Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces - Report on Plans and Priorities 2014-15

The Honourable Rob Nicholson, P.C., Q.C., M.P. - Minister of National Defence

The Honourable Rob Nicholson, P.C., Q.C., M.P. - Minister of National Defence

Minister’s Message

It is my pleasure to report to Parliament and Canadians on the plans and priorities of the Department of National Defence (DND) and the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF)5 for 2014-15.

In 2014, we will commemorate the centennial of the First World War, the 75th anniversary of the Second World War, and we will also take time to reflect on the contribution made in Afghanistan, where our mission has just ended. This is an opportunity to remember the great sacrifices made by Canadians and our allies in all of these conflicts, and we at National Defence will work with the Canadian government to properly honour these significant occasions.

As announced in the Speech from the Throne on 16 October 2013, DND/CAF will renew the Canada First Defence Strategy (CFDS). This revised strategy will build on the successes of the original CFDS, which provided a strong defence policy framework during a period of high operational tempo. The end of Canada’s mission in Afghanistan provides an opportunity to rebalance defence resources and adapt to the new operating environment that the Canadian Armed Forces face today.   

In 2014-15, National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces will maintain a focus on the three enduring roles for the CAF, including protecting Canada’s interests at home and abroad, defending the continent, and contributing to international peace and security.  Defence will continue to conduct missions as part of a whole-of-government approach to defend Canada’s interests and keep all Canadians safe and secure.

In light of this, the primary role of the CAF remains the achievement of excellence in domestic operations.  The Government has no greater obligation than the protection of sovereignty and the security of Canadian citizens.  As part of CFDS, we will maintain a strong presence across Canada including enhancing our ability to monitor air and sea approaches, providing search and rescue assistance to Canadians in distress, and helping first responders when catastrophic events, both natural and man-made, occur.  The CAF will continue to be a pivotal player, working with whole-of-government partners in the exercise of Canada’s Arctic sovereignty, through missions and training opportunities, such as Operation NANOOK.  On the wider continent, we will work hand-in-hand with our closest ally, the United States, strengthening this important defence relationship.  Through the auspices of the North American Aerospace Defence Command (NORAD), our two countries will work together in the defence of North America, as well as conduct exercises and training to help bolster our military interoperability.  It is in the best interest of both our nations to ensure that NORAD continues to evolve and remain relevant.

In an ever-evolving security environment, threats may come in many forms, from terrorism to cyber attacks, and we must be prepared to deal with such threats as well as more conventional challenges.  The CAF have learned a tremendous amount from recent missions and we will continue to capitalize on this knowledge and experience to make significant, effective contributions to international peace and security, protecting our interests abroad and supporting our allies.   The CAF will be prepared to support international partners or multinational organizations such as the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) or the United Nations (UN), as well as provide assistance when disaster strikes.  Canada’s rapid response to Typhoon Haiyan, which struck the Philippines in fall 2013, is evidence of our ability to respond quickly in a meaningful way in times of crisis.

Not only is the global security environment evolving but so too is the fiscal situation both at home and abroad, and this requires finding efficiencies and increasing effectiveness in how we do business.  In 2014-15, National Defence will pursue the defence renewal initiative, launched in October 2013, which is critical to placing the Defence Team on strong financial footing for the future.  This is an important step in ensuring a modern Canadian military that is affordable and sustainable over the long-term.  The Government of Canada continues to work to reduce government spending, and National Defence will do its part to ensure prudent stewardship of taxpayer dollars through the implementation of government-wide spending reviews, as well as undertaking efforts to improve defence procurement practices.

DND will apply these best practices to ensure the CAF have the capabilities to carry out their important missions.  National Defence will work in close partnership with Canadian industry to secure the right equipment for our forces.  Progress continues to replace the Royal Canadian Navy’s aging fleet through the National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy – efforts that will persevere through 2014-15.  Work will also continue to find the right replacement for the Royal Canadian Air Force’s CF-18s, as well as to enhance the Canadian Army’s armoured vehicle fleet. 

Ensuring all defence priorities are addressed is a significant undertaking and none of these activities are possible without our most important resource – the Defence Team.  The military and civilian personnel of the Defence Team are an essential component in enabling the CAF to deliver excellence in all mission areas, and work will continue to ensure the defence workforce is well-positioned to achieve CFDS commitments.

The Government of Canada has a fundemental commitment to our military personnel in recognition of the sacrifices they make and the services they provide.  National Defence will provide enhanced support to our ill and injured CAF members and their families, and will ensure that its members can access timely treatment for a variety of mental illnesses, including Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.  In 2014-15, special focus will be placed on our reservists who are an essential link between CAF and Canadian communities, as well as the cadet and junior ranger programs where we will re-invest to strengthen program delivery, increase awareness and participation in the programs, and enhance partnerships and volunteerism. National Defence will also support public service renewal and the Blueprint 2020 vision of a re-aligned and high-performing public service.

I am proud of the historical achievements of the Canadian Armed Forces over the past century and proud to lead this great institution, and I look forward to working with Canadians and Parliament to support our men and women in uniform in the year ahead.

 

The Honourable Robert Nicholson, P.C., Q.C., M.P.

Minister of National Defence

 

 

SECTION I: ORGANIZATIONAL EXPENDITURE OVERVIEW

ORGANIZATIONAL PROFILE

Minister: The Honourable Robert Nicholson, P.C., Q.C., M.P.

Deputy Head: Deputy Minister Richard B. Fadden

Chief of the Defence Staff: General Thomas J. Lawson, CMM, CD

Ministerial portfolio: Department of National Defence, Canadian Armed Forces, Communications Security Establishment Canada, Military Police Complaints Commission,  Military Grievances External Review Committee, Office of the Communications Security Establishment Commissioner.

Year established: 1923

Main legislative authorities: the National Defence Act6, the Emergencies Act7, the Aeronautics Act8, the Fisheries Act9. For further information, please see the Legislation and National Defence10 page on the Department’s website.

Other: For further information, please see the About Us11 page on the Department’s web site.

 

 

ORGANIZATIONAL CONTEXT

Raison d’être

On behalf of the people of Canada, the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) and the Department of National Defence (DND) stand ready to perform three key roles:

  • Defend Canada -  by delivering excellence at home;
  • Defend North America - by being a strong and reliable partner with the United States in the defence of the continent; and
  • Contribute to International Peace and Security - by projecting leadership abroad.

