Department of National Defence - Reports on Plans and Priorities 2013-14

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MINISTER'S MESSAGE

The Honourable Peter MacKay, P.C., M.P. - Minister of National Defence

It is my pleasure to report to Parliament and Canadians on the plans and priorities of the Department of National Defence (DND) and the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) Footnote 1 for 2013-14.

Protecting Canada and Canadians is the top priority for Defence, while working hard to support Canada's interests and values around the world, including contributing to international peace and security operations. In 2013-14, we will continue to make the renewal and transformative adjustments necessary to position the Defence Team to successfully meet future responsibilities and to do our part in exercising the most prudent financial stewardship of Canadians' tax dollars.

After six years of unprecedented growth, Canadians expect Government organizations be vigilant with their money and National Defence is no exception. Defence is undertaking a number of ongoing initiatives to make the Department more efficient and effective in delivering a combat-effective, multi-role forces.

As part of this renewal effort, the Canadian Joint Operations Command (CJOC) was stood up in 2012 to streamline operations, create efficiencies and eliminate redundancy. In 2013-14, the CJOC will continue to ensure effective command, support and conduct of operations at home, with continental partners and around the world as we continue to make the necessary organizational changes to prepare the CAF for the next decade.

The CAF will continue to be an agile, ready and combat-effective force, prepared to deal with new and evolving threats to Canadian security. At home, we stand ready to provide life-saving search and rescue when Canadians are in distress and to assist first responders when natural or man-made disasters strike. The CAF will continue to play a key role in ensuring Canada's Arctic sovereignty, conducting missions and exercises in the region, such as Operation NANOOK. On the greater continent, National Defence will maintain and strengthen the collaboration we have with our closest ally, the United States, in the defence of North America. Our two great nations will continue to work together through the North American Aerospace Defence Command (NORAD), to conduct exercises and training to enhance military interoperability, and make use of existing and emerging fora to explore new areas for cooperation.

Defence will continue to project leadership abroad. Canadians are cognizant and proud of the CAF's achievements and sacrifices in Afghanistan over the past decade. In 2013-14, the CAF will finish the important task of training the Afghan National Security Forces to assume responsibility for their own security. The CAF have spent twelve challenging years in Afghanistan and paid the ultimate price with the loss of Canadian lives. As we end our engagement in the country in 2014, we still mourn the loss of these brave individuals and know that their sacrifices have not been in vain. As we look forward after the end of this important mission, the CAF will ensure an appropriate level of readiness to deploy elsewhere in the world and conduct a range of operations if called upon by the Government of Canada. Whether these missions are in support of a close ally or a multilateral organization such as the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) or the United Nations (UN), or in response to a humanitarian disaster, the CAF will be ready to support and sustain multiple missions at once, if necessary, as outlined in the Canada First Defence Strategy (CFDS).

Defence will continue to deliver on its CFDS commitments in line with Government priorities to modernize and upgrade its equipment capabilities to position our Canadian soldiers, sailors and airmen and women for success and generate economic opportunities nation-wide. Specific priorities for the coming years include the acquisition of Fixed Wing Search and Rescue (FSWAR) aircraft and the continued roll-out of the National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy which will revitalize Canada's naval fleet.

We must never forget that in everything we do, people are the most important resource and sustaining element. Defence will continue to support military families, the ill and injured, and the families of the fallen, as a paramount moral obligation. In particular, Defence has made a recurring annual investment of $11.4 million in mental health services.

Balancing all of these priorities is a challenging task. It takes a dedicated Defence Team. Our ability to deliver successfully on multiple objectives depends on highly skilled civilian and military employees. Defence will continue to maintain a strong and vibrant workforce that contributes to operational excellence. I know that this integrated team will continue to work diligently to make Defence a success.

I never cease to be impressed by the professionalism of National Defence personnel. It is my honour and privilege to lead the Department. I look forward to working with my colleagues in Parliament and fellow Canadians in the year ahead to further strengthen this great national institution.

Original signed by:

The Honourable Peter MacKay, P.C., M.P.
Minister of National Defence

SECTION I: ORGANIZATIONAL OVERVIEW

Raison d'être

On behalf of the people of Canada, the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) and the Department of National Defence (DND) stand ready to perform three key roles:

  • Defend Canada – by delivering excellence at home;
  • Defend North America – by being a strong and reliable partner with the United States in the defence of the continent; and
  • Contribute to International Peace and Security – by projecting leadership abroad.

Responsibilities

The Defence Team is committed to achieving success in a variety of priority areas over the course of 2013-14 and beyond. The focus of Defence activities over the 2013-14 reporting period, as highlighted in this report, is as follows:

  • Conducting training operations in Afghanistan and preparing the Afghan National Security Forces to take over full control for the country's security in 2014;
  • Continuing to deliver on our Defence Priorities while supporting the Government of Canada's domestic and global priorities; and
  • Carrying out the defence mission while ensuring sound financial management of the Defence budget and stewardship of public resources.

To accomplish this, Defence must remain flexible and prepared, capable of sustaining a world-class force which is able to protect Canadians at home; continue to be a strong and dependable partner on the continent; and make a meaningful contribution to security internationally.

Within this era of fiscal restraint, the global security environment continues to change and evolve, and Defence will adapt with it. Although today's security challenges are many and varied, the Canadian Armed Forces are ready to tackle them. The Defence Team will continue to work tirelessly to enhance and sustain peace and security, deliver on its CFDS commitments, and support its soldiers and their families.

Canada First Defence Strategy

To guide Defence in carrying out its roles and responsibilities, the Canada First Defence StrategyFootnote 2 (CFDS), released in May 2008, outlines what is required to develop and maintain a first-class, modern military that is well-trained, well-equipped and ready to take on the challenges of the 21st century.

To accomplish this, the CFDS provides a 20-year roadmap, which is periodically reviewed, to modernize the CAF with stable and predictable funding that permits long-term planning and investment in four Defence capability areas or pillars:

3 Roles


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  • Personnel: In accordance with Budget 2012, the CAF Regular and Reserve Force Strength will be maintained at 68,000 and 27,000 over the medium term, respectively to preserve the balance across the four pillars of CFDS;
  • Equipment: Renew the CAF's core equipment platforms;
  • Readiness: Ensure the appropriate level of personnel training and equipment availability; and
  • Infrastructure: Replace or refurbish approximately 25 per cent of DND infrastructure holdings within 10 years, with approximately 50 per cent being replaced or refurbished over 20 years to meet Canada's future defence and security requirements.



