat announced Vancouver Shipyards will commence construction of the Joint Support Ships in the 2016-17 timeframe. This means that the first ship would be anticipated in 2019. The NSPS will replace the Royal Canadian Navy’s current surface fleets, which are reaching the end of their operational lives.
  • In October 2013, the Canadian Army (CA) began field tests on the Tactical Armoured Patrol Vehicle (TAPV), one of four major acquisitions to augment the CA’s Family of Land Combat Vehicles. The TAPV is part of a fleet of multipurpose vehicles that represent an improvement over the LAV IIs (Coyote) and Armoured Patrol Vehicles (RG-31). They will be used in domestic and expeditionary operations and will perform a number of critical roles, including reconnaissance and surveillance, command and control, and cargo and armoured personnel carrier duties. The men and women of the CA will be provided an excellent multi-role combat capability, protecting them from a variety of threats, while enabling them to remain mobile and agile when executing a wide variety of missions.
  • On June 27, 2013, the Government of Canada welcomed the delivery of the CAF’s first new CH-147F Chinook helicopter. Since then, all 15 aircraft have been delivered. This represents a new capability for the CAF that enhances its ability to operate in remote and isolated areas, and increase its capacity to respond to a wide variety of humanitarian emergencies across the continent, such as fires, floods, and earthquakes.

For details, see Program 1.3 Equipment Acquisition and Disposal and Section III: Supplementary Information – Status Report on Transformational and Major Crown Projects 2.

The Canadian Armed Forces Training Centre opened in summer 2013, improving the Defence Team’s capabilities to support future safety and security challenges in the North. The Centre was opened two years ahead of the forecasted deadline and at $35 million less than the original budget estimate. The program was conceived through a whole-of-government partnership leveraging existing Natural Resources Canada facilities and resident expertise in Resolute Bay, Nunavut. For details, see Sub-Sub-Program 2.2.4.2: Land Infrastructure Maintenance and Base Support.

Excellence in Operations

In 2013-14, the CAF continued to ensure the protection of sovereignty and the safety and security of Canadian citizens by maintaining a strong presence across Canada including monitoring air and sea approaches, providing  search and rescue assistance to those in distress, and helping first responders when emergency situations or catastrophic events occur. The CAF’s response to flooding in Southern Alberta in June 2013 is evidence of our ability to respond quickly in times of crises. Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) Search and Rescue assets, Canadian Army Regular Force troops and reservists, as well as sailors from local naval reserve units in the area were deployed as part of Op LENTUS 13-1. At its peak, 2,300 CAF Regular and Reserve Force personnel were deployed to assist provincial authorities in mitigating damage caused by flooding.

Defence exercised its significant role in the North in supporting other government departments, exercising Canada’s sovereignty, and providing assistance to Canadians. To this effect, the CAF conducted a series of annual Arctic operations and exercises including NANOOK, NUNAKPUT and NUNALIVUT. These operations enhance the CAF’s ability to operate in the Arctic, strengthen and develop whole-of-government partnerships, and maintain interoperability amongst northern partners. Furthermore, these operations prepare the CAF for real emergencies, such as the one that occurred on June 25 when 11 hunters and 20 tourists were stranded on an Arctic ice floe. RCAF personnel and assets assisted in the rescue. In coordination with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, the Emergency Measures Organization Iqaluit and other parties, the CAF were able to return the hunters and tourists safely home.

Internationally, the CAF worked alongside our allies as part of NATO’s International Security Assistance Force to facilitate training across every facet of military operations transferring vital skills to the national security forces of Afghanistan. In November, members of the Disaster Assistance Response Team and the Defence Team deployed to the Philippines to provide expertise in humanitarian relief in the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan. Under Operations ARTEMIS and CARIBBE, Defence demonstrated excellence in maritime security, successfully intercepting and destroying narcotics shipments.

In March 2014, Canada concluded its 12-year military commitment in Afghanistan. To mark the end of our country’s mission in Afghanistan, the Government of Canada invited Canadians to take part in the National Day of Honour on May 9, 2014. The ceremony on Parliament Hill paid tribute to the fallen, the sacrifices of the wounded, and the special burden borne by families. Canadians were invited to honour the legacy of these heroes with a national moment of silence.

In July 2013, the Afghanistan Memorial Vigil was unveiled to honour the service of more than 40,000 CAF members who have served in Afghanistan or worked in support of the mission elsewhere. It consists of the original memorial plaques from the Kandahar Airfield Cenotaph. The series of plaques are dedicated to the lives lost during the pursuit of peace and security in Afghanistan – including those of Canadian Armed Forces members, a Canadian diplomat, a Canadian civilian contractor, a Canadian journalist, and U.S. Armed Forces members who were under Canadian command.

Care to Ill and Injured CAF Members

The Government of Canada has a fundamental commitment to our military personnel in recognition of the sacrifices they make and the services they provide. Released in October 2013, the CAF Surgeon General’s Mental Health Strategy includes an expansion of the comprehensive mental health training and education system; measures to mitigate stigma and barriers to care; an increase in Public Service mental health providers to enhance clinical capacity and improve the health outcomes of CAF members; and continued investment in health surveillance and research that are critical to optimizing policy and program delivery. Defence increased support to its mental health program, providing ongoing care to ill and injured Canadian Armed Forces members, and reducing the stigma associated with mental injuries. For details, see Sub-Sub-Program 2.4.2.6: Military Health Care and Program 4.1 Defence Team Personnel Support.

Defence Change and Renewal

Over the past several years, the Defence landscape has changed dramatically. Defence has seen the end of Canada’s mission in Afghanistan and a series of Government-wide spending reviews to improve Government efficiency.

The Government of Canada continues to work to reduce government spending, and Defence is doing its part to ensure prudent stewardship of taxpayer dollars through the implementation of government-wide spending reviews, as well as undertaking efforts to improve defence procurement practices. This provides Defence an opportunity to rebalance resources and adapt to the new operating environment that the CAF face today.