 

Responsibilities

Our core responsibility is to succeed in operations within an affordable program, while preparing for future operational challenges and caring for our military members and their families.

The focus of Defence activities over the 2014-15 reporting period, as highlighted in this report, is as follows:  

  • Delivering on the Canada First Defence Strategy;
  • Continuing to deliver on Defence priorities while supporting the Government of Canada’s domestic and international goals; and
  • Carrying out the defence mission while ensuring sound management of the Defence budget and stewardship of public resources.

To accomplish these tasks, Defence must remain flexible and prepared, capable of sustaining an agile world-class force; one which is able to effectively protect Canadians at home, while remaining a strong and reliable partner on the continent, and making a valuable contribution to international security.

The Defence mandate is carried out with the support of a group of related organizations and agencies within the portfolio of the Minister of National Defence (MND), including by the Deputy Minister (DM) and Chief of the Defence Staff (CDS), and the civilians and military members who support them.  The DM is appointed by Cabinet on the advice of the Prime Minister and is the MND’s most senior civilian advisor, authorized under the law to carry out, on the Minister’s behalf, many aspects of the management and direction of the Department.  He is responsible for policy advice, departmental management, interdepartmental coordination, international defence relations, public service renewal, federal-provincial relations, and portfolio management.  He is also an Accounting Officer under the Financial Administration Act and is accountable before Parliamentary Committees to provide explanations on matters for which he is responsible.  The CDS has the direct responsibility for the control and administration of the CAF, and exercises command to give effect to the decisions and carry out the direction of the MND or Government in accordance with the National Defence Act.  The CDS is accountable for the conduct of CAF activities, as well as the readiness of the Forces and their ability to fulfill the military commitments and obligations of the Government.  The CDS is charged with advising the MND on matters relating to the CAF, including military requirements, capabilities, and options of undertaking or failing to undertake various military activities.  Whenever required, the CDS advises the Prime Minister and Cabinet directly on major military developments.

 

Canada First Defence Strategy

Released in 2008, the Canada First Defence Strategy12 (CFDS) sets a detailed roadmap for the modernization of the Canadian Armed Forces into a first-class military that can deliver excellence at home, be a strong and reliable partner in the defence of North America, and project leadership abroad by contributing meaningfully to global security.

Click on the image to see the text description that is available on a separate page

Click on the image to see the text description that is available on a separate page

 

Within these three roles, the CFDS commits National Defence to the execution of six core missions:

  • Conduct daily domestic and continental operations, including in the Arctic and through the North American Aerospace Defence Command (NORAD);
  • Support a major international event in Canada;
  • Respond to a major terrorist attack;
  • Support civil authorities during a crisis in Canada such as a natural disaster;
  • Lead and/or conduct a major international operation for an extended period; and
  • Deploy forces in response to crises elsewhere in the world for shorter periods.


The Strategy is supported by a 20-year long-term funding framework that guides balanced investments across the four pillars of military capability - personnel, equipment, readiness and infrastructure.

As committed to in the 2013 Speech from the Throne, our government will renew our Canada First Defence Strategy. In reviewing the 2008 CFDS, the government’s focus for the Canadian Armed Forces, now and into future, is to defend Canada and protect our borders; maintain sovereignty over our northern lands and waters; fight alongside our allies to defend our interests; and to respond to emergencies within Canada and around the world.

 

Strategic Outcomes and Program Alignment Architecture (PAA)

Effective fiscal year 2014-15, Defence has implemented a new Program Alignment Architecture (PAA) that more accurately represents and articulates the “Business of Defence”. It describes what Defence provides to and for Canadians while also illustrating how those contributions and effects are are created and delivered. This revised structure better positions Defence to address program granularity and interdependencies required for strategic reviews and to institutionalize a "Management for Results" paradigm that supports the strategic management of Defence.  It also provides a structure that better lends itself to conveying Defence’s performance story and demonstrating results. For a high-level explanation of the PAA and the differences between the previous and new structures, see the section on Planned Expenditures in this report.

For descriptions of Defence Programs, sub-programs and sub-sub-programs, please refer to Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcomes.

Strategic Outcome: Defence Operations and Services Improve Stability and Security, and Promote Canadian Interests and Values

1.0     Program: Defence Combat and Support Operations
      1.1       Sub-Program: Domestic and Continental Defence Operations
             1.1.1     Sub-Sub-Program: Operations to Defend Canada Against Armed Threats
             1.1.2     Sub-Sub-Program: Ongoing Defence, Security and Sovereignty of Canada Operations
             1.1.3     Sub-Sub-Program: Ongoing Defence Operations through NORAD
             1.1.4     Sub-Sub-Program: Ongoing Continental Defence Operations in Cooperation with the United States
      1.2       Sub-Program: International Combat Operations
             1.2.1     Sub-Sub-Program: International Operations over Extended Periods
             1.2.2     Sub-Sub-Program: International Crisis and Surge Response Operations
             1.2.3     Sub-Sub-Program: Ongoing Defence Operations through Standing NATO Commitments
      1.3       Sub-Program: Ongoing Centralized Operations and Operational Enablement
             1.3.1     Sub-Sub-Program: Overarching Command and Control of Domestic and International Operations
             1.3.2     Sub-Sub-Program: Ongoing Defence Intelligence Operations
             1.3.3     Sub-Sub-Program: Operational Support Services
             1.3.4     Sub-Sub-Program: Military Diplomacy and Global Engagement
2.0     Program: Defence Services and Contributions to Government
      2.1       Sub-Program: Disaster Relief and Humanitarian Operations
             2.1.1     Sub-Sub-Program: Domestic and Continental Assistance and Response Operations
             2.1.2     Sub-Sub-Program: International Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Response Operations
             2.1.3     Sub-Sub-Program: Non-Combatant Evacuation Operations
      2.2       Sub-Program: Defence Services for Canadian Safety and Security
             2.2.1     Sub-Sub-Program: Counter Terrorism, Terrorism Event Response and Consequence Management Operations
             2.2.2     Sub-Sub-Program: Assistance to Major Canadian Event Operations
             2.2.3     Sub-Sub-Program: National Search and Rescue Program
             2.2.4     Sub-Sub-Program: Search and Rescue Operations
             2.2.5     Sub-Sub-Program: Defence Services to other Government Departments and Agencies
             2.2.6     Sub-Sub-Program: Canadian Safety and Security Program
      2.3       Sub-Program: Military Heritage and Outreach
             2.3.1     Sub-Sub-Program: Military History, Heritage and Awareness
             2.3.2     Sub-Sub-Program: Youth Program