The CFDS articulates the broad strategic vision for Defence, aligned with the level of ambition identified by the Government of Canada and outlines six core CAF missions in domestic, continental and international contexts:

  • Conduct daily domestic and continental operations, including in the Arctic and through the North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD);
  • Support a major international event in Canada such as the G8, G20 and North American Leaders' Summits;
  • Respond to a major terrorist attack;
  • Support civilian authorities during a crisis in Canada such as a natural disaster;
  • Lead and/or conduct a major international operation for an extended period; and
  • Deploy forces in response to crises elsewhere in the world for shorter periods.

Strategic Outcomes and Program Alignment Architecture (PAA)

The Government of Canada's Management, Resources and Results StructureFootnote 3 (MRRS) is the foundation of a government-wide approach aimed at strengthening the management and accountability of public expenditures and clearly demonstrating results for Canadians. The Program Alignment Architecture (PAA) is part of the MRRS. Defence's PAA shows how its Programs align with the Department's four strategic outcomes. Internal Services is a stand alone Program which defines activities and resources that support the organization's program needs and corporate obligations.

During the coming year, in concert with Treasury Board, the Department will redesign the Defence PAA incorporating a more functional view that expresses the integrated means by which our outputs and outcomes are achieved, thus better reflecting the business of Defence. Combined with the Defence Business Model, the redesigned PAA will facilitate business process renewal initiatives and Enterprise Architecture development within Defence.

PAA Legend

  • Strategic Outcome
    • Program
      • Sub-program
        • Sub-sub-program

PAA

  • 1. Resources are delivered to meet Government Defence Expectations
    • 1.1 Defence Science & Technology
      • 1.1.1 Research, Technology and Analysis
      • 1.1.2 Public Security Science & Technology
    • 1.2 Recruiting, and Initial Training of Personnel
      • 1.2.1 Recruitment
        • 1.2.1.1 Regular Recruitment
        • 1.2.1.2 Reserve Recruitment
        • 1.2.1.3 Civilian Recruitment
      • 1.2.2 Training to Initial Occupation Level
        • 1.2.2.1 Basic Individual Military Qualifications Training
        • 1.2.2.2 Initial Individual Occupation Training
        • 1.2.2.3 Initial Individual (Primary) Reserve Training
    • 1.3 Equipment Acquisition and Disposal
      • 1.3.1 Maritime Equipment Acquisition and Disposal
      • 1.3.2 Land Equipment Acquisition and Disposal
      • 1.3.3 Aerospace Equipment Acquisition and Disposal
      • 1.3.4 Joint and Common Support Equipment Acquisition and Disposal
      • 1.3.5 Joint and Common Command and Control Acquisition and Disposal
    • 1.4 Real Property Infrastructure Acquisition and Disposal
      • 1.4.1 Real Property Acquisition and Disposal
        • 1.4.1.1 Maritime Real Property Acquisition and Disposal
        • 1.4.1.2 Land Real Property Acquisition and Disposal
        • 1.4.1.3 Aerospace Real Property Acquisition and Disposal
        • 1.4.1.4 Joint Real Property Acquisition and Disposal
  • 2. National Defence is Ready to meet Government Defence Expectations
    • 2.1 Maritime Readiness
      • 2.1.1 Contingency Task Group
      • 2.1.2 National Task Group
      • 2.1.3 Single ship International Deployment
      • 2.1.4 Domestic Maritime Readiness
      • 2.1.5 Sustain Maritime Forces
        • 2.1.5.1 Maritime Training
        • 2.1.5.2 Maritime Infrastructure and Base Support
        • 2.1.5.3 Maritime Equipment Maintenance
        • 2.1.5.4 Maritime Command and Control
    • 2.2 Land Readiness
      • 2.2.1 Primary International Commitment
      • 2.2.2 Secondary International Commitment
      • 2.2.3 Domestic and Standing Government of Canada Tasks
      • 2.2.4 Sustain Land Forces
        • 2.2.4.1 Land Training
        • 2.2.4.2 Land Infrastructure and Base Support
        • 2.2.4.3 Land Equipment Maintenance
        • 2.2.4.4 Land Command and Control
    • 2.3 Aerospace Readiness
      • 2.3.1 Aerospace Force Application
      • 2.3.2 Air Mobility
      • 2.3.3 Tactical Helicopter
      • 2.3.4 Aerospace Intelligence, Surveillance, Reconnaissance and Control
      • 2.3.5 Air Expeditionary Support
      • 2.3.6 Sustain Aerospace Forces
        • 2.3.6.1 Aerospace Training
        • 2.3.6.2 Aerospace Infrastructure and Wing Support
        • 2.3.6.3 Aerospace Equipment Maintenance
        • 2.3.6.4 Aerospace Command and Control
    • 2.4 Joint and Common Readiness
      • 2.4.1 Joint Operations Readiness
        • 2.4.1.1 Special Ops Readiness
        • 2.4.1.2 Disaster and Special Assistance Readiness
        • 2.4.1.3 Joint Command and Control Readiness
      • 2.4.2 Common Defence Support
        • 2.4.2 1 Common Training
        • 2.4.2.2 Common Infrastructure Maintenance and Base Support
        • 2.4.2.3 Common Supply and Maintenance Support
        • 2.4.2.4 General Support, Joint and Theatre Support Units
        • 2.4.2.5 Interoperability Training in Support of Continental Operations
        • 2.4.2.6 Military Health Care
  • 3. Defence operations improve Peace, Stability and Security wherever deployed
    • 3.1 Situational Awareness
      • 3.1.1 Conduct Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance
      • 3.1.2 Support to Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance
    • 3.2 Canadian Peace Stability and Security
      • 3.2.1 Canadian Sovereignty Operations
      • 3.2.2 Canadian Disaster Relief and Humanitarian Assistance Operations
      • 3.2.3 Canadian Peace Stability and Security Operations
      • 3.2.4 Search and Rescue
    • 3.3 Continental Peace, Stability and Security
      • 3.3.1 Continental Contingency Operations
      • 3.3.2 North American Aerospace Defence Command
    • 3.4 International Peace Stability and Security
      • 3.4.1 Coalition Operations
      • 3.4.2 Military Diplomacy
      • 3.4.3 International Disaster Relief and Humanitarian Response Operations
  • 4. Care and Support to the Canadian Forces and Contribution to Canadian Society
    • 4.1 Defence Team Personnel Support
      • 4.1.1 Military Personnel Support Services
        • 4.1.1.1 Common Professional Development
        • 4.1.1.2 Military Housing
        • 4.1.1.3 Career Management and Relocation
        • 4.1.1.4 Military Family and Casualty Support
        • 4.1.1.5 Individual Well Being and Work Environment
        • 4.1.1.6 Honour and Recognition
      • 4.1.2 Learning and Career Centres
    • 4.2 Canadian Identity
      • 4.2.1 Cadets
      • 4.2.2 History, Protocol and Heritage Ceremonial Activities
    • 4.3 Environmental Protection and Stewardship
      • 4.3.1 Environment
      • 4.3.2 Unexploded Ordnance
    • 4.4 Non-Security Support
      • 4.4.1 Support to Federal Government
      • 4.4.2 Support to Other Organizations
  • 5.1 Internal Services
    • 5.1.1 Governance and Management Support
      • 5.1.1.1 Management and Oversight Services
      • 5.1.1.2 CAF Readiness Management and Oversight
      • 5.1.1.3 Communications Services
      • 5.1.1.4 Legal Services
    • 5.1.2 Resource Management Services
      • 5.1.2.1 Human Resource Management Services
      • 5.1.2.2 Financial Management Services
      • 5.1.2.3 Information Management Services
      • 5.1.2.4 Information Technology Services
      • 5.1.2.5 Travel and Other Administrative
    • 5.1.3 Asset Management Services
      • 5.1.3.1 Real Property Services
      • 5.1.3.2 Materiel Services