Canadian First Defence Strategy Renewal

As announced in the Speech from the Throne on October 16, 2013, Defence has started to undertake the renewal of the CFDS. This revised strategy will build on the successes of the CFDS established in 2008, which provided a strong defence policy framework during a period of high operational tempo.

Defence Renewal Program

On October 7, 2013, the Defence Renewal Team formally launched the Defence Renewal Program. This team of dedicated military and civilian personnel have the important mandate to lead, coordinate, and drive a comprehensive, organization-wide business process renewal program to find ways for Defence to become more efficient and effective, with generated savings to be reinvested into operational capabilities and readiness.

Defence Renewal has established strategic initiatives and will set up the conditions for continual improvements to departmental business processes. Generated savings from these initiatives will be reinvested into operational capabilities and readiness. Defence Renewal is a long-term and continuous initiative which will deliver the modern first class military envisioned in the Government’s CFDS, sustain the operational excellence for which Defence is known, and continue to earn the support and trust of Canadians.

Defence Procurement Strategy

The Defence Procurement Strategy, launched in February 2014, will improve the Government’s ability to acquire the military equipment necessary for our forces to meet future threats. Through the Defence Procurement Strategy, the Government reaffirmed its commitment to invest in the capabilities of the CAF, invest in the growth of defence and security industries, and bolster the economic prosperity of the country. This strategy represents a fundamental change in the approach to defence procurement as it streamlines decision-making and ensures a whole-of-government process.

Carling Campus Initiative

In collaboration with Public Works and Government Services Canada and Shared Services Canada, Defence continued to advance the consolidation of Defence headquarters at Nortel’s former Carling Campus. This major consolidation project represents an exciting milestone for the Defence's renewal strategy - aimed at finding efficiencies to be reinvested in operational capabilities and readiness. Not only will it dramatically reduce the number of locations for National Defence Headquarters, but it will also position the Defence Team to successfully meet future roles and responsibilities by facilitating the modernization of headquarters operations. The additional $160 million savings for the Department in cost avoidance achieved from this consolidation will help bolster renewal efforts aimed at reinvesting in front-line services as opposed to corporate overhead.

Real Property Management

The Defence Real Property Strategy received approval in October 2013. With a new infrastructure and environment business model, Defence began the transformation to centralized Real Property Management to improve efficiency and effectiveness. Early achievements have already been seen, including the consolidation of Real Property Management from nine custodians to four and the centralization of information technology support centres across the country.

Shared Services

Defence and Shared Services Canada continued their successful collaboration to delineate responsibilities, manage issues and ensure that CAF operations remain supported.

Public Service Renewal

In accordance with the Government of Canada’s Blueprint 2020 vision of a re-aligned and high-performing public service, Defence is building upon its strengths and made strides in modernizing the Defence Team through the use of new technologies, partnerships, and improvements to business processes. Defence also took steps towards improving the supporting infrastructure and critical enabling technology to facilitate more timely civilian human resource management. Several core technology and infrastructure projects identified for FY 2013-14 were completed with a primary focus on business requirements analysis, identification and options analysis.

SECTION I: ORGANIZATIONAL EXPENDITURE OVERVIEW

ORGANIZATIONAL PROFILE

Appropriate Minister: The Honourable Robert Nicholson, P.C., Q.C., M.P.

Institutional Head: Deputy Minister Richard B. Fadden

Chief of the Defence Staff: General Thomas J. Lawson, CMM, CD

Ministerial Portfolio: Department of National Defence, Canadian Armed Forces, Communications Security Establishment 3, Military Police Complaints Commission 4, Military Grievances External Review Committee 5, Office of the Communications Security Establishment Commissioner 6.

Enabling Instruments: National Defence Act 7, Emergencies Act 8, Aeronautics Act 9, Fisheries Act 10. For further information, see the Legislation and National Defence 11 page on the Defence website.

Year of Incorporation / Commencement: 1923

Other: For further information, see the About Us 12 page on the Defence web site.

ORGANIZATIONAL CONTEXT

Raison d'être and Responsibilities

On behalf of the people of Canada, the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) and the Department of National Defence (DND) stand ready to perform three key roles:

  • Defend Canada - by delivering excellence at home;
  • Defend North America - by being a strong and reliable partner with the United States in the defence of the continent; and
  • Contribute to International Peace and Security - by projecting leadership abroad.

The National Defence Act establishes DND and the CAF as separate entities, operating within an integrated National Defence Headquarters, as they pursue their primary responsibility of providing defence for Canada and Canadians.

Released in 2008, the Canada First Defence Strategy 13 sets a detailed roadmap for the modernization of the Canadian Armed Forces into a first-class military that can deliver on these roles. The Strategy also commits National Defence to the execution of six core missions:

  • Conduct daily domestic and continental operations, including in the Arctic and through the North American Aerospace Defence Command (NORAD);
  • Support a major international event in Canada;
  • Respond to a major terrorist attack;
  • Support civil authorities during a crisis in Canada such as a natural disaster;
  • Lead and/or conduct a major international operation for an extended period; and
  • Deploy forces in response to crises elsewhere in the world for shorter periods.

In 2013-14, Defence successfully carried out its assigned missions while accomplishing the defence activities highlighted in the 2013-14 Report on Plans and Priorities:

  • Conduct training operations in Afghanistan and prepare the Afghan National Security Forces to take over full control for the country’s security in 2014;
  • Continue to deliver on our Defence Priorities while supporting the Government of Canada’s domestic and global priorities; and
  • Carry out the defence mission while ensuring sound financial management of the Defence budget and stewardship of public resources.