Strategic Outcome: Defence Remains Continually Prepared to Deliver National Defence and Defence Services in Alignment with Canadian Interests and Values

3.0     Program: Defence Ready Force Element Production
      3.1       Sub-Program: Force Elements Readiness Sustainment
             3.1.1     Sub-Sub-Program: Maritime Roles - Readiness Sustainment
             3.1.2     Sub-Sub-Program: Land Roles - Readiness Sustainment
             3.1.3     Sub-Sub-Program: Aerospace Roles - Readiness Sustainment
             3.1.4     Sub-Sub-Program: Special Operations Roles - Readiness Sustainment
             3.1.5     Sub-Sub-Program: Joint and Common Roles - Readiness Sustainment
      3.2       Sub-Program: Force Elements Integration Training
             3.2.1     Sub-Sub-Program: Maritime Environment - Integration Training
             3.2.2     Sub-Sub-Program: Land Environment - Integration Training
             3.2.3     Sub-Sub-Program: Aerospace Environment - Integration Training
             3.2.4     Sub-Sub-Program: Special Operations - Integration Training
             3.2.5     Sub-Sub-Program: Joint - Integration Training
             3.2.6     Sub-Sub-Program: International and Domestic - Interoperability Training
      3.3       Sub-Program: Force Elements Production
             3.3.1     Sub-Sub-Program: Maritime Environment - Force Element Production
             3.3.2     Sub-Sub-Program: Land Environment - Force Element Production
             3.3.3     Sub-Sub-Program: Aerospace Environment - Force Element Production
             3.3.4     Sub-Sub-Program: Special Operations - Force Element Production
             3.3.5     Sub-Sub-Program: Joint and Common - Force Element Production
      3.4       Sub-Program: Operational Readiness Production, Coordination and Command and Control
             3.4.1     Sub-Sub-Program: Maritime Environment - Force Element Production, Coordination and Command and Control
             3.4.2     Sub-Sub-Program: Land Environment - Force Element Production, Coordination and Command and Control
             3.4.3     Sub-Sub-Program: Aerospace Environment - Force Element Production, Coordination and Command and Control
             3.4.4     Sub-Sub-Program: Special Operations Forces - Force Element Production, Coordination and Command and Control
             3.4.5     Sub-Sub-Program: Joint and Common - Force Elements Production, Coordination and Command and Control
4.0    Program: Defence Capability Element Production
      4.1       Sub-Program: Military Personnel and Organization Lifecycle
             4.1.1     Sub-Sub-Program: Military Personnel - Regular Force Portfolio Management
             4.1.2     Sub-Sub-Program: Military Personnel - Reserve Force Portfolio Management
             4.1.3     Sub-Sub-Program: Military Personnel - Recruitment
             4.1.4     Sub-Sub-Program: Military Personnel - Transition and Release
             4.1.5     Sub-Sub-Program: Military Personnel - Professional Development Training
             4.1.6     Sub-Sub-Program: Military Personnel - Occupation Training
             4.1.7     Sub-Sub-Program: Military Personnel - Morale and Well Being
             4.1.8     Sub-Sub-Program: Military Personnel - Health Care
             4.1.9     Sub-Sub-Program: Organization - Security, Protection, Justice and Safety
             4.1.10 Sub-Sub-Program: Military Personnel and Organization - Strategic Coordination, Development and Control
      4.2       Sub-Program: Materiel Lifecycle
             4.2.1     Sub-Sub-Program: Materiel - Portfolio Management
             4.2.2     Sub-Sub-Program: Materiel – Acquisition
             4.2.3     Sub-Sub-Program: Materiel - Equipment Upgrade and Insertion
             4.2.4     Sub-Sub-Program: Materiel - Divestment and Disposal
             4.2.5     Sub-Sub-Program: Materiel - Engineering, Test, Production and Maintenance
             4.2.6     Sub-Sub-Program: Materiel - Inventory Management and Distribution
             4.2.7     Sub-Sub-Program: Materiel - Strategic Coordination, Development and Control
      4.3       Sub-Program: Real Property Lifecycle
             4.3.1     Sub-Sub-Program: Real Property - Portfolio Management
             4.3.2     Sub-Sub-Program: Real Property - Acquisition
             4.3.3     Sub-Sub-Program: Real Property - Divestment and Disposal
             4.3.4     Sub-Sub-Program: Real Property - Operations, Maintenance and Repair
             4.3.5     Sub-Sub-Program: Real Property - Environment and Remediation
             4.3.6     Sub-Sub-Program: Real Property - Strategic Coordination, Development and Control
      4.4       Sub-Program: Information Systems Lifecycle
             4.4.1     Sub-Sub-Program: Info Systems - Portfolio Management
             4.4.2     Sub-Sub-Program: Info Systems - Acquisition, Development and Deployment
             4.4.3     Sub-Sub-Program: Info Systems - System Management and User Support
             4.4.4     Sub-Sub-Program: Info Systems - Strategic Coordination, Development and Control
5.0    Program: Defence Capability Development and Research
      5.1       Sub-Program: Capability Design, Development and Integration
             5.1.1     Sub-Sub-Program: Capability Design and Management
             5.1.2     Sub-Sub-Program: Concept, Doctrine Development and Warfare Experimentation
             5.1.3     Sub-Sub-Program: Science and Systems Development and Integration
       5.2       Sub-Program: Strategic Direction and Planning Support
             5.2.1     Sub-Sub-Program: Strategic Capability Planning Support
             5.2.2     Sub-Sub-Program: Strategic Force Posture Planning Support
6.0    Program: Internal Services
      6.1       Sub-Program: Governance and Management Support
             6.1.1     Sub-Sub-Program: Management and Oversight
             6.1.2     Sub-Sub-Program: Communications
             6.1.3     Sub-Sub-Program: Legal Services
      6.2       Sub-Program: Resources Management Services
             6.2.1     Sub-Sub-Program: Human Resources Management
             6.2.2     Sub-Sub-Program: Financial Management
             6.2.3     Sub-Sub-Program: Information Management
             6.2.4     Sub-Sub-Program: Information Technology
             6.2.5     Sub-Sub-Program: Other Administrative Services
      6.3       Sub-Program: Asset Management Services
             6.3.1     Sub-Sub-Program: Real Property
             6.3.2     Sub-Sub-Program: Materiel
                6.3.3     Sub-Sub-Program: Acquisition

 

Organizational Priorities

Organizational priorities express the key areas of focus for Defence to accomplish its mission.  In 2014-15, Defence will focus on four organizational priorities presented below.

