Department of National Defence - Reports on Plans and Priorities 2013-14

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SECTION II : ANALYSIS OF PROGRAMS BY STRATEGIC OUTCOME

The following section describes Defence's programs and planning highlights. It includes an overview of the financial and human resources, the expected results, the performance indicators and targets for each Program, Sub-program and Sub-sub program. Programs are supported by one or more Defence Priority and related plans to advance the achievement of the expected results.

Strategic Outcome : 1. Resources are delivered to meet Government Defence Expectations

People, equipment, infrastructure, and information technology are the key resources necessary in order for Defence to deliver on our assigned tasks. This strategic outcome outlines the Defence plans for the acquisition of resources.

There are four programsFootnote 35 associated with this strategic outcome:

Program : 1.1 Defence Science & Technology

This program provides the Government of Canada with critical scientific knowledge and innovation to address defence and security challenges and needs. The S&T Program includes direction setting, program planning, program management, and capability management, execution and assessment. The Program comprises multi-year projects with activities in research, technology development, analysis and experimentation applied to inform, enable and respond to Canada's defence and security priorities over multiple time horizons extending up to a 20-year outlook. The scientific knowledge and innovation generated from these activities informs decisions on Defence capability acquisitions, readiness preparation and the conduct of operations in response to Government priorities. Activities under this program draw on internal capability and make extensive use of partnerships with Canadian industry and academia as well as international organizations.

Financial Resources ($ thousands)
Total Budgetary
Expenditures
(Main Estimates) 2013-14
Planned Spending
2013–14
Planned Spending
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
278,337 278,337 267,097 262,879

Sources: Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff Group / Assistant Deputy Minister (Finance and Corporate Services) Group
Due to rounding, figures may not add up to totals shown

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalent - FTE)
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
Military 52 52 52
Civilian 1,606 1,568 1,568
TOTAL 1,658 1,620 1,620

Sources: Chief Military Personnel Group and Assistant Deputy Minister (Human Resources-Civilian) Group

Performance Measurement
Program Expected Results Performance Indicator Target
Canadian defence and security operations are benefiting from Science & Technology (S&T) outputs S&T exploitation by CAF Operations and security operations for major events in Canada 70%
Canadian defence and security priorities are successfully addressed through exploitation of S&T outputs S&T exploitation for defence and security priorities 70%

Planning Highlights

Initiatives Supporting Plans to Meet Organizational Priorities:
Priority: Ensuring Defence Affordability
Implement Strategic Review

S&T Program

Defence Research & Development Canada (DRDC) is the science and technology agency of the Department of National Defence. DRDC will reduce Research & Development (R&D) projects, and associated contracts and personnel, that it funds through the regular annual project selection processes to achieve expected savings. The R&D projects that DRDC will fund going forward will continue to focus on the priorities of the agency, DND and the CAF.

Implement the Deficit Reduction Action Plan
  • Defence will rebalance the civilian workforce and Reserve Force to ensure the right people are in the right jobs, in the right places. Defence will also reform how it manages contracting with the goal of reducing the number of contracts, contractors, and resources expended on contracting.
Other Program initiatives:
  • S&T outputs contribute to the achievement of the following Defence strategic objectives:
    • Defence will build agile forces to carry out missions in complex and hostile environments;
    • Defence will protect and support CAF members before, during and after operations;
    • Defence will support public safety and security practitioners in their mission to protect Canadians;
    • Defence will enable the acquisition, sharing and use of critical information in support of situational awareness and decision making; and
    • Defence will anticipate, prepare for and counter the emergence of future threats by developing solutions to ensure an affordable, sustainable and effective DND/CAF.

Sub-programs

The Defence Science & Technology program is delivered through the following Sub-programs:

Human resources and performance information for these Sub-programs and associated Sub-sub-programs is available on the National Defence web siteFootnote 36.

Program : 1.2 Recruiting of Personnel and Initial Training

This program will promote National Defence as a preferred workplace with the general public and to recruit new hires for a broad range of trades and other general, professional and scientific occupations. This involve deepening Defence's connections to the various educational and ethnic communities to attract the right number and mix of people who have the skills needed to contribute in meeting the Defence Mission. Engaging in effective leadership, strategic planning, and targeted outreach activities will ensure proactive measures are taken to address the challenges arising from current labour market pressures for specific skill sets within certain geographic locations. The program will attract, select and enrol personnel and conduct initial training (basic recruit and occupational training) to military members to the Operational Functional Point. This ensures that sufficient personnel are recruited and trained with the needed skills in the appropriate occupation, now and into the future, to meet Defence requirements. This is accomplished through the provision of recruitment centres, recruitment campaigns, advertising and other outreach activities as well as the necessary training staff, facilities and associated supports.

Financial Resources ($ thousands)
Total Budgetary
Expenditures
(Main Estimates) 2013-14
Planned Spending
2013–14
Planned Spending
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
1,029,592 1,029,592 1,051,274 1,075,934

Sources: Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff Group / Assistant Deputy Minister (Finance and Corporate Services) Group
Due to rounding, figures may not add up to totals shown

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalent - FTE)
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
Military 8,855 8,855 8,855
Civilian 392 383 383
TOTAL 9,247 9,238 9,238

Sources: Chief Military Personnel Group and Assistant Deputy Minister (Human Resources-Civilian) Group

Performance Measurement
Program Expected Results Performance Indicator Target
Optimize intake today to fill the force structure of tomorrow % of Regular Force Trained Strength (TES) against Trained Establishment (TEE) 100% of Trained Effective Establishment (TEE)
The total average Reserve Force paid strength by FY (determined by Director Reserves (D Res)) compared to the target planned strength as published in annual RPP as % TBD1

Note:

  1. Target cannot be determined with Primary Reserve governance and management framework. It is estimated this target will be determined by spring 2014.

Planning Highlights

Initiatives Supporting Plans to Meet Organizational Priorities:
Priority: Ensuring Defence Affordability
Implement Strategic Review

Recruiting Detachments

  • Efficiencies in recruiting, such as the introduction of automated kiosks and on-line recruiting tools, will enable the closure of seven CAF Recruiting Detachments across Canada in Sault Ste. Marie, ON, Yellowknife, NT, Rouyn-Noranda, QC, Thunder Bay, ON, Saskatoon, SK, Bathurst, NB, and North Bay, ON. Recruiting initiatives in these affected population centres will be supported by these new initiatives and managed by other recruiting offices.

CAF Awareness Programs

  • Op Connection is the name of the ongoing CAF public awareness program launched in 2006 with a view to informing Canadians about their military's role, responsibilities and capabilities. The original mandate for Op Connection was a CAF-wide effort to attract and enrol quality recruits in sufficient numbers to meet the CAF Strategic Intake Requirements. Op Connection's mission was to connect with Canadians through a broad range of coordinated, community based activities. At the same time it was intended to reduce environment-specific (CA, RCN and RCAF) recruiting efforts which had duplicating effects and to refocus on promoting the CAF as a whole; and
  • The future of CAF participation in national and community outreach activities is being examined. Engaging and informing Canadians about their CAF is an important activity within the department, but one that must be balanced against many competing funding priorities.
Implement the Deficit Reduction Action Plan
  • Defence will rebalance the civilian workforce and Reserve Force to ensure the right people are in the right jobs, in the right places. Defence will also reform how it manages contracting with the goal of reducing the number of contracts, contractors, and resources expended on contracting; and
  • Defence will hold the strength of the Regular and Reserve Forces at current levels, 68,000 and 27,000 respectively, over the medium-term.
Priority: Strengthening the Defence Team
Advance a comprehensive plan to align and optimize the military and civilian workforce
  • Re-balance and optimize the Regular Force military workforce via ongoing management by:
    • Maintaining an overall CAF strength of 68,000 (+/- 500) while ensuring all Regular Force establishment positions are filled within acceptable thresholds; and
    • Balancing the Regular Force Trained Effective Establishment (TEE) with Trained Effective Strength (TES) by reducing Basic Training List in order to maintain the gap between TEE and TES within acceptable thresholds.
  • Develop a sustainable personnel management system through Business Process Renewal in the areas of:
    • Recruiting;
    • Training and education;
    • Career management;
    • Compensation and benefits; and
    • Conflict resolution.
  • Develop a plan that will address Primary Reserve Force personnel generation requirements and training management planning processes with the purpose of aligning the Primary Reserve Force personnel generation plan with the Regular Force Process;
  • At a time of constrained resources, Defence will renew its focus on defining and staffing under-strength civilian occupations by lowering the costs and increasing the effectiveness of the apprenticeship program through conducting a business process review; and
  • Develop and assign full-time equivalent targets to balance and sustain the civilian full-time equivalent strength in order to balance CFDS requirements, affordability and cost effectiveness.
Maximize military and civilian potential by continuing to strengthen leadership capacity, succession planning, continuous learning and professional development
  • Modernizing the CAF Individual Training and Education system to more efficiently and effectively deliver performance-oriented, learner-centric training and education at the right time, right place, and to the right people, which enables individual and collective performance to support success in operations; and
  • The publication of a draft CAF Succession Policy Framework for future consideration by senior leadership.

Sub-programs

The Recruiting of Personnel and Initial Training program is delivered through the following Sub-programs:

Human resources and performance information for these Sub-programs and associated Sub-sub-programs is available on the National Defence web siteFootnote 37.

Program : 1.3 Equipment Acquisition and Disposal

This program acquires equipment required for Canadian Armed Forces operations. This includes the acquisition of new and replacement capabilities or capital improvements to in-service equipment and dispose of them at the end of their service life. Equipment Acquisition occurs primarily through collaboration with Public Works and Government Services (PWGSC), Industry Canada (IC) and the vendors. Equipment Acquisition activities include defining requirements, engineering design, sourcing, validation of requirements, developing procurement strategy, contracting, contract negotiation and award, contract administration and management, project management of equipment acquisitions.