For descriptions of Defence Strategic Outcomes and associated Programs, please refer to Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome.

Risk Analysis

Security is influenced by a wide range of factors, domestic and international, that impact on how Defence carries out its mandate. These factors present Defence with both risks and opportunities, which are taken into account as DND/CAF deliver on their roles and responsibilities. By continuously monitoring emerging issues, developments and trends, Defence can anticipate and respond to challenges and the risks associated with them.

The Defence Corporate Risk Profile (CRP) documents the risks facing Defence, and is an important influence on planning and resource allocation decisions. It is a tool through which the executive leadership can provide guidance and direction in responding to the Corporate Risks assessed as vital to the achievement of the Defence mission.

The CRP is derived from the review of external and internal risks. For FY 2013-14, five key Corporate Risks having a Defence-wide impact are highlighted. The key Corporate Risks, as well as their attendant mitigation actions, are presented below. To fulfill the Government of Canada's expectations, Defence will continue to manage these Corporate Risks in an effective manner.

Key Corporate Risks
RiskAction
Defence Readiness Defence will continue to enhance its ability to manage CAF posture and Defence resources to respond to unexpected major domestic and/or international event(s) while continuing to support the readiness levels to meet the current and forecasted operational requirements of the Government of Canada as articulated in the Canada First Defence Strategy (CFDS).

Risk response:
  • The CDS Directive - CF Force Posture and ReadinessFootnote 4 provides a clear and viable plan to develop and maintain the capabilities and readiness levels necessary to meet the requirements of the CFDS within Horizon 1Footnote 5 .
  • Defence will implement Horizon 1 of the directive, ensuring resources are aligned and available to support determined readiness levels and posture military capability in order to meet planned and anticipated requirements of the Government of Canada as articulated in the CFDS.
  • Defence will assess implications of evolving strategic and fiscal context for CFDS implementation in order to develop future capabilities necessary to meet government expectations.
  • Defence will develop and implement a Defence Business Management Capability in order to prioritize, align and integrate policies, processes, resources and systems.
Defence Team Capacity Defence will continue to place priority on achieving the right balance and composition of the Defence workforce with focused attention on addressing military and civilian occupations of concern, and on leadership and professional development at all levels in the organization.

Risk response:
  • Defence will conduct periodic operating and administrative reviews of the business practices and capability requirements to identify opportunities for efficiencies and divestments such as the government-wide spending reviews.
  • The CAF Transformation will create efficiencies, increase effectiveness and ensure affordability, deliver on CFDS commitments, institutionalize lessons learned and associated capabilities and deliver on future recapitalization and transformation.
  • Defence will provide enhanced support to the ill and the injured and to the families of CAF members in order to integrate and coordinate services available through the military health care system, the military administrative and social support system, and the transition and veteran support system managed by Veterans Affairs Canada (VAC).
  • Defence will align and optimize the military and civilian workforce to ensure that the right personnel, with the right qualifications, are in the right place at the right time.
  • Defence will maximize military and civilian potential by continuing to strengthen leadership capacity, succession planning, continuous learning and professional development, thereby creating and maintaining a workforce that has the tools, knowledge, developmental plans and learning opportunities essential to a fully-integrated, flexible, multi-role combat-capable Defence Team.
Investment Plan Flexibility Defence will continue to ensure that there is sufficient flexibility in the Investment Plan (IP) to address both emerging operational requirements and CF capability requirements of the future as outlined in the CFDS.

Risk response:
  • Defence will conduct periodic operating and administrative reviews of the business practices and capability requirements to identify opportunities for efficiencies and divestments such as the government-wide spending reviews.
  • Defence will develop and implement a Defence Business Management Capability in order to prioritize, align and integrate policies, processes, resources and systems.
  • Improve management of the IP to balance CFDS requirements so as to maintain an affordable and sustainable IP that delivers on the CFDS commitments in light of the potential for cost increases and funding requirements for new and expanded capabilities.
  • Disposal plans to address pressures on future sustainment costs and the diverting of capital funding from the IP envelope to maintaining ageing weapons platforms.
Capability Delivery Process Complexity Defence will continue to improve the tools to handle as well as streamline the development, programme approval and Government of Canada defence procurement processes to enable Defence at meeting investment targets in critical assets (equipment, physical and information infrastructure and real property) in a timely manner to enable CAF operations.

Risk response:
  • Defence will regulate and streamline the Project Approval process in order to ensure that investment targets in critical physical assets are met.
  • Defence will maintain and manage Business Continuity and Transition during the implementation of the Administrative Services Review in order to minimize disruption.
  • Defence will improve the procurement framework, processes and training in order to ensure timely delivery of capital assets to meet the CFDS objectives and maximize the broader economic agenda of the Government via Strengthening Government – Industry Relationships, Technology Management, Procurement Management and Policy Enablers.
  • Defence will reduce capability delivery process complexity and thereby meet investment targets in critical assets (equipment, physical and information infrastructure and real property) in a timely manner to enable CAF operations.
  • Defence will develop and implement a Defence Business Management capability in order to prioritize, align and integrate policies, processes, resources and systems.
Secure and Integrated IM/IT Defence will prioritize and focus the level of integration and security required to provide a flexible and agile information environment that is conducive to efficient joint CAF operations and executive decision making, while assuring and maintaining the required level of IT security.

