Canadian Industry Doing Business with NATO FAQs

The purpose of this web page is to provide Canadian industry with a portal to access information regarding NATO business opportunities.

Where can I get help and information regarding NATO business opportunities?

The Resources Team at the Joint Delegation of Canada to NATO, together with the Canadian Trade Commissioner Service in Belgium and Luxembourg, keep Canadian companies informed of business opportunities at NATO, provide advice and support Industry Days to advise and share experience on how to do business with the NATO.

To contact the Resources Team at the Joint Delegation of Canada to NATO:

To contact the Canadian Trade Commissioner Service in Belgium and Luxembourg:

Where do I find information on NATO contract opportunities?

Information on NATO contract opportunities is available at the following NATO websites. Canadian companies interested in doing business with NATO should regularly visit these websites.

Information on NATO contract opportunities is also provided during NATO Industry events that are held annually. Presentations are available from the most recent NATO Communications and Information Agency (NCIA) Industry Conference. At the conference, NCIA provided industry an 18 month look ahead to upcoming contract opportunities and information on how to do business with NCIA.

Those presentations are available upon request from the Joint Delegation of Canada to NATO.

How do I do business with the NATO Support Agency (NSPA)?

The NATO Support Agency (NSPA), situated at Capellen in Luxembourg, will only do business with companies that are registered with them. To be registered, companies must follow these instructions:

  1. go to the NSPA website
  2. then go to "Business with NSPA”, then “Business ePortal”
  3. a new window opens, then select "Enter eProcurement"
  4. from there companies can find information on:
    • how to do business with NSPA
    • how to get registered (online)

Contact source-file@nspa.nato.int for questions related to registration.

How can I test my system to ensure interoperability with other NATO systems?

Your first stop should be the Distributed Networked Battle Labs (DNBL), which is a virtual lab with its hub located at NCIA in The Hague. The DNBL has been created in order to tighten cooperation on preparation and conduct of Experimentation, Test and Evaluation (ETE) events between NATO organizations, nations, industry and academia. The DNBL Framework provides the operating model to enable the federated use of capabilities and systems for a wide range of user groups and to exchange ETE services available in the DNBL Service Catalogue. The following website and YouTube video offer much more information on the DNBL.

Where can I find NATO Standardization documents?

The NATO Standardization Agency (NSA) website (English only) will take you to where you can use the search engine to locate the document you need. If the document is classified, you will need to contact the Canadian Delegation to receive the document.

How do I bid on a NATO contract opportunity?

In order to bid on a NATO contract opportunity, Canadian companies must first be nominated by the Canadian Joint Delegation to NATO. That nomination process begins with the Notification of Intent (NOI) letter to the NATO Nations. The NOI letter informs the NATO Nations of a contract opportunity and invites nominations from all the NATO Delegations. The NOI letter is promulgated on the Buy and Sell website, the Government of Canada electronic tendering service, with instructions to companies interested in bidding on the opportunity. If interested, the company informs the Canadian Joint Delegation to NATO by email, according to the instructions on the Buy and Sell website. Once nominated, the company is then eligible to receive the Invitation for Bid (IFB) package.

What is the procedure for international competitive bidding on NATO contracting opportunities?

The procedure for International Competitive Bidding (ICB) on NATO contracts funded by the NATO Security Investment Programme (NSIP), which involves most capital projects, is described in a 1996 NATO document called AC/4-D/2261(1996). The 1996 document was updated in 2004 to include an annex that describes best value procedures. 

The documents for the procedure for international competitive bidding on NATO contracting opportunities are available upon request by contacting the Resource Team at the Joint Delegation of Canada to NATO. 

What is the NATO Security and Investment Programme (NSIP)?

The NATO Security and Investment Programme (NSIP) is a key mechanism to deliver capability via NATO Common Funding, while directly contributing to improving NATO's defence capabilities and promoting interoperability between the 28 Allies. NSIP finances the provision of key military capabilities in support of Article 5 requirements, NATO Crisis Response Operations, the NATO Command Structure, NATO-wide Communications and Information Systems (NCI), Air Command & Control (Air C2), as well as reinforcement and logistics.

NSIP is implemented under the supervision of the Investment Committee (IC) within an annual contribution ceiling approved by the North Atlantic Council (NAC). The IC screens and authorizes projects designed to meet those operational requirements of the NATO Strategic Commands, Allied Command Operations (ACO) and Allied Command Transformation (ACT), which exceed the national defence requirements of individual member nations. The IC also approves the procurement strategy for individual NSIP projects. 

How can I promote my business to NATO?

NATO offers industry a number of opportunities to promote their products and to interact with NATO staff on specific projects and trials as follows:

  • NATO Industry Conferences are held annually, during which business opportunities are presented and staff are available to respond to questions on specific projects or on procurement related matters. In addition, kiosks are set up to engage industry on topics of interest. Contact the Joint Delegation of Canada to NATO for more information.
  • Allied Command Transformation (ACT) in Norfolk, Virginia has established the Framework For Collaborative Interaction (FFCI) Homepage (English only). Being responsible for capability development, ACT engages the NATO nations, industry and academic institutions through this framework to leverage the extensive knowledge available. For more information, contact the FFCI.
  • Canadian companies are welcome to visit the Joint Delegation of Canada to NATO in Brussels and the NATO Agencies to meet with personnel involved with projects that may be of interest to your company. The points of contact below can assist you with setting up a visit. 

Where do I find information on NATO Security Clearances?

Information on NATO Security Clearances is available on the Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC) website under Industrial Security.

How do I initiate a visit to NATO Headquarters and to the NATO agencies NCIA and/or NSPA?

When planning a visit to NATO Headquarters and to the NATO agencies, allow a few weeks for appropriate approvals and arrangements to be made for your visit. The Request for Visit procedure is described on the Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC) website for Industrial Security Services. Be sure to make contact with the Canadian Delegation to NATO as well, so appointments can be made on your behalf. The contact information for the Canadian Joint Delegation is provided on this page.

Who can I contact for more information on doing business with NATO?

To contact the Resources Team at the Joint Delegation of Canada to NATO:

To contact the Canadian Trade Commissioner Service in Belgium and Luxembourg:

Where can I find additional information on doing business with NATO?

 Visit the Guide to Navigating NATO Procurement, a document prepared for Canadian industry by the Joint Delegation of Canada to NATO.