Financial Resources ($ thousands)
Total Budgetary
Expenditures
(Main Estimates) 2013-14
Planned Spending
2013–14
Planned Spending
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
2,603,394 2,930,652 3,956,467 3,517,888

Sources: Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff Group / Assistant Deputy Minister (Finance and Corporate Services) Group
Due to rounding, figures may not add up to totals shown
Note: The increase in planned spending starting in 2013-14 onwards is primarily related to adjustments to the spending profile of major acquisition projects to align financial resources with project acquisition timelines

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalent - FTE)
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
Military 1,046 1,046 1,046
Civilian 864 844 844
TOTAL 1,910 1,890 1,890

Sources: Chief Military Personnel Group and Assistant Deputy Minister (Human Resources-Civilian) Group

Performance Measurement
Program Expected Results Performance Indicator Target
The acquisition and disposal of equipment and materiel in accordance with the Canada First Defence Strategy (CFDS) and Investment Plan continues to modernize and strengthen the Canadian Armed Forces. % of overall planned dollars that are expended - CFDS 90%
% of projects on schedule: CFDS 90%
% of overall planned dollars that are expended: Non-CFDS 90%
% of projects on schedule: Non-CFDS 90%
% timely approvals of disposal plans and briefing note > 80%
% of timely execution of disposal plan > 80%

Planning Highlights

Defence is a participant in the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) and contributes to the Greening Government Operations targets through the Equipment Acquisition and Disposal program. The department contributes to the following target areas of Theme IV of the FSDS:

  • Surplus electronic and electrical equipment; and
  • Green procurement

For additional details on Defence's Greening Government Operations activities please see Section III: Supplementary InformationFootnote 38.

Initiatives Supporting Plans to Meet Organizational Priorities:
Priority: Ensuring Defence Affordability
Implement Strategic Review

Equipment Acquisition and Disposal

Efficiencies will help align procurement budgets more effectively with the internal capacity of project management staff. More concretely, this means that budgetary lapses should be reduced and budgets should better match the workload capacity of project management teams.

Air Defence Anti-Tank Systems (ADATS)

  • Two Air Defence Equipment components have been identified for divestment:
    1. A quantity of 34 Air Defence Anti-Tank Systems (ADATS); and
    2. Associated Air Defence Anti-Tank System missiles.
  • It is no longer a priority to operate the ADATS Air Defence system. Divesting this weapon will result in savings in National Procurement funds related to maintaining the system. The divestment of the ADATS Air Defence system will not affect military operations as the equipment is obsolete. The CAF retains several other air defence options that meet operational requirements.

TOW Weapon Systems

  • Three fleets within the wider in-service support to Close Support Weapons component have been identified for divestment:
    1. 33 Tube-launched Optically tracked Wire guided missile (TOW) Under Armour turrets;
    2. 40 TOW 2 systems; and
    3. 2,200 TOW missiles.
  • Divesting these systems will result in a savings in National Procurement maintenance funding. This weapon system has been replaced by more capable systems.

C1/C3 Howitzer and 60 mm Mortar Ammunition

  • 28 C1 Howitzers (105mm), 4 C3 Howitzers (105mm) and the Canadian Army's inventory of 60mm mortar ammunition will be divested. As a result of the recent acquisition of the M777 Howitzer, these weapons are now redundant and no longer required.

Land Mine Detection and Flail System

  • The following equipment will be divested:
    1. Four Landmine Detection Systems;
    2. Two Mini Flails; and
    3. Three Aardvark Flails.
  • By divesting this equipment a savings in National Procurement funds can be achieved. The systems have been replaced by more modern and capable systems.

Light Assault Radios and TCCCS Adaptor Cables

  • The following communications and Land Command Support System component equipment will be divested:
    • 4,500 Light Assault Radios; and
    • All Tactical Command and Control Communication System (TCCCS) adapter cables.
  • These radios and cables are part of the original TCCCS communication system which had been in service since the late 1990s. This equipment is no longer required as next generation systems have been acquired to replace them.

Ammunition Procurement Funding

  • A number of already in stock Evolved Sea Sparrow Missiles (ESSM) will be transformed into training missiles. This will allow the Department to meet training and operational requirements, while avoiding excessive procurement and surplus stock. This divestment will lead to improved business efficiency and better stock management.

Common User Materiel and Service Agreement Efficiencies

  • As a result of the mission transition in Afghanistan, savings will be generated by a reduction in future procurements of Operational Clothing and Equipment and Common User Materiel. A new Common Requirements Working Group has been established to mitigate any potential impacts and ensure the Canadian Armed Forces have the equipment and clothing required to meet its requirements under the Canada First Defence Strategy.
Implement the Deficit Reduction Action Plan
  • Defence will rebalance the civilian workforce and Reserve Force to ensure the right people are in the right jobs, in the right places. Defence will also reform how it manages contracting with the goal of reducing the number of contracts, contractors, and resources expended on contracting; and
  • Defence will take steps to further streamline and simplify the process to purchase support equipment, spare parts, and other materiel through the National Procurement (NP) budget.
Improve Defence Procurement
  • Defence will support Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC) in the development and promulgation of Government of Canada defence procurement strategy to optimize the economic impact of defence procurement and better position Canadian defence and security industry to be globally competitive by developing a strategy that is consistent with Departmental priorities and interests, while being supportive of the wider socio-economic goals of the Government of Canada;
  • Defence will manage controlled goods and associated security measures within the Department consistent with Defence Administrative Orders and Directives (DAOD) in order to ensure compliance integrity for DND as it relates to domestic and international controlled goods obligations (including United States - International Traffic in Arms Regulations (US - ITAR); and
  • Defence will define professional competencies for key Materiel Acquisition and Support (MA&S) related classifications and plan and deliver MA&S professional training and development to further professionalize the workforce.
Develop and implement initiatives to reduce capability delivery process complexity
  • A Departmental working group will develop a co-ordinated action plan so as to streamline the process;
  • Establish the Corporate Submissions Process Working Group to establish performance indicators to measure the efficiency of the new Corporate Submission process; and
  • Commence implementation of the Project Management Competency Development program to qualify DND project managers.
Other Program initiatives:

Defence will progress the following projects for land, air, and maritime forces:

  • LAND
    • Close Combat Vehicle
    • Medium Support Vehicle System Project
    • Tactical Armoured Patrol Vehicle
    • Light Armoured Vehicle III Upgrade
    • Force Mobility Enhancement
  • AIR
    • Airlift Capability Project - Tactical
    • Fixed Wing Search and Rescue
    • Canadian Multi Mission Aircraft
    • CF-18 Fighter Replacement
    • Medium to Heavy-Lift Helicopter
    • Joint Unmanned Surveillance and Target Acquisition System
    • Maritime Helicopter Project
  • MARITIME
    • Arctic Offshore Patrol Ship
    • Canadian Surface Combatant
    • Joint Support Ship
    • Halifax Class Modernization/Frigate Life Extension

Sub-programs

The Equipment Acquisition and Disposal program is delivered through the following Sub-programs:

Human resources and performance information for these Sub-programs and associated Sub-sub-programs is available on the National Defence web siteFootnote 39

Program : 1.4 Real Property Infrastructure Acquisition and Disposal

An extensive portfolio of land, works, and buildings and informatics is required to support the delivery of defence operations. The Real Property Acquisition and Informatics Infrastructure Acquisition Disposalprogram aims to ensure that the right real property and informatics is acquired and disposed of, and is available where and when needed, while providing value for money, advancing objectives for the greening of government land and buildings, and adhering to best practices for asset life-cycle management. Programs include working with stakeholders to define requirements; updating the real property and informatics development and management plans; managing projects for new and replacement construction; and identifying and eliminating excess facilities. Real property and informatics are acquired through construction and recapitalization, purchase or capital leases, and disposed of through deconstruction, sale or transfer. The activity includes the Capital Assistance Program (CAP) which is a capital contribution program under which National Defence makes financial contributions to support the transfer of infrastructure facilities to provinces, territories, municipalities and/or their agencies. CAP projects support real property goals and objectives by encouraging cost-effective solutions for the provision of infrastructure on bases and wings across Canada.

Financial Resources ($ thousands)
Total Budgetary
Expenditures
(Main Estimates) 2013-14
Planned Spending
2013–14
Planned Spending
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
534,590 534,590 511,381 423,446

Sources: Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff Group / Assistant Deputy Minister (Finance and Corporate Services) Group
Due to rounding, figures may not add up to totals shown

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalent - FTE)
  2013–142014–152015–16
Military 25 25 25
Civilian 122 119 119
TOTAL 147 144 144

Sources: Chief Military Personnel Group and Assistant Deputy Minister (Human Resources-Civilian) Group

Performance Measurement
Program Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorTarget
Defence has a rationalized, relevant, responsive RP portfolio % surplus real property land area compared to total owned and in-use land area 1%
The Capital Infrastructure Plan is advanced in an affordable and sustainable manner % of Capital Construction Program funds expended vs. planned in current year Capital Investment Plan (Infrastructure) 95%
Infrastructure recapitalization is advanced according to the targets set forth in the CFDS % of total infrastructure recapitalization expressed as a percentage of Real Property Replacement Costs (RPRC) 2.5%
Land, Works and Buildings portfolio enable DND to perform operations (i.e. safe, secure, suitable and sustainable) % of planned construction project milestone completed 90%

Planning Highlights

Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS)

Defence is a participant in the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) and contributes to the Greening Government Operations targets through the Real Property Infrastructure Acquisition and Disposal program. The department contributes to the following target areas of Theme IV of the FSDS:

  • Green Buildings; and
  • Greenhouse Gas Emissions

For additional details on Defence's Greening Government Operations activities please see Section III: Supplementary InformationFootnote 40.

Initiatives Supporting Plans to Meet Organizational Priorities:
Priority: Ensuring Defence Affordability
Implement Strategic Review

Real Property Acquisition

  • The proposal will result in efficiencies in the way real property is acquired within Defence by simplifying the overall Capital Construction Program. Efficiency improvements will be achieved by delivering capital construction projects more rapidly and at lower cost by increasing the number of design-build projects as opposed to the current delivery approach of design-bid-build.

Real Property Disposal

  • Real Property disposals are critical to ensuring a sustainable Real Property portfolio; however, disposal activities do not realize a direct benefit to Defence operations and require considerable personnel time to realize. Eventual reduction of the portfolio will free up maintenance and operating costs which can then be used to off-set life cycle costs of new and recapitalized assets. This divestment will see the elimination of real property disposal activities within Defence by consolidating all real property disposals, from a whole-of-government perspective, to one organization to best deliver the disposal program on behalf of the Government of Canada. Defence will work with other government departments to establish the best way forward.