 

PriorityType1Strategic Outcomes
Ensuring Sustainable Operational Excellence both at Home and Abroad for the Defence of Canada and the Protection of Canadians Ongoing
  • Defence Operations and Services Improve Stability and Security, and Promote Canadian Interests and Values
  • Defence Remains Continually Prepared to Deliver National Defence and Defence Services in Alignment with Canadian Interests and Values
Description

Why this is a priority?

The ultimate measure of success of the Defence Team is the successful conduct of operations by the CAF to protect Canadians and Canadian national interests at home and abroad. All Defence activities and efforts must be directed towards these ends.

 

What are the plans for meeting this priority?

The following are the various priority elements common to the priority theme along with their respective plans in 2014-15. Further details are provided in Section II under the supported Strategic Outcomes.

 

Priority Element:

Defence requires an integrated and secure, flexible and agile information environment that is conducive to efficient operations and decision making.

 

Plan: Provide an integrated and effective IM and IT environment in support of all Defence operations

(See: sub-sub programs: 4.4.1: Info Systems – Portfolio Management, 4.4.3: Info Systems - System Management and User Support, 4.4.4: Info Systems – Strategic Coordination, Development and Control, 5.1.1: Capability Development and Management, 5.2.1: Strategic Capability Planning Support, 6.2.4: Information Technology)

 

Priority Element:

Policy on Government Security directs all departments and agencies to ensure that security management is an identifiable and integral element of departmental governance, programs and services. This includes a systematic and consistent approach in place to support the planning, operation and monitoring of security activities, and essential controls are in place to support interoperability and information exchange.

 

Plan: Develop and implement initiatives to integrate security management into departmental operations

(See sub-sub-programs:  4.1.9: Organization – Security, Protection, Justice and Safety, 4.4.1: Info Systems – Portfolio Management, 4.4.2: Info Systems – Acquisition, Development and Deployment, 4.4.3: Info Systems – System Management and User Support)

 

Priority Element:

In the coming years, a number of significant historical anniversaries will be celebrated.  Events such as the 100th anniversary of World War I, including a significant number of regimental centenaries, the 75th anniversary of World War II as well as the 150th anniversary of the Confederation in 2017, will all have significant resource implications.  These events represent a significant opportunity to engage Canadians and deepen their understanding of the contributions that the Royal Canadian Navy, the Canadian Army, the Royal Canadian Air Force and DND have made to the development of the nation throughout its history.

 

Plan: Support Government efforts for commemoration of important anniversaries

(See sub-sub-programs:  2.3.1: Military History, Heritage and Awareness, 6.1.2: Communications)

 

Priority Element:

Exercising arctic sovereignty is a priority of the Government of Canada, as articulated in Canada’s Northern Strategy, the Arctic Foreign Policy and the CFDS.

 

Plan: Exercise arctic sovereignty

(See: sub-sub-programs: 1.1.2: Ongoing Defence, Security and Sovereignty of Canada Operations, 1.3.1 Overarching Command and Control of Domestic and International Operations)

  

Priority Element:

Defence has a legal duty to consult with Aboriginal groups when contemplating activities that might adversely impact potential or established Aboriginal and treaty rights. Defence also has a legal obligation to respect treaties negotiated between the Crown and Aboriginal groups. These treaties can impact contracting, access to treaty settlement lands and environmental assessments. 

 

Plan: Support Government efforts with the legal obligations to the Aboriginal People of Canada

(See Sub-Sub-Program 4.3.6: Real Property – Strategic Coordination, Development and Control)

  1. Type is defined as follows: previously committed to—committed to in the first or second fiscal year prior to the subject year of the report; ongoing—committed to at least three fiscal years prior to the subject year of the report; and new—newly committed to in the reporting year of the Report on Plans and Priorities or the Departmental Performance Report.

 

PriorityType Strategic Outcomes and Programs
Maintaining Required
CAF Posture and Defence Readiness
Ongoing
  • Defence Remains Continually Prepared to Deliver National Defence and Defence Services in Alignment with Canadian Interests and Values
Description

Why this is a priority?

By reconstituting and aligning the CAF and DND post Afghanistan, Defence will maintain its ability to deliver the CFDS by managing operational readiness in support of its six core missions within Canada, in North America and in support of international operations.

 

What are the plans for meeting this priority?

The following are the various priority elements common to the priority theme along with their respective plans in 2014-15. Further details are provided in Section II under the supported Strategic Outcomes.

 

Priority Element:

The CAF must ensure resources are aligned and available to support determined readiness levels and therefore able to posture military capability to meet planned and anticipated requirements of the Government of Canada as articulated in the Canada First Defence Strategy (CFDS).

 

Plan: Implement CDS direction for CAF force posture and Defence readiness horizon 1

(See Programs:  3.0: Defence Ready Force Element Production, 4.0: Defence Capability Element Production; and sub-sub-programs: 3.1.1: Maritime Roles – Readiness Sustainment, 3.1.2: Land Roles – Readiness Sustainment, 3.1.3: Aerospace  Roles – Readiness Sustainment)

 

Priority Element:

The CFDS is the primary guiding document for Defence and across the Defence Portfolio.  The Government will undertake a review of the strategy in order to provide direction and ensure the Defence Team is balanced and positioned to meet current and future challenges.

 

Plan: Undertake CFDS renewal

(See Sub-Sub-Program 6.1.1: Management and Oversight)

 

PriorityTypeStrategic Outcomes and Programs
Strengthening the Defence Team Ongoing
  • Defence Remains Continually Prepared to Deliver National Defence and Defence Services in Alignment with Canadian Interests and Values
Description

Why this is a priority?

By investing in the Personnel pillar of CFDS – military and civilian, National Defence will align the Defence Team to ensure successful execution of the six core missions within Canada, North America and around the globe.

 

What are the plans for meeting this priority?

The following are the various priority elements common to the priority theme along with their respective plans in 2014-15. Further details are provided in Section II under the supported Strategic Outcomes.

 

Priority Element:

Defence has a moral commitment to military personnel in recognition of the sacrifices they make and the services they render. The duty and responsibility to care for our current and former members and their families reside especially with the leadership of the CAF, DND and Veterans Affairs Canada.  Included under this priority is the psychological fitness of military personnel which is an essential component of operational effectiveness and a key part of the fundamental obligation of the CAF to promote the well-being of their personnel.