This Defence mandate is the responsibility of the Minister of National Defence (MND). The MND presides over the Department and over all matters relating to National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces, as established by the National Defence Act. He is assisted by the Deputy Minister (DM), who is appointed by Cabinet on the advice of the Prime Minister and is the MND’s most senior civilian advisor, authorized under the law to carry out, on the Minister’s behalf, many aspects of the management and direction of the Department. He is responsible for policy advice, departmental management, interdepartmental coordination, international defence relations, public service renewal, federal-provincial relations, and portfolio management. He is also an Accounting Officer under the Financial Administration Act and is accountable before Parliamentary Committees to provide explanations on matters for which he is responsible. The Chief of the Defence Staff (CDS) has direct responsibility for the command, control and administration of the Canadian Armed Forces, and is appointed by the Governor-in-Council, on the advice of the Prime Minister. The CDS advises the MND on issues such as current and future military requirements, force capabilities, and possible courses of action and the military consequences of undertaking (or failing to undertake) various armed forces activities. The CDS is accountable to the MND for the conduct of all CAF activities, as well as for the readiness and the ability to fulfill military commitments and obligations undertaken by the government. Whenever required, the CDS also advises the Prime Minister and Cabinet directly on major military developments and issues.

Strategic Outcomes and Program Alignment Architecture

The Government of Canada’s, Management Resources and Results Structure 14 (MRRS) is the foundation of a government-wide approach aimed at strengthening the management and accountability of public expenditures and clearly demonstrating results for Canadians. The Program Alignment Architecture (PAA) is part of the MRRS. Defence’s PAA shows how its Programs align with the Department’s four strategic outcomes. Internal Services is a stand-alone Program which defines activities and resources that support the organization’s program needs and corporate obligations.

1.0 Strategic Outcome: Resources are Delivered to Meet Government Defence Expectations

1.1 Program: Defence Science and Technology

1.1.1 Sub-Program: Research, Technology and Analysis
1.1.2 Sub-Program: Public Security, Science and Technology

1.2 Program: Recruiting of Personnel and Initial Training

1.2.1 Sub-Program: Recruitment

1.2.1.1 Sub-Sub-Program: Regular Recruitment
1.2.1.2 Sub-Sub-Program: Reserve Recruitment
1.2.1.3 Sub-Sub-Program: Civilian Recruitment

1.2.2 Sub-Program: Training to Initial Occupation Level

1.2.2.1 Sub-Sub-Program: Basic Individual Military Qualifications Training
1.2.2.2 Sub-Sub-Program: Initial Individual Occupation Training
1.2.2.3 Sub-Sub-Program: Initial Individual (Primary) Reserve Training

1.3 Program: Equipment Acquisition and Disposal

1.3.1 Sub-Program: Maritime Equipment Acquisition and Disposal
1.3.2 Sub-Program: Land Equipment Acquisition and Disposal
1.3.3 Sub-Program: Aerospace Equipment Acquisition and Disposal
1.3.4 Sub-Program: Joint and Common Support Equipment Acquisition and Disposal
1.3.5 Sub-Program: Joint and Common Command and Control Acquisition and Disposal

1.4 Program: Real Property Infrastructure Acquisition and Disposal

1.4.1 Sub-Program: Real Property Acquisition and Disposal

1.4.1.1 Sub-Sub-Program: Maritime Real Property Acquisition and Disposal
1.4.1.2 Sub-Sub-Program: Land Real Property Acquisition and Disposal
1.4.1.3 Sub-Sub-Program: Aerospace Real Property Acquisition and Disposal
1.4.1.4 Sub-Sub-Program: Joint Real Property Acquisition and Disposal

2.0 Strategic Outcome: National Defence is Ready to Meet Government Defence Expectations

2.1 Program: Maritime Readiness

2.1.1 Sub-Program: Contingency Task Group
2.1.2 Sub-Program: National Task Group
2.1.3 Sub-Program: Single Ship International Deployment
2.1.4 Sub-Program: Domestic Maritime Readiness
2.1.5 Sub-Program: Sustain Maritime Readiness

2.1.5.1 Sub-Sub-Program: Maritime Training
2.1.5.2 Sub-Sub-Program: Maritime Infrastructure Maintenance and Base Support
2.1.5.3 Sub-Sub-Program: Maritime Equipment Maintenance
2.1.5.4 Sub-Sub-Program: Maritime Command and Control

2.2 Program: Land Readiness

2.2.1 Sub-Program: Primary International Commitment
2.2.2 Sub-Program: Secondary International Commitment
2.2.3 Sub-Program: Domestic and Standing Government of Canada Tasks
2.2.4 Sub-Program: Sustain Land Forces

2.2.4.1 Sub-Sub-Program: Land Training
2.2.4.2 Sub-Sub-Program: Land Infrastructure Maintenance and Base Support
2.2.4.3 Sub-Sub-Program: Land Equipment Maintenance
2.2.4.4 Sub-Sub-Program: Land Command and Control

2.3 Program: Aerospace Readiness

2.3.1 Sub-Program: Aerospace Force Application
2.3.2 Sub-Program: Air Mobility
2.3.3 Sub-Program: Tactical Helicopter
2.3.4 Sub-Program: Aerospace Intelligence, Surveillance, Reconnaissance and Control
2.3.5 Sub-Program: Air Expeditionary Support
2.3.6 Sub-Program : Sustain Aerospace Forces

2.3.6.1 Sub-Sub-Program: Aerospace Training
2.3.6.2 Sub-Sub-Program: Aerospace Infrastructure Maintenance and Wing Support
2.3.6.3 Sub-Sub-Program: Aerospace Equipment Maintenance
2.3.6.4 Sub-Sub-Program: Aerospace Command and Control

2.4 Program: Joint and Common Readiness

2.4.1 Sub-Program: Joint Operations Readiness

2.4.1.1 Sub-Sub-Program: Special Ops Readiness
2.4.1.2 Sub-Sub-Program: Disaster and Special Assistance Readiness
2.4.1.3 Sub-Sub-Program: Joint Command and Control Readiness