Risk response:
  • Defence will deliver the Materiel Acquisition and Support Information System/Defence Resource Management Information System on time, on budget and within scope in order to provide a flexible and agile information environment materiel and resource data environment.
  • Defence will retire legacy systems as new capabilities are delivered in order to reduce exposure to limitations and vulnerabilities inherent in older systems.
  • Defence will develop and implement initiatives to provide an integrated, secure and effective IM and IT environment in support of all Defence operations, which ensures an integrated, secure flexible and agile information environment that is conducive to efficient operations and decision making.
  • Defence will implement the Administrative Services Review in order to maximize returns on the government wide initiative to maximize efficiencies in the delivery of common Government services to departments.

Organizational Priorities

Defence Priorities express the key areas of focus for Defence to accomplish its mission to "defend Canada and Canadian interests and values while contributing to international peace and security". The Defence Priorities provide emphasis for senior management to direct resources to key initiatives required to address gaps in achieving the PAA expected results, mitigation of the key Corporate Risks and responding to specific Government direction. The four Defence Priorities for 2013-17 that form a foundation for the Department's Report on Plans and Priorities (RPP) are:

  • Ensuring Sustainable Operational Excellence both at Home and Abroad for the Defence of Canada and the Protection of Canadians;
  • Maintaining Required CAF Force Posture and Defence Readiness;
  • Ensuring Defence Affordability; and
  • Strengthening the Defence Team
PriorityTypeFootnote 6Strategic Outcomes
Ensuring Sustainable Operational Excellence both at Home and Abroad for the Defence of Canada and the Protection of Canadians Previously committed to This priority contributes to:
3. Defence Operations Improve Peace, Stability and Security
4. Care and Support to CAF and Contribution to Canadian Society
Description
By Ensuring Sustainable Operational Excellence both at Home and Abroad for the Defence of Canada and the Protection of Canadians, the CAF will maintain its ability to deliver the Canada First Defence Strategy (CFDS) by conducting Six Core Missions within Canada, in North America and globally, potentially all at the same time.

Why is this a priority?

The following are the various priority elements common to this priority theme along with their respective plans in 2013-14. Further details are provided in Section II under the supported Strategic Outcomes.

Priority Element: Exercising Canadian Arctic sovereignty is a priority of the Government of Canada, as articulated in Canada's Northern Strategy, the Arctic Foreign Policy and CFDS.

Plan: Exercise Arctic Sovereignty (See Program 3.2 Canadian Peace, Stability and Security)

Priority Element: The Government considers the Afghanistan training mission a legacy role to Defence.

Plan: Maintain training momentum of the Canadian Contribution Training Mission – Afghanistan (CCTM-A) (See Program 3.4 International Peace, Stability and Security)

Priority Element: Defence requires an integrated and secure flexible and agile information environment that is conducive to efficient operations and decision making.

Plan: Develop and implement initiatives to provide an integrated, secure and effective Information Management (IM) and Information Technology (IT) environment in support of all Defence operations (See Program 5.1 Internal Services)

Priority Element: Policy on Government SecurityFootnote 7 (PGS) directs all departments and agencies to ensure that security management is an identifiable and integral element of departmental governance, programs and services. This includes a systematic and consistent approach in place to support the planning, operation and monitoring of security activities, and essential controls are in place to support interoperability and information exchange.

Plan: Develop and implement initiatives to integrate security management into departmental operations (See Program 5.1 Internal Services)

Priority Element: In the coming years, there are a number of significant historical anniversaries that will be celebrated which are part of the foundation of Canadian identity. These will bring about several important opportunities to engage the public and deepen their understanding of the many contributions the Canadian Army (CA), Royal Canadian Navy (RCN,) Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) and Defence have made to the development of the nation throughout its history.

Plan: Support Government efforts for commemoration of important anniversaries (see Program 4.2 Canadian Identity

PriorityTypeStrategic Outcomes
Maintaining Required CAF Force Posture and Defence Readiness Previously committed toFootnote 8 This priority contributes to all four Strategic Outcomes
Description
By reconstituting and aligning the CAF and DND, Defence will maintain its ability to deliver the CFDS by conducting Six Core Missions within Canada, in North America and globally, at times simultaneously.

Why is this a priority?

The following are the various priority elements common to this priority theme along with their respective plans in 2013-14. Further details are provided in Section II under the supported Strategic Outcomes.

Priority Element: The CAF must ensure resources are aligned and available to support determined readiness levels and therefore able to posture military capability to meet planned and anticipated requirements of the Government of Canada as articulated in the CFDS.

Plan: Implement CDS Direction for CAF Force Posture and Defence Readiness in Horizon 1 (See Programs 2.1 Maritime Readiness; 2.2 Land Readiness; 2.3 Aerospace Readiness; and 2.4 Joint and Common Readiness)

Priority Element: The Defence team must transform, grow and modernize guided by four strategic, interrelated lines of operation:

  • Create efficiencies/increase effectiveness and ensure affordability;
  • Deliver on CFDS commitments;
  • Institutionalize lessons learned and associated capabilities; and
  • Deliver on future recapitalization and transformation.

Plan: Advance CAF Transformation (See Program 5.1 Internal Services)

Priority Element: Defence needs to periodically review what challenges and missions it is required to perform in the future, then plan and develop the capabilities in order to meet government expectations.

Plan: Assess implications of evolving strategic and fiscal context for CFDS implementation (See Program 5.1 Internal Services)

PriorityTypeStrategic Outcomes
Ensuring Defence Affordability Previously committed to This priority contributes to:
1. Resources are Delivered to Meet Government Defence Expectations
4. Care and Support to CAF and Contribution to Canadian Society
Description
By ensuring Defence affordability, the Defence Team will strengthen key military capabilities through management of investments in each of the four pillars of CFDS – Personnel, Equipment, Readiness and Infrastructure.

Why is this a priority?

The following are the various priority elements common to this priority theme along with their respective plans in 2013-14. Further details are provided in Section II under the supported Strategic Outcomes.

Priority Element: Defence must maintain an affordable and sustainable Investment Plan that delivers on the CFDS commitments while also accounting for the potential for cost increases and funding requirements for new and expanded capabilities.