Infrastructure-Chilliwack, Calgary, Northern Ontario and London

  • This divestment will transfer the functions of the Area Support Units (ASUs) in Chilliwack, BC, Calgary, AB, London, ON, and Northern Ontario (North Bay) to other major bases. This will allow Defence to reduce overhead. This will also increase overall efficiency and allow maintenance of funding for key priorities including training and equipment. Reserve and Cadet organizations will continue to be supported, but in a more efficient manner.

Infrastructure-Moncton, New Brunswick

  • The Minister of National Defence has provided direction for the targeted divestment of certain infrastructure holdings. For example, Defence will divest itself of its infrastructure in Moncton, NB, with the exception of two buildings used by the two Reserve Force units in the city. These reductions will allow Defence to reduce overhead by consolidating activity at major bases. This will also increase overall efficiency and allow maintenance of funding for key priorities including training and equipment.
Implement the Deficit Reduction Action Plan
  • Defence will rebalance the civilian workforce and Reserve Force to ensure the right people are in the right jobs, in the right places. Defence will also reform how it manages contracting with the goal of reducing the number of contracts, contractors, and resources expended on contracting; and
  • Defence will centralize real property management to realize financial and operational efficiencies, and ensure clients receive the infrastructure and environment support needed to enable Defence operations.
Implement Defence Infrastructure Compliance Strategy

Defence will implement a get well program to ensure compliance with Fire Protection Systems Inspection, Testing and Maintenance in accordance with the National Fire Code (NFC); and

Defence will evaluate the functional and technical aspects of Real Property Assets with a focus on health, safety, security, environment and its obligation with respect to Aboriginal rights in order to ensure real property-related activities are conducted in accordance with applicable federal Acts, Regulations, Codes and Standards.

Develop and implement Defence National Real Property Development Plan
  • Defence will develop and implement a National Real Property Development Plan that ensures the right assets are in the right place at the right time to enable Defence capabilities while contributing to DND/CAF affordability and sustainability. This plan will be aligned with Defence capabilities; and
  • Defence will continue its work to develop a National Real Property Development Plan, including the prioritization of activities, with the purpose of improving and ensuring operationally relevant capabilities and divesting legacy real property that provides limited operational utility.
Other Program initiatives:
  • Strategic disposals are complex activities involving many stakeholders and long lead times. Defence is endeavouring to expediently dispose of its strategic sites, working with Canada Lands Corporation and other government departments to resolve outstanding issues. Moreover, the Department will continue to rationalize its real property portfolio through divestments that do not support program requirements. The divestments will reduce the pressure on Defence infrastructure maintenance and repair budgets over the longer term;
  • Defence will advance the implementation of the centralization of the construction program plan by optimizing the expenditure across the portfolio. Infrastructure recapitalization is advanced according to the targets set forth in the Canada First Defence Strategy (CFDS);
  • Defence will deliver Capital Construction Projects in a timely and prioritized manner as outlined in the Capital Investment Plan (Infrastructure); and
  • Defence will continue to plan to the CFDS target of 2.5% of Real Property Replacement Costs for recapitalization in the longer term.

Sub-programs

The Real Property Infrastructure Acquisition and Disposal program is delivered through the following Sub-program:

Human resources and performance information for this Sub-program and associated Sub-sub-programs is available on the National Defence web siteFootnote 41 .

Strategic Outcome : 2. National Defence is ready to meet Government Defence Expectations

This outcome explains how resources are utilized to bring the CAF to an appropriate state of readiness, enabling Defence to defend Canada and its interests both domestically and internationally.

There are four programsFootnote 42 associated with this strategic outcome:

Program : 2.1 Maritime Readiness

This program provides Canada with a combat-capable, multi-purpose Navy. The program will generate and sustain relevant, responsive, combat capable maritime forces that are able to respond to a spectrum of tasks, as may be directed by the Government, within the required response time. This is accomplished by bringing maritime forces to a state of readiness for operations, by assembling, and organizing maritime personnel, supplies, and materiel. This includes the training and equipping of forces and the provision of their means of deployment, sustainment and recovery to defend Canadian interests domestically, continentally and internationally.

Financial Resources ($ thousands)
Total Budgetary
Expenditures
(Main Estimates) 2013-14
Planned Spending
2013–14
Planned Spending
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
2,048,617 2,048,617 2,060,833 2,096,917

Sources: Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff Group / Assistant Deputy Minister (Finance and Corporate Services) Group
Due to rounding, figures may not add up to totals shown

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalent - FTE)
  2013–142014–152015–16
Military 8,465 8,465 8,465
Civilian 4,539 4,433 4,433
TOTAL 13,004 12,898 12,898

Sources: Chief Military Personnel Group and Assistant Deputy Minister (Human Resources-Civilian) Group

Performance Measurement
Program Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorTarget
Sufficient naval units are ready to conduct domestic and international operations, up to and including combat operations, as directed by the Government of Canada % Availability of commissioned ships for operational deployment In accordance with Readiness & Sustainment Policy - Canadian Forces Controlled Document (CFCD) 129

Planning Highlights

Initiatives Supporting Plans to Meet Organizational Priorities:
Priority: Maintain Required CAF Posture and Defence Readiness
Implement CDS Direction for CAF Posture and Defence Readiness in Horizon 1
  • Defence will continue to maintain maritime forces, strategically spread geographically across the country, at the required readiness levels, to meet Government requirements; and
  • Defence will execute the maritime component of the CDS Directive - CF Force Posture and Readiness to ensure resources are aligned and available to support determined readiness levels.
Priority: Ensuring Defence Affordability
Implement Strategic Review

Maritime Readiness

  • Through this review, Defence will be able to realize significant savings in Maritime Readiness Management and structure. Through an examination of the future operational requirements of the Iroquois Class, Defence is able to reduce its ammunition expenditures and stockpiles. This will result in recurring annual savings. Further, by implementing a new approach to National Procurement maintenance support for the Halifax Class, additional recurring savings will be realized. The Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) will refocus use of its civilian and Reserve Force personnel on both coasts to provide national-level support to the maritime forces, resulting in more effective and efficient use of resources. Various other low priority activities or organizational adjustments that support Maritime Readiness will be reduced or eliminated to better focus the resources on supporting Maritime Readiness.
Implement the Deficit Reduction Action Plan
  • Defence will rebalance the civilian workforce and Reserve Force to ensure the right people are in the right jobs, in the right places. Defence will also reform how it manages contracting with the goal of reducing the number of contracts, contractors, and resources expended on contracting.

Sub-programs

The Maritime Readiness program is delivered through the following sub-programs:

Human resources and performance information for these Sub-programs and associated Sub-sub-programs is available on the National Defence web siteFootnote 43.

Program : 2.2 Land Readiness

This program provides Canada with a combat-capable, multi-purpose Army. The program will generate and sustain relevant, responsive, combat capable land forces that are effective across the spectrum of conflict, from peacekeeping and nation building to war fighting. This is accomplished by bringing land forces to a state of readiness for operations, assembling and organizing Land personnel, supplies, and materiel as well as the provision of individual and collective training to prepare land forces to defend Canadian interests domestically, continentally and internationally.

Financial Resources ($ thousands)
Total Budgetary
Expenditures
(Main Estimates) 2013-14
Planned Spending
2013–14
Planned Spending
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
3,353,034 3,353,034 3,352,219 3,432,197

Sources: Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff Group / Assistant Deputy Minister (Finance and Corporate Services) Group
Due to rounding, figures may not add up to totals shown

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalent - FTE)
  2013–142014–152015–16
Military 17,569 17,569 17,569
Civilian 4,705 4,595 4,595
TOTAL 22,274 22,164 22,164

Sources: Chief Military Personnel Group and Assistant Deputy Minister (Human Resources-Civilian) Group

Performance Measurement
Program Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorTarget
Sufficient Land Force units are ready to conduct and lead domestic and international operations, up to and including combat operations across the spectrum of conflict, as directed by the Government of Canada % of capability in accordance with Chief of the Defence Staff (CDS) force posture directives for primary international commitment. 100%
% of capability in accordance with CDS force posture directives for secondary international commitment. 100%
% of capability in accordance with CDS force posture directives for domestic and standing Government of Canada tasks 100%
The Canadian Army can sustain its force generation activities and maintain the currency of personnel, equipment and infrastructure, thus ensuring the long-term sustainment of Land Forces Assessment of the sustainability of the Canadian Army 3
Based on a 1-3 rating scale where:
3= Green
2 =Yellow
1 =Red

Planning Highlights

Initiatives Supporting Plans to Meet Organizational Priorities:
Priority: Maintain Required CAF Posture and Defence Readiness
Implement CDS Direction for CAF Posture and Defence Readiness in Horizon 1
  • Defence will continue to maintain high-readiness land operational units on standby at all times spread geographically across the country to satisfy contingency requirements of the Canadian Joint Operations Command and achieve high readiness units to satisfy contingency requirements; and
  • Defence will execute the applicable land component of the CDS Directive - CF Force Posture and Readiness in order to ensure resources are aligned and available to support determined readiness levels.
Priority: Ensuring Defence Affordability
Implement Strategic Review

Land Tiered and Training Readiness

  • With the reduction in operations in Afghanistan, the overall size of the civilian and full-time Reserve Force support staff within the Canadian Army can be reduced to a sustainable level that permits continued generation of a high quality, well-trained, combat-effective army for operations. In conjunction with an adjustment in the overall size of the work force, the Canadian Army will reduce resources devoted to non-essential training for key force generation activities and to sustainment. This includes maintenance and repair, garrison support, personnel support and IT support.
Implement the Deficit Reduction Action Plan
  • Defence will rebalance the civilian workforce and Reserve Force to ensure the right people are in the right jobs, in the right places. Defence will also reform how it manages contracting with the goal of reducing the number of contracts, contractors, and resources expended on contracting.
Other Program initiatives:
  • The Defence Managed Readiness Plan (MRP) will continue to synchronize the allocation of resources needed to train and generate combat-effective, multi-purpose land elements and maintain them at the mandated posture and level of readiness;
  • Having successfully completed its reconstitution in fall 2012, Defence is poised to generate land elements for the six core Canada First Defence Strategy mission sets;
  • Using a whole-of-government approach, Defence in partnership with Natural Resources Canada, will play an important part in enabling Arctic response and sovereignty by leading the implementation of the Canadian Forces Arctic Training Center (CFATC); and
  • By synchronizing its land readiness, training, equipment and personnel requirements, Defence will continue its transformation efforts to meet government expectations for the future.