2.4.2 Sub-Program: Common Defence Support

2.4.2.1 Sub-Sub-Program: Common Training
2.4.2.2 Sub-Sub-Program: Common Infrastructure Maintenance and Base Support
2.4.2.3 Sub-Sub-Program: Common Supply and Maintenance Support
2.4.2.4 Sub-Sub-Program: General Support, Joint and Theatre Support Units
2.4.2.5 Sub-Sub-Program: Interoperability Training in Support of Continental Operations
2.4.2.6 Sub-Sub-Program: Military Health Care

3.0 Strategic Outcome: Defence Operations Improve Peace, Stability and Security Wherever Deployed

3.1 Program: Situational Awareness

3.1.1 Sub-Program: Conduct Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance
3.1.2 Sub-Program : Support to Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance

3.2 Program: Canadian Peace, Stability and Security

3.2.1 Sub-Program: Canadian Sovereignty Operations
3.2.2 Sub-Program: Canadian Disaster Relief and Humanitarian Assistance Operations
3.2.3 Sub-Program: Canadian Peace and Stability Operations
3.2.4 Sub-Program: Search and Rescue

3.3 Program: Continental Peace, Stability and Security

3.3.1 Sub-Program: Continental Contingency Operations
3.3.2 Sub-Program: North American Aerospace Defence Command

3.4 Program: International Peace, Stability and Security

3.4.1 Sub-Program: Coalition Operations
3.4.2 Sub-Program: Military Diplomacy
3.4.3 Sub-Program: International Disaster Relief and Humanitarian Assistance Operations

4.0 Strategic Outcome: Care and Support to the Canadian Armed Forces and Contribution to Canadian Society

4.1 Program: Defence Team Personnel Support

4.1.1 Sub-Program: Military Personnel Support Services

4.1.1.1 Sub-Sub-Program: Common Professional Development
4.1.1.2 Sub-Sub-Program: Military Housing
4.1.1.3 Sub-Sub-Program: Career Management and Relocation
4.1.1.4 Sub-Sub-Program: Military Family and Casualty Support
4.1.1.5 Sub-Sub-Program: Individual Well-Being and the Work Environment
4.1.1.6 Sub-Sub-Program: Honour and Recognition

4.1.2 Sub-Program: Learning and Career Centres

4.2 Program: Canadian Identity

4.2.1 Sub-Program: Cadets
4.2.2 Sub-Program: History, Protocol and Heritage Ceremonial Activities

4.3 Program: Environmental Protection and Stewardship

4.3.1 Sub-Program: Environment
4.3.2 Sub-Program: Unexploded Ordnance

4.4 Program: Non-Security Support

4.4.1 Sub-Program: Support to the Federal Government
4.4.2 Sub-Program: Support to Other Organizations

Internal Services 

For descriptions of Defence Strategic Outcomes and associated Programs, please refer to Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome.

Organizational Priorities

Organizational priorities express the key areas of focus for Defence to accomplish its mission to “defend Canada and Canadian interests and values while contributing to international peace and security”. They provide emphasis for senior management to direct resources to key initiatives required to address gaps in achieving the PAA expected results, to mitigate key Corporate Risks and to respond to specific Government direction.

A noteworthy development in Defence’s organizational priorities was the formal launch of the Defence Renewal Program on October 7, 2013 by the Defence Renewal Team. Some of the original organizational priority plans identified in the 2013-14 Report on Plans and Priorities 15 (RPP) were incorporated into the Defence Renewal effort to create efficiencies and improve processes that will prepare Defence for the challenges of the future. Defence’s organizational priority plans are listed in the table below with links to Section II of this report where key accomplishments are discussed. 

PriorityType1Strategic Outcomes
Ensuring Sustainable Operational Excellence both at Home and Abroad for the Defence of Canada and the Protection of Canadians

 Previously committed to 16

This priority contributes to:

  1. Defence Operations Improve Peace, Stability and Security
  2. Care and Support to Canadian Armed Forces and Contribution to Canadian Society

 

Summary of Progress

Original plans and links to key accomplishments:

  • Exercise Arctic Sovereignty
    • The CAF conducted a series of annual Arctic operations demonstrating sovereignty and improving capabilities and partnerships with other northern organizations. Additionally, in January 2014, Defence released a plan that serves as the basis for detailed long-term planning in the North (see Program 3.2 Canadian Peace, Stability and Security)
  • Maintain training momentum of the Canadian Contribution Training Mission - Afghanistan (CCTM-A)
    • In March 2014, Canada concluded its military training mission in Afghanistan. CAF members facilitated training across every facet of military operations transferring vital skills to the national security forces of Afghanistan. (see Program 3.4 International Peace, Stability and Security)
  • Develop and implement initiatives to provide an integrated, secure and effective Information Management (IM) and Information Technology (IT) environment in support of all Defence operations
    • Defence continued its ongoing collaboration with Shared Services Canada on IM/IT capabilities and security, and advanced the transformation of the IM/IT environment under Defence Renewal. (see 5.1 Internal Services)
  • Develop and implement initiatives to integrate security management into departmental operations
    • Defence implemented DND/CAF security reforms to address critical vulnerabilities and manage risk to DND/CAF operations. (see 5.1 Internal Services)
  • Support Government efforts for commemoration of important anniversaries
    • To mark the end of our country's mission in Afghanistan, the Government of Canada invited Canadians to take part in the National Day of Honour to pay tribute to the fallen, the sacrifices of the wounded, and the special burden borne by families. The CAF participated in War of 1812 and World Wars commemorative events to remember the achievements of Canadians at pivotal moments in our history. (see Program 4.2 Canadian Identity)

1 Type is defined as follows: previously committed to—committed to in the first or second fiscal year prior to the subject year of the report; ongoing—committed to at least three fiscal years prior to the subject year of the report; and new—newly committed to in the reporting year of the Report on Plans and Priorities or the Departmental Performance Report.