 

Plan: Provide enhanced support to the ill and the injured and to the families of CAF members

(See sub-sub-programs:  4.1.7: Military Personnel – Morale and Well Being, 4.1.8: Military Personnel – Health Care)

 

Priority Element:

The CFDS is committed to ensuring a first-class, modern military that is well-trained, well-equipped and ready to take on the challenges of the 21st century. The personnel pillar of the CFDS is a critical component in enabling the CAF to deliver excellence at home, and be a strong and reliable defence partner of North America and a valuable contributor to overseas operations. 

 

Plan: Advance a comprehensive plan to optimize the military and civilian workforce

(See sub-sub-programs:  4.1.10: Military Personnel and Organization – Strategic Coordination, Development and Control, 5.1.1: Capability Design and Management, 6.2.1: Human Resources Management)

 

Priority Element:

Defence requires an adaptive, agile and responsive personnel management system that meets personnel capability requirements and provides progressive professional development and competency-based employment to meet organizational needs.  A workforce that has the tools, knowledge, developmental plans and learning opportunities is essential to a fully-integrated, flexible, multi-role combat-capable Defence Team.

 

Plan: Maximize military and civilian potential by continuing to strengthen leadership capacity through succession planning, continuous learning and professional development

(See sub-sub-programs:  4.1.10: Military Personnel and Organization – Strategic Coordination, Development and Control, 6.2.1: Human Resources Management)

 

Priority Element:

Public Service Renewal is an overarching Public Service strategy to provide excellent advice and service to Government and Canadians.

Plan: Implement Public Service Renewal action plan aligned with the Clerk’s priorities

(See Sub-Sub-Program:  6.2.1: Human Resources Management)

 

Priority Element:

The operational effectiveness of DND and the CAF depends on the formulation and implementation of specific programs to maximize the prevention of hazardous occurrences and minimize the impact of injury, illness and disease, thus contributing to the morale and well-being of all personnel.

 

Plan: Improve Defence Occupational Health and Safety Strategy

(See Sub-Sub-Program:  4.1.9: Organization – Security, Protection, Justice and Safety)

 

PriorityTypeStrategic Outcomes and Programs
Ensuring Defence Affordability Ongoing
  • Defence Operations and Services Improve Stability and Security, and Promote Canadian Interests and Values
  • Defence Remains Continually Prepared to Deliver National Defence and Defence Services in Alignment with Canadian Interests and Values
Description

Why this is a priority?

To ensure Defence affordability in the short, medium and long term, the Defence Team must balance each of the four pillars of CFDS – Personnel, Equipment, Readiness and Infrastructure - and carefully manage investments to maximize capability output, ensure stewardship of Defence resources and deliver best value for Canada.

 

What are the plans for meeting this priority?

The following are the various priority elements common to the priority theme along with their respective plans in 2014-15. Further details are provided in Section II under the supported Strategic Outcomes.

 

Priority Element:

Defence must maintain affordable and sustainable investment planning that delivers on CFDS commitments while also accounting for the potential for cost increases and funding requirements for new and expanded capabilities.

 

Plan: Improve investment planning and management to balance CFDS requirements

(See sub-sub-programs:  4.2.1: Materiel – Portfolio Management, 4.2.4: Materiel – Divestment and Disposal, 5.2.1: Strategic Capability Planning Support, 6.2.2: Financial Management)

 

Priority Element:

Defence requires a corporate governance and business framework to deliver sustainable business management efficiencies, effectiveness and accountability in order to maintain public confidence and trust.

 

Plan: Develop and implement Defence Business Management Capability

(See Sub-Sub-Program:  6.1.1: Management and Oversight)

 

Priority Element:

The Government has introduced a new organization, Shared Services Canada to maximize efficiencies while improving the delivery of common Government services to departments by streamlining and consolidating government networks, data centres and email systems.

 

Plan: Implement the transition to Shared Services Canada

(See sub-sub-programs:  4.4.4: Info Systems – Strategic Coordination, Development and Control)

 

Priority Element:

Defence must improve its capacity for timely delivery of capital assets to meet the CFDS objectives and maximize the broader economic agenda of the Government.

 

Plan: Improve Defence procurement

(See sub-sub-programs:  4.2.2: Materiel – Acquisition, 4.2.6: Materiel – Inventory Management and Distribution, 4.2.7: Materiel – Strategic Coordination, Development and Control)

 

Priority Element:

Defence must be able to demonstrate compliance with Government regulations and Treasury Board mandatory reporting requirements pertaining to procurement, management and control of inventories.

 

Plan: Continue to strengthen the core control framework in support of Treasury Board requirements pertaining to procurement, management and control of inventories

(See Sub-Sub-Program:  4.2.6: Materiel – Inventory Management and Distribution )

 

Priority Element:

The Defence Environmental Strategy is a Department priority that is being developed as a way forward for environmentally sustainable defence management over the next 20 years. Its impetus stems from the ongoing requirement of integrating environmental considerations into the wide breadth of activities undertaken within Defence in support of the four pillars upon which Canada's military capabilities are built: personnel, equipment, infrastructure and readiness.

 

Plan: Promulgate the Defence environmental strategy

(See sub-sub-program:  4.3.5: Real Property – Environment and Remediation)

 

Priority Element:

Defence must demonstrate compliance with architectural, fire protection, engineering, environmental and related legislation, Government of Canada policies and agreements. The real property compliance strategy is a priority because the strategy will allow National Defence to make consistent and informed decisions in the prioritization, and risk management for the compliance with these requirements.

 

Plan: Implement Defence infrastructure compliance strategy

(See sub-sub-program:  4.3.6: Real Property – Strategic Coordination, Development and Control)

 

Priority Element:

In the wake of the global financial crisis and with budget restraint measures, it is clear that we need to be better at achieving the maximum value of every dollar in order to carry the CFDS momentum forward.  Defence renewal is critical to placing the Defence Team on a strong financial foundation for the future. Our renewal vision for the Defence Team is a lean and efficient organization that continuously finds way to better conduct the business of defence, that frees up resources to be reinvested in operational capabilities and readiness, and that delivers the best military capabilities at the best value for Canadians, in a manner that is affordable and sustainable over the long term.