Sub-programs

The Land Readiness program is delivered through the following sub-programs:

Human resources and performance information for these Sub-programs and associated Sub-sub-programs is available on the National Defence web siteFootnote 44 .

Program : 2.3 Aerospace Readiness

This program will provide Canada with a combat-capable, multi-purpose Air Force. The program will generate and sustain relevant, responsive, combat capable aerospace forces that are able to respond to the spectrum of tasks, as may be directed by the Government, within the required response time. This is accomplished by bringing aerospace forces to a state of readiness for operations, by assembling, and organizing aerospace personnel, supplies, and materiel. This includes the training and equipping of aerospace forces and the provision of their means of deployment, sustainment and recovery to defend Canadian interests domestically, continentally and internationally.

Financial Resources ($ thousands)
Total Budgetary
Expenditures
(Main Estimates) 2013-14
Planned Spending
2013–14
Planned Spending
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
1,726,717 1,726,717 1,742,630 1,794,228

Sources: Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff Group / Assistant Deputy Minister (Finance and Corporate Services) Group
Due to rounding, figures may not add up to totals shown

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalent - FTE)
  2013–142014–152015–16
Military 8,170 8,170 8,170
Civilian 2,109 2,060 2,060
TOTAL 10,279 10,230 10,230

Sources: Chief Military Personnel Group and Assistant Deputy Minister (Human Resources-Civilian) Group

Performance Measurement
Program Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorTarget
Relevant, responsive and effective Aerospace forces ready to conduct domestic and international operations as directed by the Government of Canada % Readiness of units (personnel and equipment) In accordance with the Managed Readiness Plan (Green)

Planning Highlights

Initiatives Supporting Plans to Meet Organizational Priorities:
Priority: Maintain Required CAF Posture and Defence Readiness
Implement CDS Direction for CAF Posture and Defence Readiness in Horizon 1
  • Defence will continue to maintain high-readiness aerospace operational units on standby at all times spread geographically across the country to satisfy contingency requirements of Canadian Joint Operations Command; and
  • Defence will execute the applicable aerospace component of the CDS Directive - CF Force Posture and Readiness to ensure resources are aligned and available to support determined readiness levels.
Priority: Ensuring Defence Affordability
Implement Strategic Review
  • Defence will action the applicable components of the Implementation Directive for Strategic Review to complete scheduled divestments in Aerospace Readiness Training and Aerospace Readiness Command and Control.

Aerospace Readiness Training

  • This divestment will achieve efficiencies through better use of technologies and alternate service deliveries, while ensuring that core aerospace and professional development training is protected to sustain core capabilities. Initiatives associated with reducing yearly flying rates (YFR) are being pursued, including increased training efficiencies and exploiting concurrent training opportunities. Use of synthetic environments (SE) will also be maximized and leveraged.

Aerospace Readiness Command and Control

  • This divestment will achieve savings through the reduction of discretionary spending at all levels in the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) in the areas of domestic travel and conferences, civilian overtime, professional contracted services and Reserve Force Temporary Class B surge. Due to high levels of operational tempo over the past few years, the RCAF increased its flexibility to respond to unforeseen requirements by maintaining levels of surge capacity. These are now open to reductions to reflect the return to a lower operational tempo.
Implement the Deficit Reduction Action Plan
  • Defence will rebalance the civilian workforce and Reserve Force to ensure the right people are in the right jobs, in the right places. Defence will also reform how it manages contracting with the goal of reducing the number of contracts, contractors, and resources expended on contracting.
Other Program initiatives:
  • CAF Aerospace Readiness will be improved through means such as a revised force employment concept and a plan for a new readiness framework that will include operational readiness certification;
  • Aerospace readiness activities will be further enhanced by re-aligning and re-balancing capability pillars, specifically to obtain reach capability in the Arctic and optimum expeditionary capacity; and
  • Aerospace force development activities will be enhanced in order to employ airpower weapon systems: most notably Command, Control, Communications, Computer, Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (C4ISR); cyber; emerging weapon strategies; and integrated simulation capabilities.

Sub-programs

The Aerospace Readiness program is delivered through the following Sub-programs:

Human resources and performance information for these Sub-programs and associated Sub-sub-programs is available on the National Defence web siteFootnote 45.

Program : 2.4 Joint and Common Readiness

This program will ensure Defence is ready to operate in a joint capacity, as directed by Government, to respond to domestic, continental and international requirements within the required response time. The program will generate and sustain forces for activities, operations and organisations in which elements of at least two services (e.g. RCN, CA, RCAF) participate. This is accomplished through the provision of training of a joint and common nature, the equipping of forces and the provision of their means to deploy in a joint capacity.

Financial Resources ($ thousands)
Total Budgetary
Expenditures
(Main Estimates) 2013-14
Planned Spending
2013–14
Planned Spending
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
2,175,664 2,175,664 2,201,670 2,204,680

Sources: Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff Group / Assistant Deputy Minister (Finance and Corporate Services) Group
Due to rounding, figures may not add up to totals shown

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalent - FTE)
  2013–142014–152015–16
Military 9,319 9,319 9,319
Civilian 4,217 4,118 4,118
TOTAL 13,536 13,437 13,437

Sources: Chief Military Personnel Group and Assistant Deputy Minister (Human Resources-Civilian) Group

Performance Measurement
Program Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorTarget
Defence is ready to organize and deploy a combination of two or more environments to meet the needs of assigned tasks % readiness of joint units/elements for high readiness 100%

Planning Highlights

Initiatives Supporting Plans to Meet Organizational Priorities:
Priority: Maintain Required CAF Posture and Defence Readiness
Implement CDS Direction for CAF Posture and Defence Readiness in Horizon 1
  • Defence will maintain Force Posture and Readiness levels of joint command and control, intelligence and surveillance, communications and sustainment capabilities to ensure strategic and operational responsiveness to threats, security challenges and crises in Canada, North America and internationally;
  • Defence will develop a Joint Force Generation plan to enable the generation and employment of joint component capabilities for extended periods of deployment as well as maintaining strategic lines of communication, international liaison and ongoing regional missions; and
  • Defence will execute the applicable joint component of the CDS Directive - CF Force Posture and Readiness in order to ensure resources are aligned and available to support determined readiness levels.
Priority: Ensuring Defence Affordability
Implement Strategic Review

Rationalization of Command and Control Systems

  • Defence will continue to seek efficiencies within our command and control structure for re-investment into operational priorities.
Implement the Deficit Reduction Action Plan
  • Defence will rebalance the civilian workforce and Reserve Force to ensure the right people are in the right jobs, in the right places. Defence will also reform how it manages contracting with the goal of reducing the number of contracts, contractors, and resources expended on contracting.
Other Program initiatives:
  • The CAF will assess the interoperability of aerospace assets in conducting operations with joint, inter-agency, and multi-national partners in the Arctic, integrating lessons learned from past exercises.

Sub-programs

The Joint and Common Readiness program is delivered through the following Sub-programs:

Human resources and performance information for these Sub-programs and associated Sub-sub-programs is available on the National Defence web siteFootnote 46 .

Strategic Outcome : 3. Defence operations improve peace, stability and security wherever deployed

Defence fulfills three roles for Canadians: defending Canada, defending North America, and contributing to international peace, stability and security. This outcome outlines these Defence roles in the context of the expected level of ambition as articulated in the Canada First Defence Strategy (CFDS).

There are four programsFootnote 47 associated with this strategic outcome:

Program : 3.1 Situational Awareness

The Government of Canada and Defence require an accurate and timely security picture and comprehensive situational awareness and threat knowledge for Canada and abroad. This program will provide credible, reliable and sustained intelligence services to Defence in support of decision making and military operations, as well as, support to other government departments in the defence and security of Canada. Work activities include geospatial intelligence, imagery intelligence, signals intelligence, and counter intelligence.

Financial Resources ($ thousands)
Total Budgetary
Expenditures
(Main Estimates) 2013-14
Planned Spending
2013–14
Planned Spending
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
381,850 381,850 384,860 395,824

Sources: Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff Group / Assistant Deputy Minister (Finance and Corporate Services) Group
Due to rounding, figures may not add up to totals shown

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalent - FTE)
  2013–142014–152015–16
Military 1,743 1,743 1,743
Civilian 445 435 435
TOTAL 2,188 2,178 2,178

Sources: Chief Military Personnel Group and Assistant Deputy Minister (Human Resources-Civilian) Group

Planning Highlights

Initiatives Supporting Plans to Meet Organizational Priorities:
Priority: Ensuring Sustainable Operational Excellence both at Home and Abroad for the Defence of Canada and the Protection of Canadians
Canadian Peace, Stability and Security
  • Defence will work in close collaboration with other government departments to provide effective intelligence support to the exercise of Canadian sovereignty, as well as planning and execution of core domestic missions as mandated by the Canada First Defence Strategy. In doing so, Defence will further build on existing cohesive efforts of the Government of Canada intelligence community, thereby enhancing the overall situational awareness of Defence and Government leaders.
International Peace, Stability and Security
  • Defence will continue to foster close intelligence partnerships with its international partners and allies in support of the successful and sustainable defence of North America, as well as the promotion of peace and security abroad. These partnerships will further Canada's ability to leverage and build on existing information, intelligence and technology sharing efforts between government and militaries, strengthening Canada's overall situational awareness in the process; and
  • The ongoing work of Canada's Defence Attachés in support of international peace and security goals will also provide both valuable insight and strengthened military-to-military relationships that will supplement and strengthen Canada's situational awareness.
Priority: Ensuring Defence Affordability
Implement Strategic Review

Situational Awareness Programme Funding

  • Funding will be reduced in specific Situational Awareness (SA) programmes. The reductions can be implemented in a manner that mitigates any adverse impact on the overall Defence SA capability. Due to the nature of the programmes, the description of these activities is classified.