Plan: Improve management of the Investment Plan to balance CFDS requirements (See Program 5.1 Internal Services)

Priority Element: The Government has introduced a new expenditure management system to better manage Government spending.

Plan: Implement Strategic Review (See all Programs in Section II)

Priority Element: Defence requires a corporate governance and business framework to deliver sustainable business management efficiencies, effectiveness and accountability in order to maintain public confidence and trust.

Plan: Develop and implement a Defence business management capability (See Program 5.1 Internal Services)

Priority Element: The Government has introduced a new expenditure management system to reduce Government spending.

Plan: Implement the Deficit Reduction Action Plan (See all Programs in Section II)

Priority Element: The Government has introduced a new organization to maximize efficiencies in the delivery of common Government services to Departments.

Plan: Implement the Administrative Services Review (See Program 5.1 Internal Services)

Priority Element: Defence must improve its capacity for timely delivery of capital assets to meet the CFDS objectives and maximize the broader economic agenda of the Government.

Plan: Improve Defence procurement (See Program 1.3 Equipment Acquisition and Disposal)

Priority Element: In order for Defence to meet investment targets in critical physical assets (equipment, physical and information infrastructure and real property) in a timely manner to enable CAF operations, it must effectively manage the complexity of development, approval and Government of Canada defence procurement processes for full life cycle of assets.

Plan: Develop and implement initiatives to reduce capability delivery process complexity (See Program 1.3 Equipment Acquisition and Disposal)

Priority Element: The integration of risk and performance management into the Departmental Planning and Management (DP&M) processes is essential to supporting decision-making and promoting accountability at all levels of the Defence organization.

Plan: Integrate risk and performance management into Defence planning and management processes (See Program 5.1 Internal Services)

Priority Element: Defence must ensure compliance with the Treasury Board Policy on Internal ControlFootnote 9 (PIC), which took effect on 1 April 2009.

Plan: Continue to strengthen the core Control Framework in support of audited departmental financial statements (See Program 5.1 Internal Services)

Priority Element: Defence must be able to demonstrate compliance with Government regulations and Treasury Board mandatory reporting requirements pertaining to procurement, management and control of inventories.

Plan: Continue to strengthen the core Control Framework in support of Treasury Board requirements pertaining to procurement, management and control of inventories (See Program 5.1 Internal Services)

Priority Element: The ongoing requirement of integrating environmental considerations into the wide breadth of activities undertaken within Defence in support of the four pillars upon which Canada's military capabilities are built: personnel, equipment, infrastructure and readiness.

Plan: Develop and implement a Defence Environmental Strategy (See Program 4.3 Environmental Protection and Stewardship)

Priority Element: Defence must demonstrate compliance with architectural, fire protection, engineering, environmental and related legislation, regulations and standards including an overall risk-based compliance and monitoring framework.

Plan: Implement a Defence infrastructure compliance strategy (See Program 4.3 Environmental Protection and Stewardship)

PriorityTypeStrategic Outcomes
Strengthening the Defence Team Previously committed to This priority contributes to:
1. Resources Are Delivered to Meet Government Defence Expectations
4. Care and Support to CAF and Contribution to Canadian Society
Description
By investing in the Personnel pillar of CFDS – military and civilian – National Defence will align the Defence Team to ensure successful execution of the Six Core Missions within Canada, in North America and globally, at times simultaneously.

Why is this a priority?

The following are the various priority elements common to this priority theme along with their respective plans in 2013-14. Further details are provided in Section II under the supported Strategic Outcomes.

Priority Element: The Government of Canada has a moral commitment to military personnel in recognition of the sacrifices they make and the services they render. The duty and responsibility to care for our current and former members and their families reside especially with the leadership of the CAF, DND and Veteran Affairs Canada.

Plan: Provide enhanced support to the ill and the injured and to the families of CAF members (See Program 4.1 Defence Team Personnel Support)

Priority Element: The CFDS is committed to ensuring a first-class, modern military that is well-trained, well-equipped and ready to take on the challenges of the 21st century. The personnel pillar of the CFDS is a critical component in enabling the CAF to deliver excellence at home and be a strong and reliable defence partner in North America and a valuable contributor to overseas operations.

Plan: Advance a comprehensive plan to align and optimize the military and civilian workforce (see Program 1.2 Recruiting of Personnel and Initial Training)

Priority Element: Defence requires an adaptive, agile and responsive personnel management system that meets personnel capability requirements and provides progressive professional development and competency-based employment to meet organizational needs.

Plan: Maximize military and civilian potential by continuing to strengthen leadership capacity, succession planning, continuous learning and professional development (see Program 1.2 Recruiting of Personnel and Initial Training; 4.1 Defence Team Personnel Support)

Priority Element: Public Service (PS) Renewal is an overarching PS strategy to provide excellent advice and service to Government and Canadians.

Plan: Implement PS Renewal action plan aligned with Clerk's priorities (See Program 5.1 Internal Services)

Source: Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff Group

Planning Summary

Readiness to Respond

In 2013-14, the CAF will maintain the flexibility and preparedness required to deploy in response to Government direction. On any given day, the CAF are ready to defend Canada and North America, to assist law enforcement authorities, to conduct search and rescue efforts, and to save the lives of those lost or injured due to natural disasters. In addition, the CAF is ready to meet the complexity of evolving international challenges, to contribute to international peace and stability, and to deploy military forces to support partners and allies around the world. Defence remains committed to ensuring that a sufficient number of personnel are trained to required levels and that the necessary equipment is available, for both the training and operations needed to take on current and future challenges.

As articulated in the CFDS, readiness refers to the CAF's flexibility and preparedness to deploy in response to Government direction. Readiness is the main output of DND/CAF and accounts for over $9.3 billion in direct spending this year.

The CF Force Posture and Readiness Directive 2012 issued by the CDS provides the overarching framework to ensure that the CAF are fully equipped and prepared to meet all of the assigned CFDS missions. Currently, all three services of the CAF stand operationally ready the meet their assigned CFDS tasks and missions and have declared such.

Readiness also encompasses the resources needed to maintain equipment, conduct training, and prepare units for operations.

Prior to CFDS, the resources allocated for the National Procurement budget, a main component of readiness, which covers ammunition, spare parts and maintenance, covered only 70 percent of demand, significantly impeding the CAF's ability to train and maintain high readiness levels. Today, the Department's Investment Plan funds National Procurement to the full expected demand over the 20 year life of the Investment Plan.