PriorityTypeStrategic Outcomes
Maintaining Required CAF Posture and Defence Readiness Previously committed to

This priority contributes to all four Strategic Outcomes

Summary of Progress

Original plans and links to key accomplishments:

  • Implement CDS Direction for CAF Force Posture and Readiness in Horizon 1
  • Advance CAF Transformation
    • Defence improved the alignment of its command and control functionality in the National Capital Region and stood up senior executive committees to oversee financial resources and investments, and functional and administrative policy. (see 5.1 Internal Services)
  • Assess implications of evolving strategic and fiscal context for CFDS implementation
    • Defence commenced preparatory work for renewal of the CFDS after it was announced in the Speech from the Throne. (see 5.1 Internal Services
PriorityTypeStrategic Outcome(s)
Ensuring Defence Affordability Previously committed to

This priority contributes to:

1. Resources are Delivered to Meet Government Defence Expectations
4. Care and Support to Canadian Armed Forces and Contribution to Canadian Society

Summary of Progress

Original plans and links to key accomplishments:

  • Improve management of the Investment Plan to balance CFDS requirements
    • Defence submitted Investment Plan 2013 to Treasury Board Secretariat (TBS) for consideration and is developing and implementing processes to improve investment forecasts and project analysis. (see 5.1 Internal Services)
  • Develop and implement a Defence business management capability
    • The Defence Business Management Program was reorganized under Defence Renewal. (see 5.1 Internal Services)
  • Implement the Administrative Services Review
    • Defence and Shared Services Canada continued their collaboration to delineate responsibilities, manage issues and ensure that CAF operations remain supported. (see 5.1 Internal Services)
  • Improve Defence procurement
    • Canada’s new Defence Procurement Strategy was launched and represents a fundamental change in the government’s approach to procurement. Defence continued its efforts to professionalize its Material Acquisition and Support workforce and to improve upon the handling of controlled goods. (see Program 1.3 Equipment Acquisition and Disposal and 5.1 Internal Services)
  • Develop and implement initiatives to reduce capability delivery process complexity
    • Defence’s Project Management Competency Development program, an important part of rebuilding a professional project management workforce, continued on schedule. As part of Defence Renewal, Defence established a working group to investigate ways to streamline the project approval process. (see 5.1 Internal Services)
  • Integrate risk and performance management into Defence planning and management processes
    • As a part of Defence Renewal, Defence developed and received TBS approval to implement a revised and more robust Program Alignment Architecture and Performance Measurement Framework. (see 5.1 Internal Services)
  • Continue to strengthen the core Control Framework in support of audited departmental financial statements
    • Defence met or exceeded all milestones in 2013-14 to implement the TBS Policy on Internal Control. (see 5.1 Internal Services)
  • Continue to strengthen the core Control Framework in support of Treasury Board requirements pertaining to procurement, management and control of inventories
    • Defence met its targets with respect to stocktaking and the incorporation of Supply Chain Integration and Material Management into the Enterprise Resource Management environment.  (see 5.1 Internal Services)
  • Develop and implement a Defence Environmental Strategy
  • Implement a Defence Infrastructure Compliance Strategy
  • Develop and implement Defence National Real Property Development Plan
    • Under Defence Renewal, Defence transformed its Real Property business model to reorganize the way it does business and completed the National Real Property Procurement Strategy. (see 5.1 Internal Services)
  • Implement Strategic Review/Implement the Deficit Reduction Action Plan
    • The Defence Team continues to achieve Strategic Review and Deficit Reduction Action Plan targets while meeting Defence operational and corporate commitments. The results achieved under these two government-wide fiscal restraint initiatives are reported by theme in the following supporting document, Strategic Review and Deficit Reduction Action Plan 17
PriorityTypeStrategic Outcomes
Strengthening the Defence Team Previously committed to

This priority contributes to:

1. Resources Are Delivered to Meet Government Defence Expectations
4. Care and Support to Canadian Armed Forces and Contribution to Canadian Society

Summary of Progress

Original plans and links to key accomplishments:

  • Provide enhanced support to the ill and the injured and to the families of CAF members
    • Defence made several advances in the CAF mental health program and developed plans to manage the overall health care system for Regular and Reserve Force members. By the end of the fiscal year, 51 vacant civilian positions had been filled with clinical providers, managerial and/or administrative Public Servants Empoyees for a net growth of 9.3%. (see Program 4.1 Defence Team Personnel Support)
    • All outstanding Board of Inquiry and Summary Investigation files pertaining to Significant Injuries and Death were closed prior to the responsibility for this activity being transfered to Chief Review Services in July 2014.
  • Advance a comprehensive plan to align and optimize the military and civilian workforce
  • Maximize military and civilian potential by continuing to strengthen leadership capacity, succession planning, continuous learning and professional development
  • Implement Public Service Renewal action plan aligned with Clerk’s priorities
    • Defence completed several projects related to technology to support business requirements analysis, identification and options analysis. In June 2013, this focus was reoriented to the Blueprint 2020 initiative. (see 5.1 Internal Services

Risk Analysis

Defence is influenced by a wide range of external and internal factors, both domestic and international, that have an impact on how it carries out its mandate. These factors present both risks and opportunities, which are taken into account as Defence delivers on its roles and responsibilities. By continuously monitoring emerging issues, developments and trends, Defence can anticipate and respond to challenges and the risks associated with them.

For FY 2013‐14, five key Corporate Risks having a Defence‐wide impact were highlighted. To fulfill the Government of Canada's expectations, Defence will continue to manage these Corporate Risks in an effective manner.

The Defence Readiness risk is very important to Defence and Canadians. Unexpected events are by their nature unpredictable in time, place and effect. Defence must be prepared to face them without dramatically affecting ongoing missions and jeopardizing the Government’s domestic and international security related commitments. The directive for CAF Force Posture and Readiness deftly ensures that Defence maintains the appropriate levels of ready capabilities to respond to the forecasted operational requirements as articulated in the Canada First Defence Strategy (CFDS) in the face of the unexpected.