 

Plan: Implement Defence renewal

(See sub-sub-programs:  2.3.2: Youth Program, 4.1.1: Military Personnel –  Regular Force Portfolio Management, 4.1.2: Military Personnel – Reserve Force Portfolio Management, 4.1.3: Military Personnel – Recruitment, 4.1.5: Military Personnel – Professional Development Training, 4.2.2: Materiel – Acquisition, 4.2.5: Materiel – Engineering, Test, Production and Maintenance, 4.2.6: Materiel – Inventory Management and Distribution, 4.2.7: Materiel – Strategic Coordination, Development and Control, 4.3.1: Real Property – Portfolio Management, 4.3.2: Real Property – Acquisition, 4.3.6: Real Property – Strategic Coordination, Development and Control, 4.4.1: Info Systems – Portfolio Management, 4.4.2: Info Systems – Acquisition, Development and Deployment, 4.4.3: Info Systems – System Management and User Support, 4.4.4: Info Systems – Strategic Coordination, Development and Control, 5.1.2: Concept, Doctrine Development and Warfare Experimentation, 5.2.2: Strategic Force Posture Planning Support, 6.1.1: Management and Oversight, 6.2.1: Human Resources Management)

 

Risk Analysis

Defence is influenced by a wide range of external and internal factors, both domestic and international, that have an impact on how we carry out our mandate. These factors present us with both risks and opportunities, which are taken into account as we deliver on our roles and responsibilities. By continuously monitoring emerging issues, developments and trends, we can anticipate and respond to challenges and the risks associated with them.

For FY 2014-15, six key Corporate Risks having a Defence-wide impact are highlighted. To fulfill the Government of Canada's expectations, Defence will manage these Corporate Risks in an effective manner.

For details, see the links to the Program Alignment Architecture (PAA) or to the organizational priorities related to these risks in the tables below. Only the applicable PAA links for the initiatives covered within this report are shown. There are other existing controls in place responding to these risks.

 

Key Risks

RiskRisk Response StrategyLink to Program Alignment Architecture

Defence Readiness
There is a risk that a major
unexpected event may require
Defence to reallocate resources
at short notice, which may
dramatically affect ongoing
missions and jeopardize the Government’s international security related commitments.

Defence will advance the following priority.

CDS direction for CAF force posture and Defence readiness horizon 1

  • In order to have the best possible readiness based on the continuous assessment of the international and domestic situations.
  • Due to the importance of this risk, it will continue to be monitored closely and additional resources allocated and controls implemented as required.

 

RiskRisk Response StrategyLink to Program
Alignment Architecture

Defence Team Capacity
There is a risk that Defence will
not have the right number of
personnel with the right competency, at the right place, and at the right time, which may affect itscapability to fulfill
current or future Government of Canada and Defence expectations.

Defence will advance the following priorities.

Implement Defence renewal

  • In order to effectively and efficiently employ the Defence Team, Defence will optimize spans of control to the appropriate levels, minimize cost and improve business agility.

Provide enhanced support to the ill and the injured and to the families of CAF members

  • In order to meet the unique needs of casualties and their families, disability management programs, services and benefits are harmonized through the liaison with Veterans Affairs Canada and health partners. The goal is to get the ill and injured healthy and back on the Defence Team as productive members. Where this is not possible, to provide enabling tools to assist with a seamless transition into civilian life and workforce. To assist in transition, efforts will be made to ensure that skills, training and experience gained as a result of military servide directly translate to match sought after employment requirements in the private and public service.

Advance a comprehensive plan or initiatives to align and optimize the military and civilian workforce

  • In order to ensure the right personnel, with the right qualifications, are in the right place at the right time.

Maximize military and civilian potential by continuing to strengthen leadership capacity, succession planning, continuous learning and professional development

  • In order to create and maintain a workforce that has the tools, knowledge, developmental plans and learning opportunities essential to a fully-integrated, flexible, multi-role, combat-capable Defence Team.

 

RiskRisk Response StrategyLink to Program
Alignment Architecture

Investment Planning Flexibility
There is a risk that National Defence will be unable to fund new requirements or major acquisition cost increases and it may not be possible to take advantage of opportunities that arise. 

  

Defence will advance the following priorities.

Improve investment planning and management to balance CFDS requirements

  • In order to maintain an affordable and sustainable plan that delivers on the CFDS commitments in light of the potential for cost increases and funding requirements for new and expanded capabilities.

Develop and implement the Defence Business Management Capability

  • In order to prioritize, align and integrate policies, processes, resources and systems.

Implement Defence renewal

  • In order to ensure the current real property portfolio is centralized,  affordable and sustainable, and fully aligned with Defence's requirements.

 

RiskRisk Response StrategyLink to Program Alignment Architecture

Capability Delivery Process Complexity
There is a risk that the
complexity of development,
programme approval and Government of Canada defence procurement processes will prevent
Defence from meeting its investment targets in
critical physical assets
(equipment, physical and information infrastructure
and real property) in a timely, sustainable and affordable
manner to enable CAF operations.

Defence will advance the following priorities.

Improve Defence procurement

  • In order to ensure timely delivery of capital assets to meet the CFDS objectives and maximize the broader economic agenda of the Government via Strengthening Government – Industry Relationships, Technology Management, Procurement Management and Policy Enablers.

Develop and Implement the Defence Business Management Capability

  • In order to prioritize, align and integrate policies, processes, resources and systems.

Implement Defence renewal

  • In order to ensure:
    • the current real property portfolio is centralized and fully aligned with DND/CAF requirements, affordable and sustainable;
      and
    • project approval processes are efficient and agile, and of value to Canadians, at meeting CAF requirements.

 

RiskRisk Response StrategyLink to ProgramAlignment Architecture

Security
There is a risk that the
Defence security
infrastructure is insufficient
to ensure that Defence can support its overall defence
readiness, capacity, and
ability to operate as a
trusted partner.

Defence will advance the following priority.

Develop and implement initiatives to integrate security management into Defence operations

  • In order to ensure that security management is an integral element of departmental governance, programs and services.

 

 

 

 

RiskRisk Response StrategyLink to Program Alignment Architecture

Integrated IM/IT (Opportunity)
There is an opportunity for
Defence to take advantage
of emerging technology to
further an integrated IM/IT
infrastructure that can
provide a flexible and agile
information environment
conducive to efficient interoperable joint CAF operations and executive
Defence decision-making,
while achieving value for
money anddemonstrating
sound stewardship.