Defence Intelligence Organization

  • This divestment will achieve identified efficiencies through better use of technology and alternate training deliveries, while ensuring that core CAF professional development training is maintained and Defence capabilities are not compromised.
Implement the Deficit Reduction Action Plan
  • Defence will rebalance the civilian workforce and Reserve Force to ensure the right people are in the right jobs, in the right places. Defence will also reform how it manages contracting with the goal of reducing the number of contracts, contractors, and resources expended on contracting.
Other Program initiatives:
  • Canada hosts the Halifax International Security Forum, which is a Forum and a network for thoughtful and engaged decision-makers from governments, militaries, business, academia, and the media to work together to meet emerging threats in a changing world. The Halifax International Security Forum is a major departmental priority. This annual event provides a unique opportunity for informed leaders to learn from each other, share opinions, generate new ideas and put them into action.

Sub-programs

The Situational Awareness program is delivered through the following Sub-programs:

Human resources and performance information for these Sub-programs and associated Sub-sub-programs is available on the National Defence web siteFootnote 48.

Program : 3.2 Canadian Peace, Stability and Security

This program employs the Canadian Armed Forces in the conduct of operations to ensure the safety and security of Canadians and the defence of Canada. These operations include protecting Canada's sovereignty, responding to domestic disasters or humanitarian crisis, supporting domestic security requirements, and conducting search and rescue activities. This is accomplished through the mobilization and deployment of forces within Canada. Canada CommandFootnote 49 is responsible for the conduct of all Canadian Armed Forces domestic operations - routine and contingency - and is the national operational authority for the defence of Canada.

Financial Resources ($ thousands)
Total Budgetary
Expenditures
(Main Estimates) 2013-14
Planned Spending
2013–14
Planned Spending
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
299,507 299,507 302,261 314,542

Sources: Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff Group / Assistant Deputy Minister (Finance and Corporate Services) Group
Due to rounding, figures may not add up to totals shown

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalent - FTE)
  2013–142014–152015–16
Military 940 940 940
Civilian 95 93 93
TOTAL 1,035 1,033 1,033

Sources: Chief Military Personnel Group and Assistant Deputy Minister (Human Resources-Civilian) Group

Performance Measurement
Program Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorTarget
Meeting the expectations of the public and all levels of Government, the CAF will lead in response to defence events and provide support in response to security events and domestic emergencies and crises when requested by the Government of Canada % of Commander's Intent (Operational Objectives) that have been met 100%
% of Stated Operational Effects achieved 100%
% of assigned critical tasks completed 100%

Planning Highlights

Initiatives Supporting Plans to Meet Organizational Priorities:
Priority: Ensuring Sustainable Operational Excellence both at Home and Abroad for the Defence of Canada and the Protection of Canadians
Exercise Arctic Sovereignty
  • Implement the Defence Directive for DND and the CAF in Canada's North to:
    • Inform the Force Generators of Arctic requirements; and
    • Plan and conduct joint CAF operations and activities in the Arctic.
  • Action the Group and Command tasks as required in the Defence directive to complete tasks to support CAF operations and activities in the Arctic.
Priority: Ensuring Defence Affordability
Implement Strategic Review

Port Security Units

  • Defence will cease to operate the Primary Reserve non-standing Port Security Units, initially established to provide a broad range of scalable options in support of other government departments in Canadian ports and harbours at short notice. In the event of a future port and harbour waterside security tasking, a maritime element of Regular and Reserve Force personnel will be formed, task tailored and trained for the mission in accordance with existing doctrine and procedures.

Acoustic Data and Analysis Centre Pacific

  • The two Acoustic Data and Analysis Centres (ADAC) currently located in Victoria and Halifax, will be consolidated to form one organization to be based in Halifax. This consolidation will support a more functional model of service delivery within Defence. The existing infrastructure at ADAC Pacific will be retained and used for other functions by naval units at CFB Esquimalt.
Implement the Deficit Reduction Action Plan
  • Defence will rebalance the civilian workforce and Reserve Force to ensure the right people are in the right jobs, in the right places. Defence will also reform how it manages contracting with the goal of reducing the number of contracts, contractors, and resources expended on contracting.
Other Program initiatives:
  • Defence will implement a Force Posture and Readiness for the CAF that enhances strategic and operational responsiveness in Canadian defence and security; and
  • Defence will work in close collaboration with other government departments to provide effective intelligence support to the exercise of Canadian sovereignty, as well as planning and execution of core domestic missions as mandated by the Canada First Defence Strategy. In doing so, Defence will further build on existing cohesive efforts of the Government of Canada intelligence community, thereby enhancing the overall situational awareness of Defence and Government leaders.

Sub-programs

The Canadian Peace, Stability and Security program is delivered through the following Sub-programs:

Human resources and performance information for these Sub-programs and associated Sub-sub-programs is available on the National Defence web siteFootnote 50.

Program : 3.3 Continental Peace, Stability and Security

This program employs the Canadian Armed Forces in the conduct of operations, both independently and in conjunction with allies, for the defence of North America and its approaches. Activities under this program include continental operations, as required in accordance with Government of Canada policy. This is accomplished through the mobilization and deployment of forces for the defence of North America and its approaches. Canada CommandFootnote 51 is responsible for the conduct of all continental operations - routine and contingency - and is the national operational authority for the defence of North America and its approaches.

Financial Resources ($ thousands)
Total Budgetary
Expenditures
(Main Estimates) 2013-14
Planned Spending
2013–14
Planned Spending
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
180,551 180,551 186,035 194,771

Sources: Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff Group / Assistant Deputy Minister (Finance and Corporate Services) Group
Due to rounding, figures may not add up to totals shown

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalent - FTE)
  2013–142014–152015–16
Military 516 516 516
Civilian 41 40 40
TOTAL 557 556 556

Sources: Chief Military Personnel Group and Assistant Deputy Minister (Human Resources-Civilian) Group

Performance Measurement
Program Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorTarget
Meet expectations of Governments and public that the militaries of each state will provide combined (two or more states) support in the event of defence, security and safety events when requested % of Commander's Intent (Successful planning and execution of continental operations (routine and contingency)) 100%
% of Effects achieved through successful planning and execution of continental operations (routine and contingency) 100%
% of Assigned critical tasks completed through successful planning and execution of continental operations (routine and contingency) 100%

Planning Highlights

Initiatives Supporting Plans to Meet Organizational Priorities:
Priority: Ensuring Defence Affordability
Implement Strategic Review

North Warning System

  • This divestment will achieve savings by deferring programmed maintenance and sustainment activities on some of the North Warning System (NWS) radar sites. It also involves implementing an operational readiness posture reduction on selected Short Range Radars to reduce operating costs. These changes will have no impact on operational readiness or Canada's commitment to NORAD. There will be no effect on the safety of personnel or the environment. Canada will continue to conduct the sustainment and maintenance work on the NWS, while achieving increased efficiency by adjusting the work plan to target those areas most needing the attention and deferring action on those sites/equipment not actually needing the attention in the near term.
Implement the Deficit Reduction Action Plan
  • Defence will rebalance the civilian workforce and Reserve Force to ensure the right people are in the right jobs, in the right places. Defence will also reform how it manages contracting with the goal of reducing the number of contracts, contractors, and resources expended on contracting.
Other Program initiatives:
  • Defence will maintain a Force Posture and Readiness for the CAF that ensures strategic and operational responsiveness in North American defence and security; and
  • Canada hosts the Halifax International Security Forum, which is a Forum and a network for thoughtful and engaged decision-makers from governments, militaries, business, academia, and the media to work together to meet emerging threats in a changing world. The Halifax International Security Forum is a major departmental priority. This annual event provides a unique opportunity for informed leaders to learn from each other, share opinions, generate new ideas and put them into action.

Sub-programs

The Continental Peace, Stability and Security program is delivered through the following Sub-programs:

Human resources and performance information for these Sub-programs and associated Sub-sub-programs is available on the National Defence web siteFootnote 52.

Program : 3.4 International Peace, Stability and Security

This program will contribute to global peace and security by conducting global CAF operations, across the spectrum from humanitarian assistance to combat, in concert with national and international partners, to achieve timely and decisive results in support of Canada's national interests. This is accomplished through the mobilization and deployment of forces internationally. Canadian Expeditionary Force CommandFootnote 53 is the operational command responsible for all Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) international operations, with the exception of operations conducted solely by Special Operations Forces elements.

Financial Resources ($ thousands)
Total Budgetary
Expenditures
(Main Estimates) 2013-14
Planned Spending
2013–14
Planned Spending
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
1,327,691 1,327,691 1,272,644 1,308,173

Sources: Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff Group / Assistant Deputy Minister (Finance and Corporate Services) Group
Due to rounding, figures may not add up to totals shown
Note: The change in planned spending, starting in 2013-14, is primarily due to the transition from a combat mission to a training mission in Afghanistan.

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalent - FTE)
  2013–142014–152015–16
Military 7,114 7,114 7,114
Civilian 572 559 559
TOTAL 7,686 7,673 7,673

Sources: Chief Military Personnel Group and Assistant Deputy Minister (Human Resources-Civilian) Group

Performance Measurement
Program Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorTarget
Meet expectations of Governments and public expectations to provide support in the event of defence, security and safety events in the international environment when requested % of Commander's Intent met (Successful planning and execution of international operations (routine and contingency)) 100%
% of Effects achieved through successful planning and execution of international operations (routine and contingency) 100%
% of Assigned critical tasks completed through successful planning and execution of international operations (routine and contingency) 100%

Planning Highlights

Initiatives Supporting Plans to Meet Organizational Priorities:
Priority: Ensuring Sustainable Operational Excellence both at Home and Abroad for the Defence of Canada and the Protection of Canadians
Maintain training momentum of the Canadian Contribution Training Mission - Afghanistan (CCTM-A)
  • Sustain Op ATTENTION to ensure the required Canadian troop levels are maintained;
  • Continue training of Afghan National Security Forces (ANSF) to enhance the ANSF's ability to meet personnel requirements;
  • Track training to ensure successful training of ANSF in accordance with designated performance indicators (Data Source: North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) reports):
    • The size of the ANSF Fielded Force (The size of the fielded force indicates how many Afghans have passed training and are actually deployed to an operational unit);
    • Number of transitioned Training Institutions (to Afghan management); and
    • The number of ANSF units capable of autonomous operations: as rated Independent with Advisors (the highest rating given to an ANSF unit by an ISAF partner or mentor using the Commanders Unit Assessment Tool (CUAT). A unit with this rating is deemed to be able to plan and execute operations with minimal coalition support).
  • Successfully plan and close Op ATTENTION and reconstitute personnel and materials.
Priority: Ensuring Defence Affordability
Implement Strategic Review

NATO Airborne Warning and Control System Programme Withdrawal

  • Canada will be withdrawing from the NATO Airborne Early Warning and Control (NAEW&C) program. Canada has been providing funding to NATO for the operation, maintenance, and modernization of the fleet as well as up to 150 personnel on a continuous basis since the program's inception, more than 28 years ago. The precise details and timetable for Canada's withdrawal from NAEW&C are still under discussion with NATO and will be announced once finalized. Canada is making every effort to work with NATO to minimize the impact of its departure on the NAEW&C program.