The Defence Team Capacity risk is significant to Defence as the effective management of the risk enables it to fulfil the expectations of the Government of Canada and Canadians. An aging Canadian population and growing competition for skilled talent between public and private sector employers affects Defence’s ability to renew and strengthen the workforce. Defence itself faces high attrition rates due to impending retirement of its personnel. Improving strategic level human resources plans and strengthening leadership capacity, succession planning, continuous learning and professional development will allow Defence to continue to respond effectively to this risk.

The Investment Plan flexibility risk is important to Defence because the changing strategic situation, new developments in technology and the operational art may necessitate or create opportunities to invest in new capabilities. Flexibility is necessary in order to respond to these changes quickly and while still providing value for Canadians when obtaining materiel to support new or improved capabilities. A carefully crafted Investment Plan (IP), Integrated Disposal Framework and a comprehensive analysis process for assessing new projects will allow Defence to improve the inclusion of new or updated capabilities and the retirement of outdated capabilities to ensure long‐term affordability and balance investments across the four pillars of CFDS.

The Capability Delivery Process Complexity risk is significant because the timely and efficient delivery of capabilities to meet the requirements of the CFDS is important to Defence and Canadians. The Project Approval Process Redesign, institutionalization of Project Management Competency Development and Economic Action Plan 2013 goals all improve the efficacious delivery of capabilities to enable operations and provide value for Canadians.

The Secure and Integrated IM/IT risk is crucial to Defence since a secure environment which allows synergistic sharing of information promotes success in operations and efficiency in all other areas of Defence. The refocused IM/IT strategy under the umbrella of Defence Renewal will optimize IT Service Delivery, increase the efficiency of the IM/IT Program by improving application management practices and build on existing efforts to synchronize planning, which will help make IT expenditure more efficient. 

Key Risks
RiskRisk Response StrategyLink to Program Alignment Architecture

Defence Readiness

Defence will continue to enhance its ability to manage CAF posture and Defence resources to respond to unexpected major domestic and/or international event(s) while continuing to support the readiness levels to meet the current and forecasted operational requirements of the Government of Canada as articulated in the Canada First Defence Strategy.

  • To mitigate this risk identified in National Defence’s 2013–14 Report on Plans and Priorities 18 (RPP), the directive issued for future CAF Force Posture and Readiness 19 was updated and implemented to adjust the necessary tasks based on lessons learned and from an updated understanding of possible threats to Canada. This provided a clear and viable plan which developed and maintained the capabilities and readiness levels necessary to meet the requirements of the CFDS within Horizon 1 20. This directive will continue to be reviewed every year.
  • To mitigate this risk beyond Horizon 1, a plan is in place to move forward with the CFDS that takes into consideration the evolving strategic and fiscal context.
  • The Defence Business Management Program, which will provide greater visibility into the linkages between readiness and resource management decisions to facilitate better allocations, was reorganized under the Defence Renewal team and renamed Defence Business Management Capability Transformation. A business application proof of concept was initiated in February 2014.
National Defence is Ready to Meet Government Defence Expectations

Defence Team Capacity

Defence will continue to place priority on achieving the right balance and composition of the Defence workforce with focused attention on addressing military and civilian occupations of concern, and on leadership and professional development at all levels in the organization.

  • To mitigate this risk identified in the
    2013‐14 RPP, Defence is implementing the first phase of a strategic‐level plan to improve the view of the military and civilian workforce to better support proactive planning. As well, Defence continued to strengthen leadership capacity, succession planning, continuous learning and professional development. In particular, Defence completed the CAF succession planning framework, implemented the Directive on Performance Management and advanced Learning Transformation.
  • Defence refocused its efforts from completing the Clerk’s priorities associated with public service renewal and advancing CAF Transformation to align with Blueprint 2020 and Defence Renewal initiatives. Furthermore, additional focus was placed on improving program delivery, in which Defence continued to promote the professional development of its project management workforce.

Resources are Delivered to Meet Government Defence Expectations

Investment Plan Flexibility

Defence will continue to ensure that there is sufficient flexibility in the Investment Plan (IP) to address both emerging operational requirements and CAF capability requirements of the future as outlined in the CFDS.

  • To mitigate this risk identified in the
    2013‐14 RPP, Defence developed an update to the Investment Plan (IP), completed the Integrated Disposal Framework project, commenced implementation of a new comprehensive analysis process for assessing projects proposed for inclusion in the IP and the Defence Business Management Program was reorganized under the Defence Renewal Team and renamed Defence Business Management Capability Transformation in September 2013. A business application proof of concept was initiated in February 2014. These initiatives will allow Defence to improve investment decision‐making and financial planning in order to more effectively manage the changes to the IP, ensure long‐term affordability and balance investments across the four pillars of CFDS and the Department’s priorities.

Resources are Delivered to Meet Government Defence Expectations

Capability Delivery Process Complexity

Defence will continue to improve the tools to handle as well as streamline the development, programme approval and Government of Canada defence procurement processes to enable Defence at meeting investment targets in critical assets (equipment, physical and information infrastructure and real property) in a timely manner to enable CAF operations.

  • To mitigate this risk identified in the
    2013‐14 RPP, Defence launched a new initiative, the Project Approval Process Redesign Project, to further streamline the submission process. Defence implemented policy directives to institutionalize Project Management Competency Development. Qualification of project managers is on target for end of 2014. Defence obtained approval to implement the Defence Procurement Strategy.
  • Defence, together with Public Works and Government Services Canada, Industry Canada and Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada, developed Economic Action Plan 2013 goals to better leverage military procurement and to reform the defence procurement process.
  • The Defence Business Management Program, which will provide for the more efficient management of investment resources, was reorganized under the Defence Renewal team and renamed Defence Business Management Capability Transformation in September 2013. A business application proof of concept was initiated in February 2014.