National Procurement Expenditure

As can be seen in the graph below, National Procurement funding will continue to increase from 2006-07 levels to meet the readiness requirements of today's CAF.


[D]

Source: Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff Group

There will be efficiencies achieved in training, as we return to a normal operational tempo following the drawdown from the combat mission in Afghanistan, but the output will not change. Examples of efficiencies and targeted investments in readiness are:

  • Canadian Army: Savings will be achieved through changing the frequency that ready forces are produced by adopting a one year training cycle for high readiness units. Without the imperative of replacing forces in an active theatre, training cycles can be lengthened and significant savings achieved;
  • Royal Canadian Navy: The RCN is currently in the process of implementing a $2.988 billion modernization project of the Halifax Class Frigates which will provide the RCN with a world class operational surface ship capability until the end of the next decade. While undergoing this modernization the number of ships in training is reduced making efficiencies for this next year; and
  • Royal Canadian Air Force: The RCAF readiness will be maintained and savings achieved through increased training efficiencies, exploiting concurrent training opportunities, and leveraging use of the synthetic environment. Furthermore, due to increased training efficiencies resulting from parallel initiatives by the other services, the yearly flying rate will be reduced.

The CAF stands ready to meet the missions assigned in CFDS.

Continued Excellence in Operations

In line with the CFDS, in 2013-14 the CAF will maintain the capability to conduct a range of missions at home and abroad, in collaboration with whole-of-government and international partners. The CAF will continue to ensure the safety and security of Canadians at home, lending a hand to civil authorities when called upon and assisting in emergency situations. Search and Rescue (SAR) coordinators and crews work with federal, provincial and municipal partners to respond as quickly as possible to save the lives of those at risk whenever and wherever an incident occurs.

Canada is a vast nation with a large expanse of territory in the North. Defence has a significant role to play in supporting other government departments in the North, exercising Canada's sovereignty, and providing assistance to Canadians. The Government of Canada is therefore enhancing the CAF's capabilities in the North through several new investments which will help ensure that the Defence Team has the capabilities necessary to provide support for future safety and security challenges in the Arctic.

Abroad, the CAF continues to make a significant contribution to security in Afghanistan through the NATO training mission. The Afghan National Security Forces (ANSF) continues to expand and increasingly train and operate independently of NATO forces, demonstrating its growing capability and capacity to be fully responsible for Afghanistan's own security. In 2013-14, Canada will continue to work with the ANSF, but will see its role in the country once again transition as Afghan forces take full control. Canada's mission in Afghanistan will end in 2014 after twelve years.

Resource Stewardship

Defence remains committed to providing combat-effective, multi-purpose forces at home and abroad, while managing its resources as efficiently as possible. Just as Canadians have tightened their belts with regard to spending in the face of the global economic downturn, so too must Defence continue to make the best use of tax dollars. There are a number of government-wide fiscal restraint initiatives currently being implemented in the Defence Team, including the 2010 Strategic Review and the Budget 2012 Spending Review. These initiatives are aimed at improving the efficiency and effectiveness of the Government, and returning to a balanced budget in the medium term. Defence takes its role as a steward of public resources very seriously and makes every effort to ensure sound financial management of taxpayer dollars.

Renewal and Transformation

To deal with new fiscal realities, Defence is carrying out a number of change initiatives designed to support the federal government's commitment to achieving a balanced budget, and continuing to provide combat-effective, multi-purpose forces at home and abroad to protect Canada and Canadians. A noteworthy development supporting the implementation of budget reductions was the creation of the Defence Renewal Team (DRT) in 2012. This team, consisting of dedicated military and civilian personnel, has a three-year mandate with the important task of helping to move the organization forward through change. Using a coordinated Defence Team-wide approach, they will lead, oversee, and support key activities relating to spending reductions and process reform at Defence that will create re-investment opportunities to ensure that the Defence Team of tomorrow is positioned for success. The next major milestone will be the development of a renewal charter and plan that will guide business process renewal and other change initiatives over the next three years.

As Canada ends its involvement in Afghanistan, the CAF will continue to examine the way in which it conducts operations. The new Canadian Joint Operations Command (CJOC), stood up in 2012, is part of this transformation. The CJOC mission is to plan and conduct CAF operations in accordance with CDS direction and develop, generate and integrate joint force capabilities for operations. This new command provides leaders with the ability to allocate resources where they are most needed and support domestic and international operations in a timely manner, by closing functional gaps, eliminating administrative duplication, and permitting the allocation of resources to new and emerging demands. In 2013-14, the CJOC will work closely with other government departments, the armed forces of close allies, like-minded nations, and multinational organizations. Further CAF organizational renewal initiatives will give the CAF the agility to adapt and re-invest in the fighting force as the future security environment dictates.

Equipping the Canadian Armed Forces

The Government of Canada remains committed to the renewal and replacement of core equipment fleets that will provide robust and flexible capabilities. Defence will continue to deliver on its CFDS commitments to modernize and upgrade its equipment capabilities to enable Canadian soldiers, sailors and airmen and women for success and generate economic opportunities nation-wide. National Defence will ensure that the CAF has the right equipment to undertake all of their important missions and that such equipment is procured in an efficient and cost-effective manner. 2013-14 will see continued progress on the procurement of Fixed Wing Search and Rescue aircraft for the RCAF and replacement of the RCN's surface fleet as part of the National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy, in addition to a family of land combat vehicles and systems for the Canadian Army.

Supporting the Defence Team

In everything Defence does, people have always been the most important element and in 2013-14 they will remain so. DND and the CAF will work to provide a healthy, safe and productive work environment, as well as ensure the organization has the right people, with the right training, doing the right tasks. Defence must also continue to support military families, the ill and injured, and the families of the fallen. The DND and VAC will continue to work together to improve the care available to injured soldiers and their families and continue to address their needs in a timely, consistent and meaningful way.

Financial Resources (Planned Spending - $ thousands)

The following table summarizes Defence's total planned spending for the next three fiscal years, 2013-2016.

Total Budgetary
Expenditures
(Main Estimates) 2013-14
Planned Spending
2013–14
Planned Spending
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
17,985,310 18,312,568 19,220,715 18,978,169

Sources: Assistant Deputy Minister (Finance and Corporate Services) Group

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents – FTEs)

As Defence transitions to a lower pace of operations following the end of the combat mission in Afghanistan, CAF regular and reserve force strength will be maintained at 68,000 and 27,000, respectively. From 2012 to 2015, through both headquarters and regional staff reductions, civilian Full-Time Equivalents (FTEs) are to be reduced from 26,752 to 24,814.