NATO Alliance Ground Surveillance Withdrawal

  • Canada will be withdrawing from the Alliance Ground Surveillance (AGS) program. Since 1995, Canada has been an active partner in the AGS program, which aims to provide NATO with a capability for persistent surveillance over wide land areas using high-altitude, long-endurance unmanned air platforms. The precise details and timetable for Canada's withdrawal from AGS are still under discussion with NATO and will be announced once finalized. Canada is making every effort to work with NATO to minimize the impact of its departure on the AGS program.
Implement the Deficit Reduction Action Plan
  • Defence will rebalance the civilian workforce and Reserve Force to ensure the right people are in the right jobs, in the right places. Defence will also reform how it manages contracting with the goal of reducing the number of contracts, contractors, and resources expended on contracting; and
  • Defence will draw down its international Junior Command and Staff Training (JCST) program currently delivered in Aldershot, Nova Scotia.
Other Program initiatives:
  • Canada hosts the Halifax International Security Forum, which is a Forum and a network for thoughtful and engaged decision-makers from governments, militaries, business, academia, and the media to work together to meet emerging threats in a changing world. The Halifax International Security Forum is a major departmental priority. This annual event provides a unique opportunity for informed leaders to learn from each other, share opinions, generate new ideas and put them into action;
  • Defence will maintain a Force Posture and Readiness for the CAF that ensures strategic and operational responsiveness to threats, security challenges and crises outside of North America;
  • Defence will continue to foster close situational awareness partnerships with its international partners and allies in support of the successful and sustainable defence of North America, as well as the promotion of peace and security abroad. These partnerships will further Canada's ability to leverage and build on existing information, intelligence and technology sharing efforts between government and militaries, strengthening Canada's overall situational awareness in the process;
  • The ongoing work of Canada's Defence Attachés in support of international peace and security goals will also provide both valuable insight and strengthen military-to-military relationships that will supplement and bolster Canada's situational awareness;
  • Expand and reinforce Canadian bilateral defence relations through the Military Training and Cooperation Program; and
  • Defence will meet personnel requirements to support United Nations, NATO, and independent missions. Examples of such missions are indicated on the following map (current as of the date indicated):

CAF International Operations

CAF International Operations
Military Personnel Deployed as of 31 January 2013

[Text description of map]

Sub-programs

The International Peace, Stability and Security program is delivered through the following Sub-programs:

Human resources and performance information for these Sub-programs and associated Sub-sub-programs is available on the National Defence web siteFootnote 54.

Strategic Outcome : 4. Care and Support to the Canadian Armed Forces and Contribution to Canadian Society

This outcome outlines the provision of care and support to Defence personnel as a key enabler to readiness and deployability. It also describes activities that reflect Defence contributions to Canadian society in a variety of ways outside the traditional role of the military, including environmental protection and contributions to Canadian identity.

There are four programsFootnote 55 associated with this strategic outcome:

Program : 4.1 Defence Team Personnel Support

The Defence Team Personnel Support program will provide a broad spectrum of support services such as financial support for education and housing and facilities services, as well as, benefits to military personnel and their families. This program will also provide learning support to Defence civilians. This program is necessary as the provision of fair and equitable support is a key element of the Social Contract between the nation and its military personnel that is essential to enhance personnel readiness and deployability, and establish the Canadian Armed Forces as an employer of choice and learning institution.

Financial Resources ($ thousands)
Total Budgetary
Expenditures
(Main Estimates) 2013-14
Planned Spending
2013–14
Planned Spending
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
690,425 690,425 682,374 707,240

Sources: Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff Group / Assistant Deputy Minister (Finance and Corporate Services) Group
Due to rounding, figures may not add up to totals shown

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalent - FTE)
  2013–142014–152015–16
Military 1,886 1,886 1,886
Civilian 1,128 1,102 1,102
TOTAL 3,014 2,988 2,988

Sources: Chief Military Personnel Group and Assistant Deputy Minister (Human Resources-Civilian) Group

Performance Measurement
Program Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorTarget
Personnel Readiness and Deployability is enhanced through comprehensive support to military personnel and their families % of Regular Force member respondents indicating dissatisfaction with the military way of life and their quality of life in the CAF 13.6% or less

Planning Highlights

Initiatives Supporting Plans to Meet Organizational Priorities:
Priority: Ensuring Defence Affordability
Implement Strategic Review

Military Housing Program

  • The Canadian Forces Housing Agency (CFHA) will implement a number of efficiencies within its allocations to achieve recurring annual savings. By divesting military housing that is surplus to requirements; significant savings will be achieved over the long term.

Discretionary Cost Move Funding

  • Due in part to a significantly increased operational tempo since 2004, the CAF experienced a requirement for greater workforce mobility. Since that time, Force Expansion, the implementation of the Operational Commands and a surge of new recruits in the training system (generally requiring several moves within the first few years of service) have placed great demands on the cost move budget. With the surge of incoming new recruits stabilizing the total number of required moves, savings efficiencies can be realized in the cost move budget.

Military College Programs

  • This divestment will refocus Royal Military College of Canada (RMCC) and the Royal Military College St-Jean (RMC SJ) academic programs to reflect core military requirements for Regular Officer Training Plan candidates and for post-graduate requirements in such disciplines as War Studies, Strategic Studies and aerospace, civil, electrical and mechanical engineering. Non-core-related programs at the colleges will be reduced to the minimum necessary to provide an adequate liberalization of the core programmes. Post-graduate programs and most research will be narrowed to core program-related subjects. Regular Officer Training Plan (ROTP) candidates who may require only generic, non-core programs for later employment in the CAF, as well as Officers requiring specialist degrees would continue to attend civilian universities. The total populations of officer cadets at RMCC and RMC SJ will not be reduced, instead the criteria for selection and recruiting into the core programmes and hence into the military colleges will be based, in large part, on optimizing the RMCC's on-campus residence capacity.

Education Reimbursement

  • This proposal will reduce the amount of Education Reimbursement provided to Regular Force CAF members by imposing new funding levels of reimbursement allowed over the course of a member's career, program eligibility criteria and by limiting funding to militarily relevant degree programs. Educational reimbursement provided to military personnel under the Wounded Warrior Program will continue to be subsidized at 100%. Educational reimbursement programs have expanded significantly for a variety of recruiting attraction and personal development reasons throughout the last decade; however, the existing program does not directly support a core military requirement. Strategic Review provided the opportunity to rationalize these programs to focus on education in support of military requirements and to reflect contemporary government and marketplace practices, including the deduction of academic improvement through income tax returns. Those elements in support of the Wounded Warrior Program will continue, reflecting DND's ongoing commitment to the care of its ill and injured personnel.

Officer Professional Military Education Program

  • This divestment will rationalize, restructure and streamline the Officer Professional Military Education (OPME) program while ensuring that a degree of university-level rigour will be retained in keeping with the intent of the 1997 MND Report to the Prime Minister as well as the strategic guidance provided in Officership 2020. Maximization of new online learning technologies will be used to achieve greater efficiencies in the delivering of the new program through distance learning.

University Training Plan Non-Commissioned Members

  • This divestment will reduce the cost of moves associated with this program. This proposal would require serving Regular Force military members selected to complete undergraduate degrees in order to qualify for commissioning, under the University Training Plan for Non Commissioned Members (UTPNCM) program, to attend a civilian university in proximity to their current posted location. They would no longer be required to attend RMCC. This would eliminate cost moves to and from Kingston. This change to the University Training Plan will encourage additional family stability as CAF members will attend a civilian university in proximity to their current posted location.

CFC Field Study Exercise

  • This divestment will eliminate Field Study Exercises (FSEs) offered by the Canadian Forces College (CFC). Considered a key part of the Joint Command and Staff Program (JCSP), these exercises include travel by students and instructional staff to study the tactics, geography and context of historical battles on the actual battlefields themselves with a view to applying these lessons in a modern context. On these trips, students are often accompanied by former members of the CAF who participated in the battles and function as guest lecturers, providing detailed accounts of the battle as they walk the battlefield. While this technique is the most effective means to impart this sort of knowledge and understanding it is expensive relative to the pedagogic value obtained. The travel will be replaced by classroom-based studies and through the use of formal military historical documents, relevant publications, and modern pedagogic techniques such as videos and gaming technology.

Military Personnel Support Programmes

  • Military Personnel Support Programmes: This initiative will reduce the cost of delivering morale and welfare programs, promote efficiencies, and transfer program delivery to protect core programs and services. The targeted transformation and rationalization of certain elements will create efficiencies while retaining core capabilities and priority enhancement. Transformation will focus on rationalizing service delivery mechanisms of the following mature programs and services:
    1. Mess Management Program/HQ Staff Rationalization (starting in early FY); and
    2. CAF Fitness, Sports and Recreation Programs (effective 1 April 2013).

Directorate of Learning Innovations

  • The Directorate of Learning Innovations (DLI), currently a part of the Canadian Defence Academy (CDA) is responsible for research, development and introduction of advanced instructional methodologies designed to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of CAF training and education. In order to improve CDA efficiency, while maintaining core effectiveness, all non-core duties will cease while core duties of the CDA's DLI will be transferred to other Directorates within CDA headquarters to improve efficiency and reduce overall costs.

CAF Member Health Care Alternate Service Delivery Initiatives

  • Alternate Service Delivery (ASD) is defined as activities that supplement the delivery of core health services and are procured from, or provided on behalf of, entities external to the Military Health Care System. ASD is utilized when wait times for public health care or CAF in-service care are excessively long. This ASD allows the early return of CAF members to full duty and subsequent availability for operations. In an effort to increase efficiency, the following ASD activities will be eliminated:
    • The CAF Health Information Line (1-800 phone line available to provide CAF members and dependants for basic health care information); and
    • Massage Therapy: the CAF will continue to offer massage therapy but only to those members currently receiving it. Massage therapy will be phased-out progressively as a treatment option until those patients no longer require it. The CAF will not extend this benefit to treat new medical conditions but will rather use other treatment options such as medication and physiotherapy.