Resources are Delivered to Meet Government Defence Expectations

Secure and Integrated IM/IT

Defence will prioritize and focus the level of integration and security required to provide a flexible and agile information environment that is conducive to efficient joint CAF operations and executive decision making, while assuring and maintaining the required level of IT security.

  • To mitigate this risk identified in the
    2013‐14 RPP, Defence refocused its IM/IT strategy under the umbrella of Defence Renewal.  Under Defence Renewal, Defence will optimize IT Service Delivery, increase the efficiency of the Defence IM/IT Programme by improving application management practices across the Department and build on existing efforts to synchronize planning in the Department, which will help make IT expenditure more efficient.

Internal Services

 

ACTUAL EXPENDITURES

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

The following table summarizes Defence’s total planned and actual spending for fiscal year 2013-14. 

2013–14
Main Estimates
2013–14
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total Authorities Available for Use
2013–14
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
Difference
(actual minus planned)
17,985,310,381 18,312,567,516 19,696,475,033 18,764,374,206 451,806,690

 Source: Assistant Deputy Minister (Finance and Corporate Services) Group

In FY 2013-14, the Main Estimates were increased through Supplementary Estimates and allotments from Treasury Board by $1,711.1 million to $19,696.4 million. The difference between total authorities and actual spending of $932.1 million consists of:

  • $836.8 million in authorities that will be available to the Department in future years related primarily to:
    • $648.7 million for revised cash flow schedules for major capital equipment and infrastructure projects;
    • $177.7 million in the operating budget carry forward of lapsed funding from FY 2013-14 that will be available to the Department in 2014-15;
    • $6.1 million in proceeds from the disposal of surplus Crown assets which will be returned to the Department in 2014-15; and
    • $4.3 million for implementation of the Federal Court's approved settlement of the Manuge v. Her Majesty the Queen Class Action Lawsuit concerning the Pension Act offset provision contained in the Canadian Forces Service Income Security Insurance Plan - Long Term Disability Policy.
  • $75.2 million related primarily to:
    • $56.6 million for unused Afghanistan funding;
    • $16.7 million from the department's baseline funding for military and civilian member on severance pay savings identified as part of the Budget 2013 Spending Review; and
    • $1.8 million in statutory related to lower Employee Benefit Plan forecasts.
  • $20.1 million in residual lapses related primarily to lower than planned contribution payments.

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents - FTEs)

Due to higher than forecasted attrition and other factors, the Canadian Armed Forces ended FY 2013-14 below its desired end-state for total Regular Force manning of 68,000 +/- 500. Measures are being applied to increase production and limit voluntary attrition in order to re-establish the CAF to its authorized strength as soon as practical.

The Department has been actively reducing its civilian workforce in line with Government-wide spending review initiatives to reduce FTEs.  Greater than anticipated departures were achieved as the Department focused heavily on natural attrition in planning reductions. The Department is now seizing the opportunity of being advanced in their planning in order to realign and rebuild the workforce to address priorities areas. This will allow the Department to effectively address its business priorities while staying within its FTE limits.

For details, see Program 1.2: Recruiting of Personnel and Initial Training.

The following table summarizes Defence’s total planned and actual human resources FTEs 21 for FY 2013-14. 

 PlannedActualDifference (actual minus planned)
Regular Force 68,000 67,139 (861)
Primary Reserve (Class C) 600 412 (188)
Civilian 25,408 23,422 (1,986)
TOTAL 94,008 90,973 (3,035)

 

Sources: Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff Group, Chief Military Personnel Group, and Assistant Deputy Minister (Human Resources - Civilian) Group
Note: In comparison with the 2012-13 Departmental Performance Report (DPR) actual figures, Regular Force FTEs decreased by 547 and civilian FTEs decreased by 1,833.

Human Resources - Reserve Force Personnel

The CAF remained committed to meeting Government of Canada direction to achieve a Primary Reserve strength of 27,000. At the close of FY 2013-14, the annual average Reserve Force paid strength was 22,467 and below the 27,000 target. The Reserve Force paid strength is temporarily below target due in combination to a number of contributing initiatives. Primary Reserve personnel were rebalanced to a more traditional model composed primarily of part-time Reservists, resulting in fewer full-time permanent Reservists. In addition, there was a surge in component transfers of over 900 personnel from the Reserve Force to the Regular Force. Furthermore, impacts from policy changes on full-time employment of Reservists in receipt of a Regular Force pension had a tendency to reduce the number of personnel employed within the Reserve Force.

For details, see Program 1.2: Recruiting of Personnel and Initial Training.

The following table summarizes Defence’s total planned and actual human resources for Reserve Force Personnel for FY 2013-14.

 PlannedActualDifference
(actual minus
planned)
Primary Reserve
Average Paid Strength1
27,000 22,467 (4,533)

Cadet Organizations
Administration and Training Service
Total Strength

8,000 7,823 (177)
Canadian Rangers
Total Strength
5,000 5,042 42

Source: Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff Group

Notes:

  1. The Primary Reserve are those personnel working in various capacities with the Canadian Armed Forces where Class A reservists perform part-time work and training, Class B reservists are employed full-time permanent (year-over-year) or perform incremental full-time employment or training for one or more periods of more than 14 but less than 365 consecutive days within any one year period, and Class C reservists are employed full-time (for operations only) but with the equivalent pay, benefits and liability as a Regular Force member.
  2. The majority of Reservists serve on part-time (Class A) service. There is a significant reduction in Class A numbers during the summer as many personnel are away from their home units conducting training on short-term Class B status. In addition, some Primary Reserve members are inactive. For these reasons, total strength is not an accurate representation of those on duty. The portion of Primary Reserve that is on duty and receives payment is counted and reported as the Primary Reserve average paid strength (an annual monthly average).
  3. Primary Reserve average paid strength reporting, planning and allocations are based on monthly reports provided by Assistant Deputy Minister (Finance and Corporate Services)/Director Strategic Finance Costing and Assistant Deputy Minister (Information Management)/Director Human Resource Information Management (DHRIM).
  4. For details on the Cadets and Canadian Rangers, see Sub-Program 4.2.1: Cadets.
  5. For details on the Canada’s Reserve Force 22, see the supporting document on the Defence web site.

