ARCHIVED - Flags flown by the Canadian Army

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Fact Sheet / August 16, 2011

Throughout the First World War, the Union Jack was flown by the Canadian Army. During the Second World War, the Canadian Active Service Force flag, commonly referred to as the “battle flag,” was authorized to indicate the Headquarters of the senior Canadian combatant formation overseas. However, by the summer of 1943, Army Council recommended the Red Ensign with the Canadian coat of arms in the fly become the official flag of the Canadian Army. Following the Second World War there was no distinctive flag for the Army, but the Red Ensign was to be the main flag for all components of the Canadian Army. As a whole, the Canadian Army did not have its own flag or Ensign; it simply used the Canadian National Flag when required.

Canadian Active Service Force (1939 – 1943)
Canadian Active Service Force (1939 – 1943)
Red Ensign (1944 – 1965)
Red Ensign (1944 – 1965)

In 1989, Mobile Command requested and received a command flag. It was granted a standard command flag pattern flag with the Canadian Flag in upper canton and the badge of Mobile Command in the fly. When Mobile Command was re-designated Land Force Command (LFC) in 1992, it continued to use the device of Mobile Command for some time. In 1998, the LFC badge was issued. This badge was based on the previous Canadian Army badge of the post war era. The current command flag uses the standard command flag design with a white field and the LFC badge in the fly.

Land Force Command Flag   (1998 – Present)
Land Force Command Flag (1998 – Present)

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