CAF members will continue to be provided with all essential health care services and wounded CAF personnel will continue to receive the very best care possible.

Implement the Deficit Reduction Action Plan
  • Defence will rebalance the civilian workforce and Reserve Force to ensure the right people are in the right jobs, in the right places. Defence will also reform how it manages contracting with the goal of reducing the number of contracts, contractors, and resources expended on contracting.
Priority: Strengthening the Defence Team
Provide enhanced support to the ill and the injured and to the families of CAF members
  • Develop plans towards a sustainable CAF Health Care system that balances funding availability with best possible care to CAF members;
  • Further the development of a robust, interdisciplinary and harmonized mental health capacity:
    • to increase and enhance mental health clinical capabilities at bases across the country to improve health outcomes of CAF members and enhance family support services; and
    • to focus on education, prevention and intervention training that will result in more psychologically resilient CAF personnel.
  • Review Reserve Force Casualty Benefits with the aim of developing a plan to address issues.
Maximize military and civilian potential by continuing to strengthen leadership capacity, succession planning, continuous learning and professional development
  • Modernize the CAF Individual Training and Education system to more efficiently and effectively deliver performance-oriented, learner-centric training and education at the right time, right place, and to the right people, which enables individual and collective performance to support success in operations;
  • Publish a CAF Succession Plan Model in order to implement it across the department; and
  • Continue to simplify its holistic approach to civilian performance, learning, succession and talent management activities by:
    • Implementing a new integrated performance management and learning plan process;
    • Evaluating and assessing the business-driven training needs of the organization with the objective of building internal capacity and promoting employee excellence; and
    • Further enhancing its Defence Learning Network (DLN) to deliver capabilities associated with a comprehensive, integrated learning environment - anytime, anywhere - that provides access to the knowledge and training that staff require, as well as establish criteria to measure the business processes and outcomes.

Sub-programs

The Defence Team Personnel Support program is delivered through the following Sub-programs:

Human resources and performance information for these Sub-programs and associated Sub-sub-programs is available on the National Defence web siteFootnote 56.

Program : 4.2 Canadian Identity

This program preserves and promotes Canadian identity by providing youth programs, ceremonial activities and the preservation of military history. The program is necessary to demonstrate the military heritage and proficiency of the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) to Canadians and inform them of the military profession and practice in Canada. This is realized through initiatives such as ceremonial and band performances, CAF museums, CAF history and heritage books, web content and the Cadets.

Financial Resources ($ thousands)
Total Budgetary
Expenditures
(Main Estimates) 2013-14
Planned Spending
2013–14
Planned Spending
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
328,001 328,001 328,654 335,997

Sources: Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff Group / Assistant Deputy Minister (Finance and Corporate Services) Group
Due to rounding, figures may not add up to totals shown

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalent - FTE)
  2013–142014–152015–16
Military 429 429 429
Civilian 226 221 221
TOTAL 655 650 650

Sources: Chief Military Personnel Group and Assistant Deputy Minister (Human Resources-Civilian) Group

Planning Highlights

Initiatives Supporting Plans to Meet Organizational Priorities:
Priority: Ensuring Sustainable Operational Excellence both at Home and Abroad for the Defence of Canada and the Protection of Canadians
Support Government efforts for commemoration of important anniversaries
  • Develop a Defence commemoration communications strategy in order to have an effective, collaborative and coordinated public engagement strategy for commemorative events including: WWI, WWII, the Korean War, and Canada's 150th anniversary;
  • Develop a commemorative Defence events directive, based on the commemoration communication strategy, to provide direction to Defence to promote the role of Defence in Canada's history and foster pride in our Canadian identity; and
  • Implement the commemorative events directive with the purpose of encouraging greater knowledge and awareness of the role of Defence in the continued growth of Canada and the Canadian Identity.
Priority: Ensuring Defence Affordability
Implement Strategic Review

Cadet Program Overhead

  • Regional Cadet Support Unit (RCSU) North, Whitehorse, was closed following summer 2012. RCSU Prairie assumed command and control of northern cadets. Due to excess capacity in other training centres it was determined that the closure of two of the 24 Cadet Summer Training Centers (CSTC) would be viable and would not impact the Cadet Program. The lease of CSTC Becancour, QC was not renewed following the summer of 2012; and the lease of CSTC Penhold, AB will not be renewed following the summer of 2014. These divestments will not impact adversely upon local, year-round Cadet Corps or Squadron activities or reduce the numbers of Cadets sent to CSTCs. Two-week Cadet summer courses will remain in home regions and arrangements will be made to support the French-speaking Sea Cadet courses that will move outside Quebec. These measures will be carefully implemented to protect the quality of the Cadet Program.
Implement the Deficit Reduction Action Plan
  • Defence will rebalance the civilian workforce and Reserve Force to ensure the right people are in the right jobs, in the right places. Defence will also reform how it manages contracting with the goal of reducing the number of contracts, contractors, and resources expended on contracting.
Other Program initiatives:
  • Support Veterans Affairs Canada (VAC) overseas commemorative ceremonies, specifically the 60th Anniversary of the Korean Armistice in 2013;
  • Continue to support Canadian Heritage commemoration of the War of 1812;
  • Canadian Cadet ProgramFootnote 57: Defence will strive to meet the Canadian Cadet Program Growth Initiative (CPGI) objective and increase to approximately 60,000 cadets. These cadets will benefit from training local units of which approximately 22,500 will be selected to attend national activities such as biathlon, marksmanship, or one of the 24 Cadet Summer Training Centres located across the country; and
  • Junior Canadian RangersFootnote 58: There will be 138 Junior Canadian Ranger Patrols located in communities that have Canadian Rangers. Approximately 4,450 Junior Canadian Rangers will benefit from training in local communities of which 1,200 will participate in enhanced training sessions in 2013.

Sub-programs

The Canadian Identity program is delivered through the following Sub-programs:

Human resources and performance information for these Sub-programs and associated Sub-sub-programs is available on the National Defence web siteFootnote 59.

Program : 4.3 Environment Protection and Stewardship

This program promotes public health and safety and supports sustainable development on Defence lands and wherever Defence operates. It delivers multi-faceted real property/infrastructure environmental protection and stewardship compliant with applicable legislation and federal policy that extends through every level of departmental decision-making.

Financial Resources ($ thousands)
Total Budgetary
Expenditures
(Main Estimates) 2013-14
Planned Spending
2013–14
Planned Spending
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
108,669 108,669 44,177 45,535

Sources: Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff Group / Assistant Deputy Minister (Finance and Corporate Services) Group
Due to rounding, figures may not add up to totals shown
Note: The planned spending decreases starting in 2014-15 onwards is due to decreased funding for the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP). Funding for FCSAP expires in 2015-16.

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalent - FTE)
  2013–142014–152015–16
Military 63 63 63
Civilian 177 172 172
TOTAL 240 235 235

Sources: Chief Military Personnel Group and Assistant Deputy Minister (Human Resources-Civilian) Group

Performance Measurement
Program Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorTarget
Defence demonstrates responsible and sustainable environmental stewardship Defence Environmental Portfolio Performance Indicator 85%
Defence reduces departmental liability for contaminated sites % reduction in contaminated sites opening liability (sites which reported liability in the previous fiscal year) Reduce the contaminated sites liability by 7% per year

Planning Highlights

Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS)

Defence is a participant in the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) and contributes to the Greening Government Operations targets through the Environmental Protection and Stewardship program. The department contributes to the following target areas of Theme IV of the FSDS:

  • Paper Consumption; and
  • Green Meetings.

For additional details on Defence's Greening Government Operations activities please see Section III: Supplementary InformationFootnote 60.

Initiatives Supporting Plans to Meet Organizational Priorities:
Priority: Ensuring Defence Affordability
Implement Strategic Review

DND Legacy Site Program Management Efficiencies

  • The Unexploded Explosive Ordnance (UXO) program works to reduce the safety risks associated with unexploded military explosives from former training areas, weapons ranges and "legacy" wartime sites. The program oversees the identification and cataloguing of UXO-affected sites across Canada, assesses associated risks, and helps mitigate those risks through property controls, clearance operations and public education. Non-critical program activities, including the clearance of low risk areas, research and development of new clearance technologies, and enabling private sector clearance capacity will be reduced or eliminated. Greater efficiency will also be sought in the management of the UXO program, including through reducing travel expenditures and eliminating contracted communication support. These changes will not affect the safety and security of the public.
Implement the Deficit Reduction Action Plan
  • Defence will rebalance the civilian workforce and Reserve Force to ensure the right people are in the right jobs, in the right places. Defence will also reform how it manages contracting with the goal of reducing the number of contracts, contractors, and resources expended on contracting.
Develop and promulgate the Defence Environmental Strategy (DES) to ensure environmental considerations are integrated into activities supporting the Defence mandate
  • The initial implementation plan of the DES will be completed by end of 2013-14.
Implement Defence Infrastructure Compliance Strategy
  • Defence will evaluate the functional and technical aspects of Realty Assets with a focus on health, safety, security and environment in order to ensure real property related activities are conducted in accordance with applicable federal Acts, Regulations, Codes and Standards.
Other Program initiatives:
  • Defence will respond to the relevant requirements of the FSDS Greening Government Operations targets and continue implementation towards achieving those targets; and
  • Defence will continue to use Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP) fund remediation activities at the sites that pose the highest human health or environment risk and manages the associated legal, financial, operational and reputational impacts.

Sub-programs

The Environment Protection and Stewardship program is delivered through the following Sub-programs:

Human resources and performance information for these Sub-programs and associated Sub-sub-programs is available on the National Defence web siteFootnote 61.

Program : 4.4 Non-Security Support

Defence is strongly committed to contributing to Canadian society in non-operational roles. The program will provide support to develop national competency in defence issues and to the whole-of-government approach by sharing information with other government departments and non-governmental organizations. This may include the provision of grants to researchers to generate knowledge related to defence issues or provide meteorological or mapping information to other government departments in the interest of information sharing on horizontal initiatives.