 

Defence will advance the following priorities.

Develop and implement initiatives to provide an integrated, secure and effective IM and IT environment in support of all Defence operations

  • In order to ensure an IM and IT environment that enables efficient and effective CAF operational and DND business decision making.

Develop and Implement Defence Business Management Capability

  • In order to prioritize, align and integrate policies, processes, resources and systems.

 

 

PLANNED EXPENDITURES

Budgetary Financial Resources (Planned Spending - dollars)

2014-15

Main Estimates

 2014-15

Planned Spending

 2015-16

Planned Spending

 2016-17

Planned Spending

18,661,554,387 18,224,737,824 19,000,002,191 17,590,692,762

Sources: Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff Group / Assistant Deputy Minister (Finance and Corporate Services) Group

Note: The net decrease of $1.4 billion between 2015-16 and 2016-17 planned spending is attributed to the net adjustment to spending on major capital equipment and infrastructure project.

 

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents - FTEs)

The following table provides Defence’s total planned human resources FTEs13 for the next three fiscal years 2014-2017.

 2014-152015-162016-17
Regular Force 68,000 68,000 68,000
Civilian 24,269 24,269 24,269
TOTAL 92,269 92,269 92,269

Sources: Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff Group / Assistant Deputy Minister (Human Resources - Civilian) Group      

 

The following table provides Defence’s total planned human resources for Reserve Force Personnel14 for the next three fiscal years, 2014-2017.

 2014-152015-162016-17

Primary Reserve

Average Paid Strength

27,000 27,000 27,000

Cadet Organizations

Administration

and Training Service

Total Strength

8,000 8,000 8,000

Canadian Rangers

Total Strength

5,000 5,000 5,000

Source: Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff Group

 

Budgetary Planning Summary for Strategic Outcomes and Programs (dollars)

Strategic Outcomes,
Programs and
Internal Services
2011-12
Expenditures
2012-13
Expenditures
2013-14
Forecast
Spending
2014-15
Main
Estimates
2014-15
Planned
Spending
2015-16
Planned
Spending
2016-17
Planned
Spending
Strategic Outcome 1 –
Defence Operations and Services Improve Stability and Security, and Promote Canadian Interests and Values
Program 1.0
Defence Combat and
Support Operations
2,224,886,943 1,542,935,869 1,382,007,119 1,363,942,347 1,363,942,347 1,372,239,572 1,390,855,201   

Program 2.0
Defence Services
and Contributions
to Government

457,149,736 438,761,017 430,440,067 407,959,811 407,959,811 418,761,047 427,025,415   
Strategic Outcome 1
Subtotal
2,682,036,680 1,981,696,886 1,812,447,186 1,771,902,158 1,771,902,158 1,791,000,619 1,817,880,616   
Strategic Outcome 2 –
Defence Remains Continually Prepared to Deliver National Defence and Defence Services in Alignment with Canadian Interests and Values
Program 3.0
Defence Ready Force
Element Production
3,400,255,359 3,443,414,107 3,172,653,151 3,039,436,884 3,039,436,885 3,078,738,897 3,106,529,791   
Program 4.0
Defence Capability
Element Production
13,128,277,142 13,564,639,358 13,174,674,388 13,086,304,225 12,649,487,661 13,345,623,568 11,864,493,069   
Program 5.0
Defence Capability
Development and
Research
484,809,801 452,080,281 375,954,215 326,339,123 326,339,123 334,986,231 342,008,495   
Strategic Outcome 2
Subtotal
17,013,342,302 17,460,133,746 16,723,281,754 16,452,080,231 16,015,263,668 16,759,348,696 15,313,031,354   
Internal Services 523,378,880 536,359,499 456,158,655 437,571,998 437,571,998 449,652,876 459,780,791   
Total1 20,218,757,861 19,978,190,131 18,991,887,596 18,661,554,387 18,224,737,824 19,000,002,191 17,590,692,762

Sources: Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff Group / Assistant Deputy Minister (Finance and Corporate Services) Group

Notes:

1. The net decrease of $1.4 billion between 2015-16 and 2016-17 planned spending is attributed to the net adjustment to spending on major capital equipment and infrastructure projects.

2. Due to rounding, figures may not add up to total shown.

 

In fiscal year 2014-15, National Defence will implement a new Program Alignment Architecture (PAA) composed of five Programs plus Internal Services.  While the business of Defence remains unchanged, the articulation of that business is fundamentally altered in the new PAA.   The activities associated with the Programs were aligned, and in many cases regrouped, in the new PAA.

Programs 1.0 Defence Combat and Support Operations and 2.0 Defence Services and Contributions to Government cover activities similar to those under the third Strategic Outcome from the former PAA - Defence Operations improve Peace, Stability and Security wherever Deployed.  To reflect the full spectrum of operations and services, Program 2.0 also includes services provided to the public such as Cadets and Remembrance Day ceremonies. 

To conduct combat operations and provide the required Defence services, National Defence utilizes Ready Force Elements that are available for employment.  Program 3.0 Defence Ready Force Element Production, which is akin to the Readiness programs of the former PAA, was re-scoped to cover only activities directly related to assembling, integrating and training Force Elements.  Supporting activities, such as infrastructure management, were shifted to the appropriate Capability Element lifecycle Program within Program 4.0 Defence Capability Element Production.

Force Elements are drawn from the fundamental elements of Defence Capability, namely Military Personnel, Materiel, Real Property and Information Systems.  This is the focus of Program 4.0 Defence Capability Element Production. With a focus on the elements required to ready the Force Elements, this area looks at the various capabilities over their lifecycle and, as such, it consumes approximately 70% of the Defence budget.  With the exception of Defence Science and Technology, all Programs under the first Strategic Outcome from the former PAA, Resources are Acquired to meet Government Defence Expectations, are found in this Program. Additionally, this Program includes base support, infrastructure and equipment maintenance activities formerly aligned to the Readiness Programs.  

To develop the current military force and define future requirements, dedicated research, development, and planning are necessary to align with strategic decisions. Program 5.0 Defence Capability Development and Research was created to delineate the military focused research, analysis and planning activities from its associated corporate functions.  Activities in this new Program are drawn primarily from the former Readiness and Internal Services programs dealing with readiness management or command and control. This is also where Defence Science, Technology and Analysis activities are included due to the direct linkage to Defence capability.