Budgetary Performance Summary for Strategic Outcomes and Programs (dollars) 


Note: To view the Budgetary Performance Summary for Strategic Outcomes and Programs in tabular form, click here

 

The difference between planned and final spending authorities used is summarized as follows:

Explanation of ChangeChange (dollars)
Net adjustments to the spending profile of major capital equipment and infrastructure projects to align financial resources with project acquisition timeliness -979,673,444
Funding related to measures announced by the government in Budget 2013 to make government more efficient and return to a balanced budget -126,666,667
Funding related to implementation of Budget 2013 measures to reduce travel costs through the use of technology -18,843,931
Other miscellaneous departmental requirements -26,141,922
Total decreases -1,151,325,964
Funding authorized to be carried forward between fiscal years 196,080,528
Funding for implementation of the Federal Court's approved settlement of the Manuge v. Her Majesty the Queen Class Action Lawsuit concerning the Pension Act offset provision contained in the Canadian Forces Service Income Security Insurance Plan - Long Term Disability Policy 510,000,000
Funding in statutory primarily related to lower Employee Benefit Plan forecasts 367,385,310
Funding associated with the Canada First Defence Strategy 400,000,000
Other miscellaneous departmental requirements 129,666,816
Total increases 1,603,132,654
Net change 451,806,690


Departmental Spending for FY 2013-14 by Program (dollars)

Departmental Spending for FY 2013-14 by Program

[Text version of the Departmental Spending for FY 2013-14 by Program pie chart]

ALIGNMENT OF SPENDING WITH THE WHOLE-OF-GOVERNMENT FRAMEWORK

Alignment of 2013-14 Actual Spending with the Whole-of-Government Framework 24 (dollars)

 

Strategic Outcome ProgramSpending AreaGovernment of Canada Outcome2013-14
Actual Spending
Resources are Delivered to Meet Government Defence Expectations 1.1 Defence Science and Technology Economic Affairs An innovative and knowledge-based economy 357,676,937
1.2 Recruiting of Personnel and Initial Training International Affairs A safe and secure world through international engagement 1,096,738,160
1.3 Equipment Acquisition and Disposal International Affairs A safe and secure world through international engagement 2,304,406,225
1.4 Real Property Infrastructure Acquisition and Disposal Economic Affairs Strong economic growth 498,506,389
National Defence is Ready to Meet Government Defence Expectations 2.1 Maritime Readiness  International Affairs  A safe and secure world through international engagement  2,164,396,198
2.2 Land Readiness  International Affairs  A safe and secure world through international engagement  3,308,404,817
2.3 Aerospace Readiness  International Affairs  A safe and secure world through international engagement  1,849,063,423
2.4 Joint and Common Readiness  International Affairs  A safe and secure world through international engagement  2,259,462,866
Defence Operations Improve Peace, Stability and Security Wherever Deployed 3.1 Situational Awareness  International Affairs  A safe and secure world through international engagement  380,994,605
3.2 Canadian Peace, Stability and Security  Social Affairs  A safe and secure Canada  333,449,431
3.3 Continental Peace, Stability and Security  International Affairs  A strong and mutually beneficial North American partnership  216,866,379
3.4 International Peace, Stability and Security  International Affairs  A safe and secure world through international engagement  1,049,967,979
Care and Support to the Canadian Armed Forces and Contribution to Canadian Society 4.1 Defence Team Personnel Support  International Affairs  A safe and secure world through international engagement  1,515,175,655
4.2 Canadian Identity  Social Affairs  A vibrant Canadian culture and heritage  348,451,951
4.3 Environmental Protection and Stewardship  Economic Affairs  A clean and healthy environment  107,533,918
4.4 Non-Security Support  Government Affairs  A transparent, accountable and responsive federal government  617,906
Total
(Does not include Internal Services)
17,791,712,839

 

 

Total Spending by Spending Area (dollars)
Spending AreaTotal Planned SpendingTotal Actual Spending
Economic Affairs 921,596,345 963,717,244
Social Affairs 627,507,810 681,901,382
International Affairs 15,844,791,696 16,145,476,307
Government Affairs 2,310,116 617,906
Total
(Does not include Internal Services)
17,396,205,966 17,791,712,839


DEPARTMENTAL SPENDING TREND

Departmental Spending Trend Graph

[Text version of the Departmental Spending Trend graph]

Source: Assistant Deputy Minister (Finance and Corporate Services) Group

Notes:

  1. Total spending for 2011-12, 2012-13 and 2013-14 represent the final spending on a cash basis, as provided by Public Accounts.
  2. Planned spending for 2014-15, 2015-16 and 2016-17, as provided in the 2014-15 Report on Plans and Priorities.
  3. Spending includes Internal Services.

Planned spending in 2014-15 is lower than actual spending in 2013-14. Major factors contributing to the net change include:

  • A decrease in requirements to support Canada’s international security operations in Afghanistan; and
  • A decrease in funding related to measures announced by the government in Budget 2012 and Budget 2013 to make government more efficient and return to a balanced budget.

Planned spending in 2015-16 is higher than 2014-15 and 2016-17. The major factor contributing to the net increase is the adjustments to spending on major capital equipment and infrastructure projects to align financial resources with current project acquisition timelines.

ESTIMATES BY VOTE

For information on Defence’s organizational Votes and statutory expenditures, consult the Public Accounts of Canada 2014 25 on the Public Works and Government Services Canada website.