Financial Resources ($ thousands)
Total Budgetary
Expenditures
(Main Estimates) 2013-14
Planned Spending
2013–14
Planned Spending
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
2,310 2,310 2,117 2,118

Sources: Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff Group / Assistant Deputy Minister (Finance and Corporate Services) Group
Due to rounding, figures may not add up to totals shown

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalent - FTE)
  2013–142014–152015–16
Military 182 182 182
Civilian 28 27 27
TOTAL 210 209 209

Sources: Chief Military Personnel Group and Assistant Deputy Minister (Human Resources-Civilian) Group

Performance Measurement
Program Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorTarget
Other government departments and non-governmental organizations will contribute to the development of a national competency in defence issues $ spent versus $ budgeted for Vote 10 (Grant & Contribution monies) 100%

Planning Highlights

Initiatives Supporting Plans to Meet Organizational Priorities:
Priority: Ensuring Defence Affordability
Implement Strategic Review

Security and Defence Forum

  • The Security and Defence Forum (SDF) is a grant program to build and support Canadian academic expertise on defence and security issues. The current funding cycle of the SDF expired on March 31, 2011, but was extended for one additional year. Defence is developing a new approach for engaging external experts, which takes into account input from the SDF community as well as the divestment associated with the Department's Strategic Review. The Conference of Defence Associations (CDA) was established in 1932 to study defence and security issues and to promote the efficiency and well-being of the CAF. The CDA represents 51 associations across Canada and is a non-partisan, independent, and non-profit organization largely comprised of retired military officials. The CDA receives a portion of its funding ($100,000/year) through a yearly grant from Defence. The current five year funding cycle for the CDA ended in FY 2011-12. This grant was examined as part of the Department's Strategic Review. After careful consideration, it was decided that the grant to the CDA would be withdrawn. Moreover, the Department cannot justify continued funding for an advocacy group when compared to other Defence activities of greater priority and relevance.
Implement the Deficit Reduction Action Plan
  • Defence will rebalance the civilian workforce and Reserve Force to ensure the right people are in the right jobs, in the right places. Defence will also reform how it manages contracting with the goal of reducing the number of contracts, contractors, and resources expended on contracting.
Other Program initiatives:
  • Canada hosts the Halifax International Security Forum, which is a Forum and a network for thoughtful and engaged decision-makers from governments, militaries, business, academia, and the media to work together to meet emerging threats in a changing world. The Halifax International Security Forum is a major departmental priority. This annual event provides a unique opportunity for informed leaders to learn from each other, share opinions, generate new ideas and put them into action.

Sub-programs

The Non-Security Support program is delivered through the following Sub-programs:

Human resources and performance information for these Sub-programs and associated Sub-sub-programs is available on the National Defence web siteFootnote 62.

Program : 5.1 Internal Services

Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. These groups are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; Acquisition Services; and Travel and Other Administrative Services. Internal Services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization and not to those provided specifically to a program.

Financial Resources ($ thousands)
Total Budgetary
Expenditures
(Main Estimates) 2013-14
Planned Spending
2013–14
Planned Spending
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
916,362 916,362 874,021 865,800

Sources: Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff Group / Assistant Deputy Minister (Finance and Corporate Services) Group
Due to rounding, figures may not add up to totals shown.
Note: The change in planned spending in 2013-14 onwards is due efficiencies sought through government-wide spending reviews as well as overall changes in spending trends

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalent - FTE)
  2013–142014–152015–16
Military 1,626 1,626 1,626
Civilian 4,143 4,046 4,046
TOTAL 5,769 5,672 5,672

Sources: Chief Military Personnel Group and Assistant Deputy Minister (Human Resources-Civilian) Group

Planning Highlights

Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS)

Defence is a participant in the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) and contributes to the Greening Government Operations targets through the Internal Services program. The department contributes to the following target areas of Theme IV of the FSDS:

  • Printing Unit Reduction

For additional details on Defence's Greening Government Operations activities please see Section III: Supplementary InformationFootnote 63.

Initiatives Supporting Plans to Meet Organizational Priorities:
Priority: Ensuring Sustainable Operational Excellence both at Home and Abroad for the Defence of Canada and the Protection of Canadians
Develop and implement initiatives to provide an integrated, secure and effective IM and IT environment in support of all Defence operations
  • Streamline the existing IM/IT Programme such that it is affordable and sustainable to deliver an efficient and adaptable CAF communication systems and network infrastructure that will be needed to support a flexible command and control capability;
  • IM/IT environment rationalization, optimization and transformation will be pursued in order to create an optimized IT footprint that supports both operational and corporate needs;
  • Enhance Defence IM/IT capability to enable CAF operations in the cyber environment and to strengthen Defence's ability to defend and operate their networks in support of operations;
  • Progress cyber security activities in order to reduce current demand and mitigate key risks and produce a cyber capability roadmap that validates concepts and addresses future capability requirements;
  • Initiate a project to provide an Integrated Defence Services Programme Planning and Management solution within the context of Departmental Business Transformation Initiative;
  • Implement technological solution and supporting architecture to enable the integrated business solution for the Defence Business Management (DBM) capability initiative;
  • Progress convergence of Command and Control (C2) systems to further integrate Secret C2 enclave for non-deployed environments and deployed operations; and
  • Improve centralized visibility and control over all Defence IM/IT expenditures in order to prevent unnecessary duplication of services amongst Defence IM/IT stakeholders, and facilitate the efficient and effective reporting of IT expenditures to the Treasury Board Secretariat.
Develop and implement initiatives to integrate security management into Departmental operations
  • Improve the certification and accreditation (C&A) process resulting in a unified security posture across Defence.
Priority: Maintaining Required CAF Posture and Defence Readiness
Advance CAF Transformation
  • Through the transfer of personnel in order to ensure a more efficient, aligned command and control functionality in the National Capital Region (NCR); and
  • By aligning the departmental governance processes to ensure a more efficient, aligned command and control functionality in the NCR.
Assess implications of evolving strategic and fiscal context for CFDS implementation
  • Develop an updated plan and strategy to move forward with the CFDS for Defence to meet the challenges of the future; and
  • Implement programmes and measures to ensure Defence has the capabilities necessary to meet government expectations in the future.
Priority: Ensuring Defence Affordability
Improve management of the Investment Plan to balance Canada First Defence Strategy requirements
  • Develop Investment Plan (IP) 2013 to create an affordable, sustainable and achievable IP that delivers on the CFDS commitments;
  • Institutionalize an IP change management and reporting process in order to improve the Department's ability to incorporate changes into IP while ensuring IP affordability and flexibility;
  • Continue to mature an integrated disposal framework and document the end-to-end disposal process in order to institutionalize disposal activities and discipline. This is supported by and aligned with a discipline divestment process, as an integral phase of the materiel life-cycle;
  • Exercise stewardship and provide a more robust analytical capability over the financial aspect of the Departmental IP; and
  • Implement life cycle costing in support of the IP in order to make strategic investment decisions.
Develop and implement Defence Business Management capability
  • Establish the Defence Business Management (DBM) capability in order to provide an enterprise level full-time capability with the authority and experience to provide a unifying construct to address the capability gap; and
  • Develop and implement new DBM methods and tools in order to ensure Defence's business is managed in an integrated and strategic manner, resulting in more efficient and effective decisions.
Implement the Administrative Services Review
  • Continue to support the establishment of Shared Services Canada.
Integrate risk and performance into Defence Planning and Management processes
  • Integrate risk and performance information in all briefings to Senior Management committees to ensure information is available to decision makers;
  • Approve and Promulgate the Performance Management Campaign Plan in order to communicate it across National Defence;
  • Develop the departmental risk management approach in order to identify and mitigate key risks through focused activities; and
  • Implement Integrated Risk Management approach into Functional Assessments and Functional Planning Guidance in order to establish a continuous, proactive and systematic process to understand, manage and communicate risk within functional areas.
Continue to strengthen the core Control Framework in support of audited Departmental financial statements
  • Establish an organizational structure responsible for the ongoing monitoring of operating effectiveness of the Departmental system of Internal Control over Financial Reporting by 2016 in order to ensure progress in accordance with the Project Plan in implementing the TBS Policy on Internal Controls;
  • Promote low risk and high sustainability in the planning cycles to improve effectiveness and timeliness with respect to the Financial Management System;
  • Promote low risk and high sustainability in the operations cycle in order to ensure that key controls as set out by Financial Management directives are well managed and operating as intended and stakeholders at all levels are aware and have a clear understanding of their roles, responsibilities, and accountabilities; and
  • Promote low risk and high sustainability in the reporting cycle in order that key risks relating to financial reporting are appropriately mitigated and improves the quality of financial information and related non-financial information for decision making and service delivery.
Continue to strengthen the core Control Framework in support of Treasury Board requirements pertaining to procurement, management and control inventories
  • Support business transformation and enabling action items for Materiel Management through Enterprise Resource Planning environment and by reducing legacy systems in order to enable all aspects of Materiel Management within the Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) environment;
  • Implement a National Stocktaking Initiative and Inventory Rationalization Program to clean-up asset inventory across DND/CAF to provide better data integrity and increased compliance with Government of Canada policies and significant reductions in associated costs; and
  • Implement Extended Warehouse Management in the Defence Resource Management Information System in order to provide the basis for accurate inventory accounting, audit and evaluation and asset visibility of CAF stores; and better management practices and oversight at bases.
Priority: Strengthening the Defence Team
Implement Public Service Renewal action plan aligned with Clerk's priorities
  • Groups and Commands establish specific plans in order to support Public Service Renewal initiatives against the themes of collaborative, innovative, high-performing, adaptable, and diverse so as to successfully implement Public Service Renewal; and
  • Improve the supporting infrastructure and critical enabling technology to facilitate more efficient and timely civilian human resource management in order to deliver services to employees and managers in a client centric manner, with improvements in quality, speed, efficiency, cost and effectiveness.
Other Program initiatives:
  • Defence will develop a renewal charter and plan that will guide business process renewal and related change initiatives over the next three years.

Sub-programs

Internal Services is delivered through the following Sub-programs:

Human resources and performance information for these Sub-programs and associated Sub-sub-programs is available on the National Defence web siteFootnote 64.