The following table provides Defence's total planned human resources FTEsFootnote 10for the next three fiscal years 2013-2016.

  2013-142014-152015-16
Regular Force 68,000 68,000 68,000
Primary Reserve (Class C) 600 600 600
Civilian1 25,408 24,814 24,814
TOTAL 94,008 93,414 93,414

Sources:

Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff Group, Chief Military Personnel Group, Assistant Deputy Minister (Human Resources – Civilian) Group

Note:

  1. These planning figures may be further reduced with the implementation of Budget 2012 change initiatives.

The following table provides Defence's total planned human resources for Reserve Force PersonnelFootnote 11for the next three fiscal years, 2013-2016.

  2013-142014-152015-16
Primary Reserve (all classes)
Average Paid Strength
27,000 27,000 27,000
Cadet Organizations Administration and Training Service Total Strength 8,000 8,000 8,000
Canadian Rangers
Total Strength
5,000 5,000 5,000

Sources:

Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff Group
Data Sources: Director Human Resources Information Management (DHRIM) report, Chief Military Personnel Revised Pay System for the Reserves (RPSR) monthly records

Planning Summary Tables ($ thousands)

Defence's Strategic Outcomes and Programs are aligned with each of the spending areas - Economic Affairs, Social Affairs, International Affairs and Government Affairs - of the Government of Canada's whole-of-government reporting framework.

The tables below outline Defence's actual spending from fiscal years (FY) 2010-13 and planned spending for the next three FY 2013-16, by Strategic Outcome and related Programs.

Over the next three years, Defence will continue to identify efficiencies within the Strategic Outcome and re-invest in capabilities that will yield a responsive, adaptive and multi-purpose CAF. Defence will seek to prioritize major capital acquisitions to continue to modernize and upgrade the CAF in order to meet our CFDS commitments.

Strategic OutcomeProgramActual Spending 2010–11Actual Spending 2011–12Forecast
Spending 2012–13
Planned SpendingAlignment to Government
of Canada Outcomes
2013-142014-152015-16
1. Resources are delivered
to meet Government Defence Expectation
1.1 Defence Science & Technology 384,947 399,825 319,001 278,337 267,097 262,879 An innovative and knowledge-based economyFootnote 12
1.2 Recruiting of Personnel and Initial Training1 1,117,863 1,071,324 1,274,283 1,029,592 1,051,274 1,075,934 A safe and secure world through international engagementFootnote 13
1.3 Equipment Acquisition and Disposal2 2,779,775 2,381,604 2,220,107 2,930,652 3,956,467 3,517,888 A safe and secure world through international engagementFootnote 14
1.4
Real Property Acquisition and Disposal
414,945 481,572 579,243 534,590 511,381 423,446 Strong economic growthFootnote 15
Sub-Total 4,697,530 4,334,325 4,392,633 4,773,170 5,786,220 5,280,147  

Sources: Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff Group / Assistant Deputy Minister (Finance and Corporate Services) Group
Due to rounding, figures may not add up to total shown
Notes:

  1. Forecast spending in 2012-13 is high due primarily to the allocation of funding for the implementation of payment in lieu of severance payments for members of the CAF. Further information regarding military severance can be found on the following web siteFootnote 16.
  2. The increase in planned spending starting in 2013-14 onwards is primarily related to adjustments to the spending profile of major acquisition projects to align financial resources with project acquisition timelines.

Readiness remains the main output of the Department. With the reduction in operational tempo, following our draw down from the combat mission in Afghanistan, Defence will re-focus its resource allocations to ensure the CAF stand ready to meet Government of Canada assigned missions and tasks.

Strategic OutcomeProgramActual Spending 2010–11Actual Spending 2011–12Forecast
Spending 2012–13
Planned SpendingAlignment to Government
of Canada Outcomes
2013-142014-152015-16
2. National Defence is Ready to meet Government Defence Expectations 2.1 Maritime Readiness 2,164,323 2,297,720 2,400,042 2,048,617 2,060,833 2,096,917 A safe and secure world through international engagementFootnote 17
2.2 Land Readiness 3,350,735 3,626,299 3,769,053 3,353,034 3,352,219 3,432,197 A safe and secure world through international engagementFootnote 18
2.3 Aerospace Readiness 1,781,696 1,908,491 2,029,929 1,726,717 1,742,630 1,794,228 A safe and secure world through international engagementFootnote 19
2.4 Joint and Common Readiness 2,187,920 2,337,399 2,488,263 2,175,664 2,201,670 2,204,680 A safe and secure world through international engagementFootnote 20
Sub-Total1, 2 9,484,674 10,169,909 10,687,288 9,304,032 9,357,352 9,528,022  

Sources: Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff Group / Assistant Deputy Minister (Finance and Corporate Services) Group
Due to rounding, figures may not add up to total shown
Notes:

  1. The change in planned spending in 2013-14 onwards is due to efficiencies sought through government-wide spending reviews. In addition, the change is also due to the expiry of budgetary spending authorities for Canada First Defence Strategy which had been approved for a three year period between 2010-11 and 2012-13. For 2013-14 and onwards, the department will seek renewed budgetary spending authorities.
  2. Forecast spending in 2012-13 is high due primarily to the allocation of funding for the implementation of payment in lieu of severance payments for members of the CAF. Further information regarding military severance can be found on the following web siteFootnote 21.

Over the next three years, Defence will continue to focus on providing security to Canadians both at home and abroad. Defence will work with its intergovernmental and international partners to fulfill domestic, continental and international commitments.

Strategic OutcomeProgramActual Spending 2010–11Actual Spending 2011–12Forecast
Spending 2012–13
Planned SpendingAlignment to Government
of Canada Outcomes
2013-142014-152015-16
3. Defence operations improve Peace, Stability and Security wherever deployed 3.1 Situational Awareness1 775,516 599,459 380,856 381,850 384,860 395,824 A safe and secure world through international engagementFootnote 22
3.2 Canadian Peace, Stability and Security 318,492 336,917 320,174 299,507 302,261 314,542 A safe and secure CanadaFootnote 23
3.3 Continental Peace, Stability and Security 190,987 202,580 196,244 180,551 186,035 194,771 A strong and mutually beneficial North American partnershipFootnote 24
3.4 International Peace, Stability and Security2 2,312,846 1,980,673 1,835,102 1,327,691 1,272,644 1,308,173 A safe and secure world through international engagementFootnote 25
Sub-Total 3,597,841 3,119,629 2,732,376 2,189,599 2,145,800 2,213,310  

Sources: Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff Group / Assistant Deputy Minister (Finance and Corporate Services) Group
Due to rounding, figures may not add up to total shown
Notes:

  1. The change in spending starting in 2012-13 onwards is due mainly to funding transferred to Communications Security Establishment for the establishment of the organization as a stand-alone agency.
  2. The change in planned spending, starting in 2013-14, is primarily due to the transition from a combat mission to a training mission in Afghanistan.