Internal Services in the new PAA is reduced in scope as the activities directly linked to specific military programs were aligned to the more appropriate PAA Programs.  As per Treasury Board direction, Internal Services was structured to include only those related activities and resources that apply across the department’s Programs and not those intended specifically for one Program.

Prior fiscal year expenditures are restated under the new PAA for comparative purposes. Variations, between restated expenditures, planned spending and actual results, are expected as the new structure is fully implemented. 

    

Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes

2014-15 Planned Spending by Whole-of-Government Spending Areas15 (dollars)

Departments and agencies are required to indicate in their Report on Plans and Priorities the alignment of Programs to Government of Canada outcome areas. The alignment of strategic outcomes and their corresponding Programs to the whole-of-government framework makes it possible to calculate spending by Government of Canada outcome area and correctly total all government spending. A Program can only be aligned to one Government of Canada outcome area. For a description of each of the outcome areas, see the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat website16.

 

Strategic OutcomeProgramSub-ProgramSpending Area Government of Canada Outcome

2014-15 Planned Spending

Defence Operations and Services Improve Stability and Security, and Promote Canadian Interests and Values

1.0 Defence

Combat and

Support

Operations

1.1 Domestic and Continental Defence Operations Social Affairs A safe and secure Canada 335,590,254
1.2 International Combat Operations International Affairs A safe and secure world through international engagement 286,537,020
1.3 Ongoing Centralized Operations and Operational Enablement International Affairs A safe and secure world through international engagement 741,815,072

2.0 Defence

Services and Contributions to Government

2.1 Disaster Relief and Humanitarian Operations International Affairs A safe and secure world through international engagement 8,310,319
2.2 Defence Services for Canadian Safety and Security Social Affairs A safe and secure Canada 111,282,984
2.3 Military Heritage and Outreach Social Affairs A vibrant Canadian culture and heritage 288,366,508
Defence Remains Continually Prepared to Deliver National Defence and Defence Services in Alignment with Canadian Interests and Values 3.0 Defence Ready Force Element Production 3.1 Force Elements Readiness Sustainment Social Affairs A safe and secure Canada 741,486,314
3.2 Force Elements Integration Training Social Affairs A safe and secure Canada 406,835,719
3.3 Force Elements Production Social Affairs A safe and secure Canada 1,439,335,417
3.4 Operational Readiness Production,Coordination and Command and Control Social Affairs A safe and secure Canada 451,779,434
4.0 Defence Capability Element Production 4.1 Military Personnel and Organization Lifecycle Social Affairs A safe and secure Canada 3,595,518,849
4.2 Materiel Lifecycle Social Affairs A safe and secure Canada 6,133,224,340
4.3 Real Property Lifecycle Social Affairs A safe and secure Canada 2,227,013,166
4.4 Information Systems Lifecycle Social Affairs A safe and secure Canada 693,731,305
5.0 Defence Capability Development and Research 5.1 Capability Design, Development and Integration Social Affairs A safe and secure Canada 305,548,337
5.2 Strategic Direction and Planning Support Social Affairs A safe and secure Canada 20,790,786

 

Total Planned Spending by Spending Area (dollars)

Spending AreaTotal Planned Spending
Economic Affairs N/A
Social Affairs 16,750,503,413
International Affairs 1,036,662,411
Government Affairs N/A

 

Departmental Spending Trend

Departmental Spending Trend Graph

Click on the image to see the text description that is available on a separate page

Click on the image to see the text description that is available on a separate page

  1. Actual spending represents the actual expenditures incurred during the respective fiscal year, as reported in Public Accounts.
  2. Forecast spending reflects the authorized funding levels to the end of the fiscal year.
  3. Planned spending reflects funds already brought into the Department's reference levels as well as amounts to be authorized through the Estimates process as presented in the Annual Reference Level Update. It also includes funding approved in the government fiscal plan, but yet to be brought into the Department's reference levels.

 

Over the period 2011-12 to 2016-17 actual, forecast and planned spending varies from a high of $20.2 billion in 2011-12 to a low of $17.6 billion in 2016-17. This net decrease of $2.6 billion is summarized as follows:  

Explanation of Departmental Financial Spending Trend Changes from 2011-12 to 2016-17 (dollars) 
Funding related to measures announced by the government in Budget 2012 and Budget 2013 to make government more efficient and return to a balanced budget (2,084,958,166)
Funding associated with the Canada First Defence Strategy (950,919,827)
Funding in statutory primarily related to lower Employee Benefit Plan forecasts (381,455,966)
Funding related to the establishment of Shared Services Canada and Communications Security Establishment as stand-alone agencies (374,973,435)
Funding to support Canada's international security operations in Afghanistan (253,854,759)
Net adjustments to spending on major capital equipment and infrastructure projects to align financial resources with current project acquisition timelines (217,634,330)
Funding authorized to be carried forward between fiscal years (123,104,545)
Other miscellaneous Departmental requirements (96,687,241)
Total Decreases (4,483,588,269)
Annual escalator on defence spending as announced in Budget 2008 to provide long-term and predictable funding 1,735,836,000
Compensation adjustments to pay and allowances 119,687,170
Total Increases 1,855,523,170
Net Change (2,628,065,099)

 

ESTIMATES BY VOTE

For information on the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces' organizational appropriations, please see the 2014–15 Main Estimates17 publication. 

 

 

CONTRIBUTION TO THE FEDERAL SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY

The 2013-16 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS)18, tabled on November 4, 2013, guides the Government of Canada’s 2013-16 sustainable development activities. The FSDS articulates Canada’s federal sustainable development priorities for a period of three years, as required by the Federal Sustainable Development Act

The Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces contributes to Theme III: Protecting Nature and Canadians and to Theme IV: Shrinking the Environmental Footprint – Beginning with Government as denoted by the visual identifiers below.

Theme III - Protecting Nature and Canadians and Theme IV - Shrinking the Environmental Footprint – Beginning with Government

These contributions are components of the following Sub-Programs and are further explained in Section II:

The Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces also ensures that its decision-making process includes a consideration of the FSDS goals and targets through the strategic environmental assessment (SEA).  A SEA for policy, plan or program proposals includes an analysis of the impacts of the proposal on the environment, including on the FSDS goals and targets. The results of SEAs are made public when an initiative is announced or approved, demonstrating that environmental factors were integrated into the decision-making process.

For additional details on the Department’s activities to support sustainable development please see Section II of this RPP and Defence’s Investing in Environment19 webpage. For complete details on the Strategy, please see the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy20 website.