In this time of transition, Defence recognizes the challenges faced by our workforce and will continue to provide the Defence Team with a healthy, safe and productive work environment. The continuing support to military families, the ill and injured, and the families of the fallen will remain a primary focus of the Department.

Strategic OutcomeProgramActual Spending 2010–11Actual Spending 2011–12Forecast
Spending 2012–13
Planned SpendingAlignment to Government
of Canada Outcomes
2013-142014-152015-16
4. Care and Support to the Canadian Armed Forces and Contribution to Canadian Society 4.1 Defence Team Personnel Support1 906,016 1,002,923 1,690,316 690,425 682,374 707,240 A safe and secure world through international engagementFootnote 26
4.2 Canadian Identity 353,602 369,853 359,643 328,001 328,654 335,997 A vibrant Canadian culture and heritageFootnote 27
4.3 Environment Protection and Stewardship2 122,478 126,246 132,627 108,669 44,177 45,535 A clean and healthy environmentFootnote 28
4.4 Non-Security Support 6,479 17,317 8,020 2,310 2,117 2,118 A transparent, accountable and responsive federal governmentFootnote 29
Sub-Total 1,388,575 1,516,338 2,190,607 1,129,405 1,057,322 1,090,889  

Sources: Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff Group / Assistant Deputy Minister (Finance and Corporate Services) Group
Due to rounding, figures may not add up to total shown
Notes:

  1. The increased forecast spending for 2012-13 is due to funding received for the Manuge Class Action Lawsuit.
  2. The planned spending decreases starting in 2014-15 onwards is due to changes in funding for the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP). Funding for FCSAP expires in 2015-16.

Planning Summary Table for Internal Services ($ thousands)

ProgramActual
Spending
2010–11
Actual
Spending
2011–12
Forecast
Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013-142014-152015-16
Internal Services1 1,129,637 1,078,558 1,129,501 916,362 874,021 865,800
Sub-Total 1,129,637 1,078,558 1,129,501 916,362 874,021 865,800

Sources: Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff Group / Assistant Deputy Minister (Finance and Corporate Services) Group
Note:

  1. The change in planned spending in 2013-14 onwards is due efficiencies sought through government-wide spending reviews as well as overall changes in spending trends.

Planning Summary Total ($ thousands)

Strategic Outcome(s) Program(s), and Internal ServicesActual
Spending
2010–11
Actual
Spending
2011–12
Forecast
Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013-142014-152015-16
Total 20,298,257 20,218,758 21,132,405 18,312,568 19,220,715 18,978,169
Sources: Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff Group / Assistant Deputy Minister (Finance and Corporate Services) Group

Expenditure Profile

The following tables provide a breakdown of planned spending by program for FY 2013-14 and FY 2005-06 for comparison purposes. Although the reporting methodology has changed during this time period, overall investment in the Defence program has increased by approximately $4 billion.

Planned Spending for Fiscal Year 2013-14 by Program


[D]

Source: Assistant Deputy Minister (Finance and Corporate Services) Group
Note: Due to rounding, figures may not add up to 100 per cent.

Planned Spending for Fiscal Year 2005-06 by Program Activity


[D]

Source: Assistant Deputy Minister (Finance and Corporate Services) Group
Note: Due to rounding, figures may not add up to 100 per cent.

Financial Spending Trend


[D]

Source: Assistant Deputy Minister (Finance and Corporate Services) Group
Notes:

  1. Actual spending represents the actual expenditures incurred during the respective FY, as reported in Public Accounts.
  2. Forecast spending reflects the authorized funding levels to the end of the FY.
  3. Planned spending reflects funds already brought into the Department's reference levels as well as amounts to be authorized through the Estimates process as presented in the Annual Reference Level Update. It also includes funding approved in the government fiscal plan, but yet to be brought into the Department's reference levels.

Over the period 2012-13 to 2015-16, forecast and planned spending varies from a high of $21.1 billion in 2012-13 to a low of $18.3 billion currently planned for 2013-14. The variability of $2.8 billion is mainly the result of the two factors outlined below.

1. Defence's changes in the 2013-14 Main Estimates net authority of $1.814 billion consists mainly of:

  • $1.167 billion for reductions in departmental funding under the government-wide spending reviews; and
  • $832 million for the CFDS. This decrease is the result of the expiry of budgetary spending authorities which were approved for a three year period between 2010-11 and 2012-13. For 2013-14 and onwards, the Department will seek renewed budget spending authority to continue to meet CFDS commitments.

For detailed information for the $1.814 billion decrease, please see the Department's 2013-14 Main EstimatesFootnote 30 publication.

2. The $1.006 billion difference in planned adjustments from 2012-13 to 2013-14 is outlined in Section IV: Other Items of InterestFootnote 31 - Departmental Planned Spending.

Estimates by Vote

For information on our organizational appropriations, please see the 2013–14 Main EstimatesFootnote 32 publication.

Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy

The Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) outlines the Government of Canada's commitment to improving the transparency of environmental decision-making by articulating its key strategic environmental goals and targets. The government will be consulting the public in 2013-14 regarding the second three-year cycle of the FSDS (2013-16). The 2013-16 FSDS will be finalized in 2013-14. It will be presented as part of year end performance reporting for 2013-14.

Defence ensures that consideration of these outcomes is an integral part of its decision-making processes. In particular, through the federal Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) process, any new policy, plan, or program initiative includes an analysis of its impact on attaining the FSDS goals and targets. The results of SEAs are made public when an initiative is announced, demonstrating the department's commitment to achieving the FSDS goals and targets.

Defence contributes to Theme IV - Shrinking the Environmental Footprint - Beginning with Government as denoted by the visual identifier below.

 

These contributions are components of the following Programs and are further explained in Section II:

For additional details on Defence's activities to support sustainable development please see Section II of this RPP and Defence's Sustainable Development Strategy web pageFootnote 33. For complete details on the Strategy, please see the Federal Sustainability Development Strategy websiteFootnote 34.